Ocean research receives boost from Portsmouth charity

A former student at the University of Portsmouth is paying it forward by giving six students £400 each to help them with their studies.

The grants, from Portsmouth-based ocean conservation charity Just One Ocean, are for research projects that align with the charity’s mission to protect the ocean for future generations through science, education and communication.

Five of those given the funding are studying for their masters in Coastal and Marine Resource Management, which is celebrating its 25th anniversary this year.  A sixth student is studying towards their masters in research in the School of Environment, Geography and Geosciences.

This is the second year that the charity has awarded grants to students on the course.

ocean waves

Just One Ocean grants are designed to help protect the ocean for future generations 

The charity’s founder, David Jones is himself a graduate of the course and currently a postgraduate researcher.

He said: “The Coastal and Marine Resource Management course was excellent. It addresses a wide range of maritime issues and offers some fantastic opportunities to graduates. I just wanted to help the current students make the most of it by providing them with a little financial support.”

As well as awarding about £400 each to the students, the charity has also built and is hosting web pages for each award recipient to publish their research progress and findings. These webpages will be archived as a future resource.

One of those given funding is Antaya March. She is using the money to help establish links with South Africa’s diving community to try and encourage them to help her work, as well as paying for a marine research permit in Cape Town.

She said: “The grant from Just One Ocean is helping my research into the effects of scuba diving on marine protected areas in Cape Town. Hopefully, my research will provide some insight into management methods that will better protect the marine environment and use divers to contribute to marine conservation in the area.”

Thanks to David’s commitment to establishing scientific data to help influence policies, we will better understand how people manage their own coastal issues which, in turn, is likely to bring about better management of our coasts and seas.

Hannah Barnes, Masters student

Another recipient, Simon Slattery, is pleased he can now afford to regularly travel to Hayling Island where he is studying microplastics.

He said: “I’m looking at the amount and type of microplastics that can be found on the shores of Hayling Island, these being plastic pieces smaller than 5mm. I'm particularly interested in the area below the Hayling Island ferry at the entrance to Langstone Harbour. The Just One Ocean award will help me afford my research, and will primarily be used for transport to and from the site.”

Hannah Barnes said she was thrilled to be given an award for her work examining people’s perceptions of how Chichester Harbour’s Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is being managed.

She said: “Thanks to David’s commitment to establishing scientific data to help influence policies, we will better understand how people manage their own coastal issues which, in turn, is likely to bring about better management of our coasts and seas.”

Course Leader Dr Jonathan Potts has been running the course for 13 years. He said: “The Coastal and Marine Resource Management course has reached its 25th anniversary milestone this year and it continues to be a popular programme. Being based on the south coast provides an ideal opportunity for research on our doorstep. It is great to have the support of a global conservation charity Just One Ocean that happens to be based in Portsmouth.”

You can find out more about the individual students’ research on the charity's website.

 

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