Composite of Chernobyl, football pitch, girl with a nebuliser

Research Impact

star Overview

The impact of research at the University of Portsmouth stretches from immediate worldly application in areas such as clinical practice or business development to longer-term impact such as influencing government policy or undertaking early drug development testing. Our impact is wide, positive and available to see in the world around us today.

These pages highlight a selection the excellent stories that indicate how Portsmouth research is having impact.The selection shown, has been ordered into four categories: Business Efficiency, Clinical Excellence, Environmental Modelling and Government Policy. You can access a more comprehensive list of stories by downloading our publication Portsmouth Impacts.

Portsmouth Impacts

We maintain an online publication - Portsmouth Impacts - which tells more of our impact stories and is updated twice a year.

Download publication

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star Business Efficiency

Asset management in the Premier League: peak performance, low outlay

The Issue

A goal for most organisations is to expand efficiently and effectively to match new markets without incurring formidable costs. Organisational growth – widening a customer base and increasing commercial activity - traditionally is achieved by restructure and substantial investment. Football clubs are no exception. In aiming to progress their league position and reach new fans or sponsors, clubs need a relevant business model that enables adaptation to a wider external environment but one that is not reliant on significant cash investment.

The research

The University and Bolton Wanderers Football Club collaborated on an extended ethnographic case study (2003-2007). This research aimed to demonstrate how an organisation could use seismic changes in external environment to transform performance, without requiring radical restructuring or coercive forms of leadership. A model was developed that explained how performance could be heightened and offered a template for other organisations similarly unable to rely on consistent cash injections. The template has since been applied at another Premier League club that reached the final of the Europa Cup.

The impact

Asset Maximization has an international reach with many sports organisations adopting the template including: New South Wales Rugby Union, The Australian Turf Club, Burnley FC, The Football League Trust, Atlanta Spirit and Philadelphia Union. Organisations that have implemented the model have reported benefits running into six figures, in addition to bringing sustained improved performance.

football pitch

Contact

Dr Sarah Gilmore
E: sarah.gilmore@port.ac.uk
Portsmouth Business School

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star Clinical Excellence

Nebulisation of intravenous (IV) drugs for the treatment of Cystic Fibrosis in children

The Issue

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal, genetically inherited disease of the Western world. Although CF is a multi-organ disease, most patients die as a result of lung disease caused by infection and inflammation of the lung. Different types of nebuliser produce different particle sizes; the ability of a nebuliser to deliver the intended concentration also depends on the physical characteristics of the solution being nebulised. Recent developments to treat lung conditions in CF patients include the nebulisation of intravenous (IV) drug solutions off-licence; nebulisation of IV antibiotic, mucolytic and anti-inflammatory drugs have been reported. Not enough is known about the nebulisation profiles of IV drug solutions when combined with the variety of nebulizers available to patients.

The research

Our research was funded by the Charlotte Francis May Foundation, in collaboration with Southampton Pharmacy Research Centre at University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS). We investigated nebulisation profiles from standard nebulisers to identify the optimum combinations of drugs and devices. The pharmacist and adult and paediatric CF consultants at UHS have adopted our recommendations and the findings have been disseminated at national conferences.

The impact

CF sufferers will benefit most as they will receive the drugs need in the most effective way, reducing the time of drug delivery and improving patient compliance. Using the recommended device will ensure effective delivery but will also decrease wastage of drugs resulting in money being saved by the NHS. Respiratory physicians who adopt the recommendations will know they are treating their patients optimally. The research has the potential to impact positively the millions of people worldwide, who have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and require inhaled antibiotics.

child with nebuliser

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star Environmental Modelling

From Chernobyl to Fukushima: Long term environmental impact of nuclear power plant accidents

The Issue

The 1986 Chernobyl accident has been described as the worst industrial accident in human history, directly or indirectly affecting the lives of millions of people both in the former Soviet Union and in Western Europe. No significant data currently exists to measure the impact of such accidents, inform appropriate responses and formulate practical control methodologies.

The research

Professor Jim Smith and colleagues have been studying the environmental impact of radioactive contamination in relation to the long term impact of the Chernobyl accident. Their research has helped to quantify the rates of transfer of radioactive contamination through the ecosystem and its implications for human and ecosystem health. In a series of collaborative projects the team have developed models to predict the impact on the food-chain of radiocaesium contamination. Further research has found little evidence of long-term consequences for ecosystems in the area surrounding the reactor.

The impact

Improved understanding of the environmental fate and transfers of radionuclides in aquatic ecosystems has played a key role in the development and assessment of measures to remediate lakes, rivers and reservoirs contaminated by nuclear incidents. The evaluation of countermeasures to protect drinking water and aquatic foodstuffs following nuclear incidents was included in the European Commission EURANOS radioactive countermeasures database. Following the Fukushima incident, Professor Smith was part of a team of experts briefing national and international news media which made a significant impact on people’s understanding of environmental radiation. Such work is crucial to informing current international and UK debates on nuclear new build and waste disposal.

Chernobyl Nuclear Plant

Contact

Professor Jim Smith
E: jim.smith@port.ac.uk
School of Earth and Environmental Sciences

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star Government Policy

Contracting Out Employment Services: The Design and Implementation of Welfare to Work Markets

The Issue

Prior to this body of research, there was little systematic comparative evidence available on contracting out welfare to work programmes. Professor Finn is working now with a consortium of research organisations commissioned to evaluate the Work Programme. He is a member of the ‘Evidence Review Group’ and has regularly given presentations on his findings to successive British Ministers and Shadow Ministers.

The research

The underpinning body of research comprised a set of externally funded research projects investigating the rationale, design, implementation and impacts of contracting out employment and welfare to work services and programmes. Individual projects were funded by different organisations, from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation to the Department for Work and Pensions, and undertaken with the independent centre for Economic and Social Inclusion. The research included case study visits to Australia, the Netherlands and the USA, with the country-specific fieldwork supplemented by reviews of documentary evidence. The most recent output comprised a 2011 review of employment services subcontracting practices for the European Commission.

The impact

Each project had particular objectives however all addressed a number of key themes focussed on informing the evolving UK debate on the commissioning and delivery of contracted out employment programmes. The results of the findings have been twofold. First, in the accumulation of publicly available comparative research on the benefits and risks associated with contracting out and ‘payment by results’ funding systems. Second, they have established an understanding of the safeguards necessary to ensure high service quality and user experience. The findings have helped shape the design and implementation of the Department of Work and Pensions’ Commissioning Strategy (2008) and the British Government’s flagship ‘payment by results’ Work Programme (this will cater for between two and three million unemployed people over the forthcoming seven year contract period).

Government logo

Contact

Professor Dan Finn
E: dan.finn@port.ac.uk
School of Social, Historical and Literary Studies

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