Palaeontology students Hamzah Imran on Southsea beach by the old seawall

Palaeontology BSc (Hons)

We're exploring how the fossil record can help us understand past climates and environments, and effectively predict and model the threat and impact of climate change on our ecosystems.

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University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

F641

Accreditation:

This course is Accredited

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 UCAS points from a specific Science subject

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

Apply now

Are you interested in studying the processes of how life on Earth began, evolved and diversified? Do you enjoy getting your hands dirty as well as spending time in the lab?

Get ready to dig up the past on our BSc (Hons) Palaeontology degree course, which is accredited by The Geological Society of London.

Course highlights

  • Reveal the secrets of ancient life in our Earth science and palaeontology laboratories, stocked with rock, mineral and fossil specimens
  • Work alongside our active academic research team on the latest palaeontological theories and models, as they integrate new ideas and data into teaching
  • Unearth your own discoveries on field trips in locations such as the Isle of Wight, Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site locations Lulworth Cove and Lyme Regis, and other famous fossil localities
We try and make our students as employable as possible by giving them access to some really excellent resources and expertise. Portsmouth's really well located for easy access to some famous fossil localities.

Dr Anthony Butcher, Course leader, BSc (Hons) Palaeontology

The Geological Society Accrediting body logo

Top 30

for student satisfaction

(Times Higher Education, 2024)

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by The Geological Society of London.

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

Clearing is open

This course is available through Clearing.

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

Apply now

Guaranteed accommodation

Apply now and you'll be offered a guaranteed room in halls if you accept your offer within 48 hours of receiving it.
Student accommodation
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Connected Degrees®

Only at Portsmouth you have the choice to take a traditional sandwich placement before your third year, or to take your placement after your final year.

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Clearing 2024 opens on 5 July and closes on 21 October

Every year thousands of students find their ideal undergraduate course through Clearing. Clearing matches students who are looking for a different course or university from their original choice, or who are applying for the very first time after 30 June, to courses that universities still have places on.

The majority of people apply through Clearing once they receive their exam results on A level / T level results day (15 August 2024).

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The majority of UK students apply through Clearing once they receive their A level / T level results in August 2024, so as an international student if you already have your exam results you can apply when Clearing opens. 

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Entry requirements

BSc (Hons) Palaeontology degree entry requirements

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Applied Science, Archaeology, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science/Studies, Geography, Geology, Mathematics or Physics). (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit. Acceptable T Level Subjects:
    T Level in Construction: Design, Surveying and Planning, T Level in Health, T Level in Healthcare Science, T Level in Science 
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Applied Science, Archaeology, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science/Studies, Geography, Geology, Mathematics or Physics). (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit. Acceptable T Level Subjects:
    T Level in Health, T Level in Healthcare Science, T Level in Science
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects or GCSEs – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Facilities and specialist equipment

Palaeontology and Advanced Microscopy Laboratories

Examine rock, mineral and fossil specimens using the specialist kit in these labs, such as transmitted light, polarising and scanning electron microscopes, and explore processes including acid digestion, air abrasion and microfossil extraction.

Students examining fossils in palaeontology lab
Learn more about the labs

Geochemistry Laboratory

Study the ancient properties of the Earth’s surface materials in this lab, using techniques including palynology processing – the study of strewn particles – for acid dissolutions of rock matrices, sample sieving and heavy liquid separation.

A river delta
Explore the lab

Cutting Laboratory

Get a closer look at the cores of bulk rock formations, excavated by our diamond-tipped coring drill, and examine rock chips cut by our diamond-bladed saws, to discover what they can help us understand about past climates and environments.

Technology Facilities; 31st May 2019
Learn more about the lab

Palaeontology facilities at the University of Portsmouth

Course leader Dr Anthony Butcher talks about the facilities on offer on the Palaeontology BSc (Hons) at the University of Portsmouth.

Dr Anthony Butcher: Palaeontology, the word itself means the study of ancient life. From the earliest algae right through to the biggest dinosaurs and even early human ancestors as well. It's satisfying seeing students come in with a real enthusiasm for dinosaurs and actually seeing their interests explode in some of these other areas.

We try and make our students as employable as possible by giving them access to some really excellent resources and expertise. Portsmouth's really well located for easy access to some famous fossil localities. We offer virtual alternatives to our field trips and those were approved by our accrediting body, the Geological Society of London. It's very rewarding to see our students go on to utilise those skills after graduation. 

The lecturers are helpful and enthusiastic, and there is a lot of new lab equipment as well as extensive fossil collections. There are also fantastic opportunities for field trips.

Lucy Hicks, BSc (Hons) Palaeontology

Careers and opportunities

Palaeontology is the study of ancient life, from the earliest algae to the biggest dinosaurs and our first human ancestors. It seeks to uncover the ways in which life on Earth evolved through the ages, and in turn, how this can help us better understand the natural world today.

Studying fossilised lifeforms can reveal facts about biology, ecology and evolution vital to many modern environmental issues, including climate change.

Gain valuable skills for a range of scientific careers

On this BSc (Hons) Palaeontology degree, you gain the knowledge and expertise to become a skilled palaeontologist, without any previous experience in palaeontology or geology. 
When you graduate, you’ll have a strong set of transferable skills suitable for a range of scientific roles, in areas such as energy resources and exploration, environmental consultancy, teaching and museum curation.
You could also continue your studies with our research master's programme in Palaeontology, which would enable you to spend a year working on a dedicated project in an paleontological area that interests you. Many of our MRes students publish papers in scientific journals by the time they complete the programme.

A reconstruction of Brighstoneus simmondsi by John Sibbick

New dinosaur discovered by PhD student

PhD student, Jeremy Lockwood, discovered the new dinosaur on the Isle of Wight, with help from university and Natural History Museum scientists.

Read More

What areas can you work in with a palaeontology degree?

Previous students have gone on to work and study in areas such as:

  • energy resources and exploration
  • environmental consultancy
  • museum curation
  • teaching
  • academic research

What jobs can you do with a palaeontology degree?

They've gone on to work in the following roles:

  • researcher of vertebrate palaeontology
  • geographic information systems (GIS) editor
  • science teacher

What can you do with a palaentology degree?

Course leader Dr Anthony Butcher talks about the careers that Palaeontology BSc (Hons) students at the University of Portsmouth can go on to do.

Dr Anthony Butcher: After graduation, our students have a really strong set of transferable skills and general scientific skills as well.

So even if they're not able to go into a palaeontological role, they can go into things such as environmental consultancy, public outreach and engagement, teaching and museum work.

At Portsmouth, we run an MRes, a research master's programme in Palaeontology. That can range everything from palaeobotany to vertebrate palaeontology, dinosaurs, pterosaurs. Students are able to work on a dedicated project for an entire year and a lot of our students, by the time they finish their MRes, have actually published papers in scientific journals. 

Female student at computer

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Placement opportunities

After your second or third year, you can do an optional work placement to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry. Placements give you the opportunity to apply what you've learnt so far in a real workplace, boosting your employability and making you attractive to employers after graduation.

You can work for a company or organisation here in the UK or overseas, or you could go independent by setting up and running your own business with other students. 

Previous students have enjoyed placements at civil engineering, mining and quarrying companies and the Dinosaur Isle museum on the Isle of Wight.

Whichever route you choose, you'll receive support and guidance. Our specialist team of Science and Health Careers advisors can help you with finding a work placement and improving your employability skills. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search – including help with applications and interviews – and support throughout your placement.

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

What you'll study

Core modules

All modules in this year are core.

You’ll think about Earth science in terms of a global, integrated, system. You’ll become familiar with basic physics, chemistry, and mathematics and IT skills, including a basic introduction to programming, data analysis and visualisation.

You’ll get an introduction to the Linnaean taxonomic system and learn about the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships based on adult and larval morphology and molecular comparisons. Focusing on vertebrates, you’ll also look at their origins, anatomy, osteology, and preservation in the fossil record.

You’ll explore the physical and optical properties of the common rock-forming minerals, and the importance of minerals to society today. You’ll get an introduction to a variety of igneous and metamorphic rocks, and learn about their classification, compositions and textures. You’ll also relate these aspects to the potential origins of the rocks and their setting within the global tectonic framework.

Through case studies, in-depth lectures and workshops, you’ll think about the nature and extent of human impact on the environment, and learn about the complexities of managing environmental, population and resource change at local and global levels.

Why do continents drift? What forces build majestic mountain ranges? Explore these questions and more on this module. You’ll explore theories on the origin of the Solar System and the Earth while looking into the origin and nature of the Earth's atmosphere, oceans, and their circulation systems. Learn to describe methods of measuring geological tim and investigate the main processes that characterise the major periods of the Earth's history. You’ll get to grips with the basic building blocks of the Earth's crust and get an introduction to the rocks and minerals that make up common igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. You’ll also learn how to read and interpret geological maps, and discover the techniques used for observation and recording geological data.

You’ll learn about important invertebrate fossil groups and their applications, sedimentary materials and processes, and the geological history of our planet. Topics you’ll cover include the principles of palaeontological concepts, an introduction to fossil groups such as trilobites and ammonites, the sedimentary rock cycle and principal sedimentary processes, and the geological history of the British Isles.

Core modules

All modules in this year are core.

You’ll learn about the palaeontology of the early tetrapods, including the origin of amphibia and reptiles. Topics you’ll cover include the transition from water to land and the development of the amniote egg. You’ll explore the early diversification of the reptilia, and examine the early archosaurs including crocodiles and pterosaurs. You’ll also examine the evolution of limblessness by delving into the evolution of snakes.

You’ll investigate the concept of body plans of the invertebrate phyla, and their functional morphology and evolution, examining specimens in our labs to put your newly-acquired knowledge into practice. You’ll also learn about methods of quantitative analysis in palaeontology, along with the principles and process behind undertaking a cladistic analysis of a fossil group.

You’ll attend lectures and take part in practicals, supplemented by scanning electron microscope sessions. You’ll get an introduction to the most important microfossil groups and how they are used in particular to determine palaeoenvironments. You’ll also learn about the evolution of plants, and how the major plant groups have impacted the biosphere throughout Earth's history.

From laboratory techniques to digital scanning, you'll gain technical know-how through practicals, fieldwork and laboratory time. You’ll learn how to extract, prepare, curate and illustrate fossil specimens and how to use software to draft professional diagrams. You’ll also find out how to use the scanning electron microscope (SEM), learning how to prepare samples and use it to take spectacular images.

You’ll take part in geological field work, using what you’ve learnt so far to collect detailed and accurate field data while being trained in new techniques such as field mapping. After the fieldwork, you’ll use your data to produce a scientific report on the geology and palaeontology of the field location, interpreting and presenting the data in a professional format. You’ll also spend time considering the career path you might want to follow, and how best to gain the necessary skills, experience and qualifications to do so.

On this module, you’ll explore how a broad range of modern continental and marine environments produce different sedimentary facies. You’ll broaden your practical and field sedimentological skills and learn how to in apply your knowledge to making palaeoenvironmental deductions.

Core modules

Supported by your Academic Tutor, you'll select and manage information and competently undertake research tasks. You'll assess health and safety, the ethical considerations in pursuing independent research, and critically evaluate your findings against knowledge in available academic literature. You'll learn to discuss and communicate your key findings found from your research and write a dissertation in accordance with academic conventions.

Optional modules

You’ll gain an understanding of modern analytical methods used in Earth and Environmental sciences, ranging from project design and the choice of laboratory techniques, through to data collection, evaluation and interpretation. You’ll also get hands-on experience in our state-of-the-art laboratories for environmental chemistry, geochemistry, mineralogy and microscopy.

You’ll look at employment prospects including postgraduate study and research, public engagement, and the commercial sector. You’ll also get training and experience in how palaeontological and sedimentological data may be used as problem-solving tools including, but not limited to, biostratigraphy and sedimentary basin analysis.

You’ll examine the physical factors driving climate over history and the signatures of modern anthropogenic influence. Through climate modelling software, you'll investigate future warming scenarios and impacts regionally and globally. In a self-directed study, you'll assess vulnerabilities and solutions - evaluating possibilities for adaptation and mitigating climate change.

You’ll start by exploring the palaeontology and palaeobiology of dinosaurs and birds, examining their structure, lifestyle, distribution both temporally and geographically, and their evolutionary relationships. You’ll look at the history of the science of ‘dinosaurology’, and the evolutionary relationship between non-avian dinosaurs and birds. You’ll also investigate the evolution and diversity of mammals, from their early origins from ‘mammal-like reptiles’ through to the present day. You’ll take part in lectures and practical classes that use real specimens, both fossil and extant skeletal materials. You’ll also visit a museum collection to see world-class specimens and displays, applying your new knowledge and skills to their interpretation.

On this course you'll:

  • Characterise and critically evaluate key evolutionary and ecological concepts and mechanisms that either create or constrain trait diversity in both animals and plants.
  • Critically evaluate the effects of environmental variables, such as climate, on the biology and ecology of natural populations.
  • Apply selected contemporary ecological and evolutionary scientific methodologies that are at the forefront of the discipline, as well as discuss the benefits, capabilities, and limits thereof.
  • Demonstrate the ability to research and to critically interpret and evaluate relevant scientific literature of a specific evolutionary or ecological topic, and disseminate the broader significance thereof.

You’ll consider these hazards from a number of angles, including how these are expressed upon landscapes, the nature of natural hazards through a range of spatial and temporal scales, and the effect these have on past and present human populations and civilisations. You’ll look at geophysical hazards like earthquakes, biological hazards such as pandemics, hydrological hazards like droughts, climatological hazards such as wildfires, and anthropological hazards like nuclear war.

You’ll get familiar with the big issues and contemporary debates in education studies as well as the role and expectations of a teacher.

You’ll develops fundamental knowledge and skills that teachers require, as well as your capability to structure and critique a lesson plan.

Prior to the trip there will be a series of lectures to introduce and critically analyse selected fossil Lagerstätten, and the taphonomic processes that led to these becoming sites of exceptional preservation. The module will be assessed via a group oral presentation, and an individual portfolio of fieldwork tasks/notes.

Boost your employability by taking an industry-based work placement year with a relevant organisation or immerse yourself in another culture by studying for a year at one of our partner universities worldwide.

This is an amazing opportunity to either put everything you’ve learned so far into action in a real workplace or expand your horizons and set yourself up for your future career by studying abroad and becoming a student ambassador for our university.

Depending on what you choose, we’ll help you find and secure an exciting placement opportunity within an appropriate company or organisation, or you’ll expand your global perspective and develop additional skills to boost your future career during a study abroad year.

This is a Connected Degree

We're the only university that gives you the flexibility to choose when to take a work placement. Take it after your 2nd year, before returning to finish your studies. Or after your final year, connecting you into the workplace.

If you're not sure if or when to take your placement, don't worry. You'll have plenty of time to settle into your studies and explore your options before making your choice. 

Find out more about Connected Degrees

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • laboratory reports
  • oral and poster presentations
  • reports on field-based projects
  • computer-based assessment

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • tutorials
  • laboratory work
  • fieldwork

A pterosaur like no other

Professor of Palaeobiology, Dave Martill, explains how our palaeontologists discovered a new species of small toothless pterosaur. 

External Audio

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who’ll teach you on this degree course.

Anthony Butcher Portrait

Dr Anthony Butcher

Programme Lead (Geosciences)

Anthony.Butcher@port.ac.uk

School of the Environment, Geography, and Geosciences

Faculty of Science and Health

PhD Supervisor

Read more
Pilar Mariem Saavedra Pellitero Portrait

Dr Mariem Saavedra Pellitero

Senior Lecturer

Mariem.Saavedra-Pellitero@port.ac.uk

Read more
Nizar Ibrahim Portrait

Dr Nizar Ibrahim

Senior Lecturer

Nizar.Ibrahim@port.ac.uk

School of the Environment, Geography, and Geosciences

Faculty of Science and Health

PhD Supervisor

Read more
Nicholas John Minter Portrait

Dr Nic Minter

Associate Professor in Analytical and Experimental Palaeontology

Nic.Minter@port.ac.uk

PhD Supervisor

Read more

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Palaeontology degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, practical classes and workshops and external visits for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £19,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £19,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

 

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Your travel and accommodation costs for compulsory fieldwork are included in the course fee, with the exception of the Mapping Training Field Course, which takes place around the UK in the summer between the first and second year of study. Travel and accommodation for the Mapping Training Field Course costs around £100. You’ll also need to pay for meals and other living costs on compulsory fieldwork trips.

You’ll need to cover the cost of travel, accommodation, meals and other living costs for any optional fieldwork you do. These costs are normally around £1,200.

For compulsory project work, normally in the UK or Europe, costs for travel and accommodation will range from £0–£1,000.

You will be provided with essential health and safety equipment free of charge, and loaned equipment such as a compass clinometer, hammer, etc. where appropriate (though you may use your own equipment, if it is up to standard). You will, however, need to purchase your own clothing appropriate for fieldwork (e.g. waterproofs, rucksack, sturdy walking boots, etc.).

During your placement year or study abroad year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, tuition fees for that year are:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

How to apply

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

Apply now

Applying for year 2 or 3

If you've already completed part of this course with us or another university and would like to apply for the second or third year with us in September 2024, use our online application form.

September 2025 applications

To start this course in 2025, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – F641
  • our institution code – P80

 Apply now through UCAS

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074