Portsmouth Professor features in new podcast series

Professor Deborah Sugg Ryan at Portsmouth City Museum in front of the 1930 kitchen

Professor Deborah Sugg Ryan is a contributor to the podcast, Kitchens, a series about the most important room in the home

  • 16 August 2021
  • 2 min read

Professor Deborah Sugg Ryan features in episode one of the six part series, Kitchens, a podcast exploring the most important room in the home. 

The fitted kitchen is ubiquitous in British homes, containing wall-mounted cabinets, continuous work surfaces, oven, hob, sink, fridge. Maybe a table, often not. But we all have different lives, tastes, needs; we cook different foods. How did we all end up with the same kitchen?

Rooted in the memories and personal stories embedded in people's kitchens, Kitchens combines the history of design and food to understand the current context of how and where we cook. 

Professor of Design History and Theory in the Faculty of Creative and Cultural industries, Deborah Sugg Ryan features in the first episode of the series, Trophy Cabinets. In this episode Professor Sugg Ryan explores what came before the fitted kitchen, and how the room itself has changed drastically over the 20th century.

“The kitchen is this amazing space...it’s the place where people experience new technologies and a sense of modernity.”

Deborah Sugg Ryan, Professor of Design History and Theory

The six part podcast series will be released weekly starting from 16 August. Professor Sugg Ryan features alongside kitchen designer Johnny Grey, disability campaigner Katie Pennick and food writer Ruby Tandoh as they explore the past, present and potential future of the British kitchen. 

Ruby Tandoh, author of Eat Up, who appears alongside Professor Sugg Ryan in Trophy Cabinets said “I was always very aware of the limitations of the kitchens we can end up in. Sometimes by chance, and sometimes by bad luck as well.”

The series which is written, produced and hosted by Lucy Dearlove, is being released alongside a print zine featuring original essays and illustrations on the subject of the kitchen.

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