Department of Psychology

Staff

Photo of Abdullah Alajmi

Abdullah Alajmi

  • Qualifications: BSc (Hons), MSc (distinction) in Special Education, MSc in Developmental Psychology
  • Role Title: PhD Student
  • Address: King Henry Building, King Henry 1st Street, Portsmouth, Hampshire, PO1 2DY
  • Telephone: 023 9284 6334
  • Email: abdullah.alajmi@port.ac.uk
  • Department: Psychology
  • Faculty: Faculty of Science

Biography

I graduated from Kuwait University in 2002 with a Bachelors Degree (Hons) in Educational Psychology and began working shortly after in the field of Psychology as a teacher in high school in Kuwait. I was awarded a scholarship in 2004 from the Ministry of Education in Kuwait to study a Master’s degree at the Arabian Gulf University in the Kingdom of Bahrain in Special Education (specialising in Learning Disabilities). After this, I returned to my job as a teacher in 2008. I also obtained a second Masters Degree from the University of Kent in Developmental Psychology in 2014 after receiving a scholarship from The Public Authority for Applied Education and Training (PAAET) in Kuwait. I started my PhD in 2016 in the Department of Psychology investigating teaching methods in Higher Education under the supervision of Dr Mark Turner, Dr Julie Udell, and Prof Sherria Hoskins.

Research

The title of my research project is “What works best? Perspectives of lecturers and students towards different approaches of teaching in higher education system in the UK”. My thesis will explore attitudes towards different approaches to teaching that are commonly used in the UK Higher Education system by interviewing lecturers and surveying students. In addition, I will conduct an intervention study to evaluate the effectiveness of 3 different teaching methods (traditional and non-traditional methods) for student and lecturer perspectives. The aim of my research is to address what are the most effective ways to teach and learn in contemporary higher education given more recent advances in educational technology and shifts in students’ approaches to learning.