Out of the lab and into the local: Portsmouth pubs host worldwide science festival

Pint of Science

14 scientists will take to the stage at venues in Portsmouth this month as part of the world’s largest celebration of public science talks.

  • 03 May 2022
  • 4 min read
  • World’s largest celebration of science talks coming to Portsmouth
  • 14 scientists will take to the stage at venues in the city in May
  • Portsmouth joins nearly 500 cities around the world hosting the festival’s 10th anniversary events

14 scientists will take to the stage at venues in Portsmouth this month as part of the world’s largest celebration of public science talks.

Pint of Science has gathered researchers from the University of Portsmouth and Historic England for events at The Southsea Village and The Barley Mow pubs between 9–11 May.

The festival has grown significantly since its founding in 2012, and aims to give people a unique opportunity to see science up close and personal in a relaxed and informal environment.

An exciting line-up of talks and demonstrations has been set up in Portsmouth to mark the 10th anniversary, that includes Thinking It’s All Over, Mindful Matters, Age Old Behaviours, A Picture of Health, and Treasure or Trash?

They will cover a wide range of topics, from drinking habits during the Covid-19 pandemic, the psychology of penalty kicks, and some people will even get the opportunity to sample a vodka produced from the Chernobyl area (safe to drink of course!).

Pint of Science events are a fantastic way that scientists can discuss and explain our work in an intimate and relaxed environment.

Dr Matt Parker, Reader in Neuroscience and Psychopharmacology

Speaker Dr Matt Parker, from the School of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, said: “The UK taxpayer pays a lot of money to fund science, but sometimes the work can seem completely alien to the public.

“Pint of Science events are a fantastic way that scientists can discuss and explain our work in an intimate and relaxed environment.

“In my event, I will be talking about how we’ve used a small freshwater fish to understand the fragility of memory, and how exploiting this could help us treat memory problems in the future.”

Dr Praveen Paul, Pint of Science Co-Founder, said: “This is our tenth Pint of Science festival and it’s great to be back with in-person events, collaborating with such dedicated volunteers across the country who have been working hard to bring you a variety of topics.

“The programme in each city is packed full of events, which will inspire, challenge and encourage us all to be curious. The only difficulty is choosing which of the brilliant events to go to!”


Tickets for the Pint of Science events are only £5 and can be purchased here.

 

Speakers include:

Dr Matt Parker will delve into how fish are changing the way we think about memory

James Clay will aim to answer the question of who was drinking more during the Covid-19 pandemic and why

Harry Ramsey will pitch how psychology can be as important as physical fitness on the pitch

Dr Paul Conway on explore how doctors and the public view medical sacrifices during the Covid-19 pandemic

Dr Ed Morrison will host a series of demonstrations that showcase the hidden strengths and weaknesses of the mind

Dr Sam Robson will describe some of the unique ways in which DNA research is enriching our understanding of the world

Dr Eszter Somogyi will explore why children act more prosocially towards certain partners or groups than others

Kate Lewis will discuss the potential causes of stereotypic behaviours, how they relate to brain function and cognition and what they tell us about an animal's welfare

Christina Scott will look at Legionella, a freshwater bacterium found almost everywhere in the environment, and the potential consequences of flushing it away

Professor Jim Smith will discuss the health and environmental risks of radioactivity based on his extensive experience of working on the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident

Dr Catherine Mottram will explore the geological processes that form gold and explain why gold is still as important to us today as it was over a hundred years ago