School of Engineering

Staff

Ms Aikaterini Stamou

  • Role Title: Research Student
  • Address: Anglesea Building, Anglesea Road, Portsmouth PO1 3DJ UK
  • Telephone: +44 (0)23 9284 6451
  • Email: katerina.Stamou@port.ac.uk
  • Department: School of Engineering
  • Faculty: Faculty of Technology

Biography

My research is focused on the scientific field of Biomechanics. I completed my under-graduate studies in the National Technical University of Athens and obtained the certificate of the Applied Mathematics and Physics sciences with specialty on the Physics applications. Then, I acquired my post-graduate certificate on the implementations of Finite Element Methods on Solid Mechanics.

My PhD study is titled “Haemodynamic properties of the carotid artery”. It will focus on comprehending the manner in which the haemodynamic and vascular properties describing a stenosis at a carotid artery affect the loading of the wall plaque forming the stenosis. This loading has been shown to lead to plaque rupture. The main aim of this research is to investigate these forces at the carotid bifurcation and how they are affected by features such as blood flow rate, plaque geometry and vascular compliance.

It is evident throughout the literature that haemodynamic and vascular properties in the carotid artery influence the blood velocity, shear stresses and mechanical forces acting at the carotid bifurcation. It is therefore important be able to understand how all of these features influence the build-up of plaque and its possible rupture. My PhD will address this through numerical simulation.

My PhD study will investigate the relationship between arterial haemodynamics, vascular properties and their influence on forces on the stenosed regions of the carotid artery. The magnitude of this force on the stenosis significantly affects its rupture which leads to thrombosis or Ischaemic stroke. Thus, this study will provided a better understanding of the complex relationship between the vascular factors which could possible help reduce the mortality rate due to icshaematic strokes.