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Monetary Policy research

Explore our research in monetary policy, one of our 4 areas of expertise in Economics


Monetary policy is a central bank's actions to influence how much money is in the economy and how much it costs to borrow, with the aim of keeping inflation low and stable. Since the financial crisis of 2007 and 2008, central banks around the world have taken extreme monetary policy measures to recover the pre-crash dynamism of their economies.

Our research aims to develop new financial and economic theories. This allows us to assess the impacts of monetary policy measures on and via the financial markets, and on indicators in the economy.

Our research covers the following topics


  • Decision-making on stock and housing market regimes
  • How stock and oil markets are affected by uncertainty about macroeconomic policy
  • The merits of measures of consumer confidence for the purpose of forecasting the growth of household consumption expenditure
  • Central banks’ economic and institutional characteristics
  • The correlation between monetary policy and economic growth
  • The interaction between central banks and the financial market

Methods

Our research includes empirical and theoretical work, and uses quantitative research methods, such as regressions and political economy. 

Funders and publications

Our research has been funded by the Great Britain Sasakawa Foundation and the Toshiba International Foundation, and published in the Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money; Economics Letters; Journal of Economic Issues; Applied Economics; European Journal of Finance; and the International Review of Financial Analysis.

Publication highlights

Discover our areas of expertise

Monetary policy is 1 of our 4 areas of expertise in our Economics research area – explore the others below.

Research groups

We're undertaking cutting-edge research ranging from microeconomic level analysis of individual decision making, to global macroeconomic and monetary interactions.

Interested in a PhD in Economics?

Browse our postgraduate research degrees – including PhDs and MPhils – at our Economics postgraduate research degrees page.

 

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