Humanities Shoot; 17th June 2019

Modern Languages BA (Hons)

Study one language, immersing yourself in the culture, history and identity of the communities that speak it, in practical classes and on a year abroad.

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Key information

UCAS code:

R902

Typical offer:

96-104 UCAS points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

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On this BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree course, you'll study one language in-depth, immersing yourself in the culture, history and identity of the communities that speak it. In an increasingly global world, equip yourself with the ability to connect with millions of people in their native language.

You'll have the choice to work towards fluency in one of the following languages:

  • French – spoken by 267 million people worldwide
  • German – spoken by 135 million people worldwide
  • Spanish – spoken by 543 million people worldwide
  • Mandarin Chinese – spoken by 1,120 million people worldwide

Boost your language and cultural studies with a year abroad on a study or work placement, in a country or region that speaks your chosen language. Previous students have experienced life in Germany, Spain, China, Taiwan, Latin America and Senegal.

Wherever you choose to go, this course and the year abroad will transform your passion for language into practical multilingual skills you can use to build your career in any field – from teaching to international management and finance, or media and marketing.

Course highlights 

  • Take a work or study abroad placement in year three, to fully absorb the history and culture of another country and develop the skills and experience you need to build a career across borders
  • Put your language skills into practice through subtitling and translation scenarios, and making your own TV reports
  • Opt to focus on the aspects of other countries that fascinate you – from their history and politics, through to economics and business
  • Join the optional Teacher Training pathway to launch a career as a Modern Foreign Language teacher 
  • Take advantage of our Institution-Wide Language Programme and learn an additional foreign language for free as part of your degree, choosing from Arabic, British Sign Language, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin or Spanish
  • Choose to mix and match optional modules, or tailor your course by selecting modules specifically within one of four specialisms:
  • teaching and education
  • translation and interpreting
  • culture and linguistics
  • business and industry

Options to customise your degree

Take steps to become a teacher while developing your passion for languages.

You can combine your language studies with teacher training and school teaching placements by taking the Qualified Teacher Status (QTS) pathway.

If successful, you'll save an extra year of study, get a £9,000 bursary in your final year of study and gain Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), which will enable you to teach languages in secondary schools in England and Wales after you graduate.

Choose your language course

Studying languages at university can open up the world to you, but how do you decide which course is best for you? Meet some of our students and academics, and learn more about our three undergraduate language degrees.

Illijana: Languages, I believe are an essential skill in today's world. We live in an increasingly globalised society, and the more you travel, the more you realise that just one language isn't enough.

Maxine: The three different language courses at the University of Portsmouth are Modern Languages, Applied Languages and Language Studies.

For modern languages, if I was doing Spain, I could learn about South American countries and Franco's dictatorship, so I got a lot more background knowledge.

Illijana: It introduces you to all the skills that are involved with languages such as translation, interpreting, teaching and general cultural knowledge.

DeAvyon: It's called Applied Languages, everything that languages would be applied to, you learn how to function in that world.

We get to learn how we would apply in the workplace, how to function as a foreigner in another country, as well as focusing on the languages and the cultures themselves.

Jack: The course that I'm studying is Language Studies, and in that I'm looking at multiple different modules, looking at written discourse, spoken discourse, different types of English and different aspects of language.

Marjorie Huet-Martin: Students on the course can choose to specialise in different areas.

They can choose to specialise in teaching and education, in translation and interpreting, linguistics and culture, but also in business and industry.

DeAvyon: The thing I love most would most likely be the lecturers themselves.

They're so accommodating and so welcoming.

They provide so much extra information that you wouldn't think that you would need until you hear it.

Sasha Barron:

We're not only teaching students from the book, but we're also immersed in culture, history, business, social affairs, and also music.

Jack: We have things such as the language café.

There's language exchanges within the uni, but also, I think the plethora of literature that the university has available to you to learn about these subjects.

Illijana: As a mature student, I was initially worried about my experience, but it was really inclusive and a friendly environment.

Everyone is definitely very welcoming.

Marjorie: Students on the course have the opportunity to spend a period of time abroad.

DeAvyon: Going on a year abroad is so important. You get to be fully immersed in the culture and the chance to be able to do that as part of my degree is just amazing.

If you put on your CV that you've studied or worked abroad, it just boosts you up above everybody else in the country so much.

If anyone gets the opportunity, you have to take it.

Jack: There are so many career options that have become available to me through doing a language degree.

Marjorie: We have students who have gone into obviously the teaching and the translation and interpreting, but we also have students who go into banking, into fraud investigation.

Some of them become recruitment consultants, education consultants.

They might work in marketing, in digital media, or social media.

Jack: The melting pot that is this degree in terms of module choice really does help you with those careers.

DeAvyon: One of the biggest reasons to come and study at Portsmouth is the amount of socialisation.

I've not really ever felt alone in Portsmouth, which is really nice.

Just as a uni as well, they offer so much to do and so many opportunities as well, which I really love. Portsmouth really gets you involved.

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

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This course is available through Clearing.

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If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

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Student accommodation

Guaranteed accommodation

Apply now and you'll be offered a guaranteed room in halls if you accept your offer within 48 hours of receiving it.

Find your new home

Discover how Clearing works

Clearing 2024 opens on 5 July and closes on 21 October

Every year thousands of students find their ideal undergraduate course through Clearing. Clearing matches students who are looking for a different course or university from their original choice, or who are applying for the very first time after 30 June, to courses that universities still have places on.

The majority of people apply through Clearing once they receive their exam results on A level / T level results day (15 August 2024).

You can apply through Clearing if:

  • You don't meet the conditions of your offer for your firm (first) or insurance (second) choice courses
  • Your exam results are better than you expected and you want to change your course or university 
  • You don't hold any offers
  • You've accepted an offer but changed your mind about the course you want to do
  • You're applying for the first time after 30 June 2024 

Find out more on UCAS

Yes, we welcome Clearing applications from international students and you can apply in exactly the same way as UK students do. 

The majority of UK students apply through Clearing once they receive their A level / T level results in August 2024, so as an international student if you already have your exam results you can apply when Clearing opens. 

Make sure that you have time to get your visa, funding, and English language certification sorted out before the beginning of term.

If you would like further information or guidance, please contact our international office for advice. 

The entry requirements for courses can change in Clearing but if you want an idea of what grades we usually accept, take a look at our undergraduate course pages.

Even if you don't quite meet the entry requirements, we'd still encourage you to apply as you could still get a place.

Book your place at our summer Open Day

Yes, join us on campus Saturday 6 July 2024, 8.30am-4pm

Book your place

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

Entry requirements

BA (Hons) Modern Languages entry requirements

Typical offers

  • A levels - BCC-CCC
  • UCAS points - 96-104 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DMM-MMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers

  • A levels - BCC-CCC
  • UCAS points - 96-104 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DMM-MMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects or GCSEs - see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

Alternative language courses

Explore all our language undergraduate courses, so you can compare your options and apply for the best course for you.

  BA (Hons) Modern Languages BA (Hons) Applied Languages BA (Hons) Language Studies
Languages you'll study 1 (at either advanced or beginner level) 2 (both at advanced level, or 1 at advanced and 1 as a beginner) 1 or 2 (both at advanced level, or 1 at advanced and 1 as a beginner)
Duration 4 years 4 years 3 or 4 years
Study abroad Optional
Language A Level required    
Find out more   Go to course page Go to course page
Interpreting Training Suite

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Which language degree is your best fit?

Unsure which language degree to choose? Take our quick and easy quiz to find out which of our language courses is best suited to you.

 

Take the quiz 

Facilities and specialist equipment

Facilities for Applied and Modern Languages courses

Develop the skills needed as an interpreter or translator in our Conference Interpreter Suite – equipped with the same technology used in the European Parliament.

Learn more

Carmen, Senior Lecturer in Interpreting and Spanish

Interpreting is a module that we offer in all of our courses at the University of Portsmouth.

As part of this modules tudents get to take their language skills up to the next level.

The interpreting suite actually offers an outstanding opportunity for our students to actually put their interpreting skills into practice in a very real context.

Toby, Bethan and Matias

Qualities a student would need to succeed in this topic: perseverance, communication, preparation, teamwork and passion about interpreting and the interpretation world.

What I love about interpreting is how much it’s challenging my language skills. I want to be able to facilitate people to integrate into a culture, to make friends, to be able to work, to be able to socialise.

It’s a really safe introduction to interpreting.

This module really pushes me to actually use my Spanish very spontaneously. It encourages the learning of new vocabulary and just to think a little bit outside. You have to think on your feet. It forces you to become good, it keeps you on top!

The interpreting module was one of the main reasons why I came to Portsmouth. I think it really defines well the concept of communication.

You’ll be pushed so much, you’ll learn so much and at the end of the day you’ll have fun! Just trust your command of the language and roll with it!

Digital language laboratories

Perfect your listening and comprehension skills in a rich, multi-media language learning environment. Find out how to integrate and manipulate video, sound, text and internet sources in different languages.

digital language lab
Explore the laboratories

Careers and opportunities

As early as 2014, UK Trade and Investment reported that the UK's lack of language skills was leading to a 3.5% loss in national income through trade. This highlights the need UK companies have for bilingual and multilingual employees.

Fast forward to a post-pandemic 2021, the opportunity to work remotely from anywhere in the world has dramatically increased and globalization of trade continues to grow (according to the DHL Global Connectedness Index). The professional language skills you develop on this course could set you apart in a global job market, whether you plan to work in the UK after graduation or pursue a career abroad.

Both within and beyond Europe, we will need to reach out beyond English, not only to maintain and improve our economic position but to build trust, deepen international influence and cultural relationships, and to keep our country safe.

British Council, Languages for the Future (2017)

Read the report

What jobs can you do with a modern languages degree?

Roles you could go onto include:

  • bilingual consultant
  • multilingual project coordinator translator
  • translator/interpreter
  • diplomat
  • journalist
  • tourist guide
  • market analyst

What areas can you work in with a modern languages degree?

This degree broadens your options so you can pursue almost any career. Learning a second language is useful in all sectors, including:

  • marketing
  • journalism and the media
  • international management
  • translation and interpreting
  • teaching
  • tourism
  • finance

You could also continue your studies at postgraduate level with a Master's in a subject such as Translation Studies or Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

Female student at computer

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

My degree has given me the confidence to travel and work abroad. I am now in Beijing to complete a MA in European and Asian Affairs.

Jan Chodorowski, BA (Hons) Modern Languages student

Year abroad

After your second year, you'll do a work or study abroad placement based in one or more countries where your chosen language is spoken. The experience abroad will help you build linguistic and cultural fluency that will help you stand out to employers when you graduate.

We'll give you all the support you need before your year abroad to find a work or study abroad placement fits your aspirations. You can take advantage of our links with universities and employers worldwide, including Germany, Spain, China, Taiwan, Latin America and Senegal.

You'll continue to get mentoring and support from us throughout your year abroad, to help you get the most out of your experience.

I had the most fantastic experience on this course. I went to study abroad... which completed my course perfectly and initiated the path into my career. It was the most perfect opportunity.

Lauren Cooper , BA (Hons) Combined Modern Languages student

Why study abroad?

Experience another culture. Learn another language. Develop a network of international contacts. There are so many reasons to study abroad as part of your degree.

Meet students from our Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, who have studied abroad in countries such as France, Japan and Senegal.

Zianne: Theres so many good things about studying abroad. 

Tamarra: It's really hard to list all the skills and all the value that it brings because really it makes you such a well-rounded individual.

Sorina Toltica: All humanities and social sciences courses have got the option to study abroad. This includes the United States of America, France, Spain, Japan, Australia, and we are also developing some partnerships within the African continent.

Zianne: Through my year abroad, I was able to develop a lot of resilience and being able to adapt because when you're not speaking your own language, you kind of have to adapt every single day and you can't just give up. You just have to keep going. 

Tamarra: There is a little bit of pressure, obviously, since we're in a new environment. I remember getting off the airplane and seeing the Czech language and I just thought to myself, How am I going to get through this? But in the university and here they offer Czech language courses for beginners. You meet other international students who are on the same boat as you. You guys can just come together and explore it yourself. 

Zianne: I met loads of people from around Europe who are also on Erasmus, so now I have friends from Norway, Germany and Croatia that I probably would have never met if I wasn't in Salamanca at that particular time.

Tamarra: My flatmates are from France, Norway, from Belgium, Hungary. We've always had these monthly dinners together where we try out each country's cuisine and traditional foods. 

Charlie: It's helped me to understand people better, it’s helped grow my confidence, helped grow my independence. 

Bethan: The most valuable thing that its brought me has been an appreciation of a completely different way of thinking. You learn to appreciate that there is value and beauty in different ways of thinking, even if you don't agree with it. 

Tamarra: You really have to immerse yourself into that country to get the full experience.

Bethan: I have always felt supported by the university. When I was abroad, I knew that I could contact my personal tutor. There are so many services there and I knew theyre always available. 

Charlie: They helped me with the application. They helped me find the opportunities in the country that I wanted to study in. 

Zianne: I also benefited from speaking to the wellbeing team whilst I was out there because that is still on offer to you, which I really appreciated.

Tamarra: All the students should study abroad because not only is it good for friendships and for memories, but in terms of the future in your careers, you can also get a lot more confidence. 

Charlie: Coming out here you really realise how big the world is, how many people there are, how many different stories people have. I think it really just opens your eyes to the possibilities that you have available to you.

Sorina Toltica: One of the biggest differences in my students before and after they come from study abroad. It's their adaptability and resilience and knowledge of the world and their excitement about possibly going back. 

Bethan: If I was to give some advice to someone considering going to study abroad, I would just say do it. Doing the year abroad with the University of Portsmouth has opened up so many career opportunities for me, and I wouldn't be where I am today without them.

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

What you'll study

Core modules

We'll guide you through using university resources like the library and Moodle while familiarising you with processes like ethics approval and referencing. You’ll get hands-on with collecting, examining, and presenting language data.

You’ll develop professional skills like teamwork, time management and resilience as you take the first steps towards becoming an independent researcher.

You’ll analyse the syntactic, lexical, functional and phonological elements of English, building your understanding of pedagogic grammar.

You’ll also have a go at learning a previously unknown language and reflect on this experience, as well as making contrasts between this language and known languages.

You’ll examine the processes through which nations are constructed, imagined and reinvented in countries and regions where French, German, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese are spoken.

You’ll think critically about how ethnicity, shared values and collective memory can be selectively used, and in some cases created, to generate a 'national identity'.

You’ll also examine how language affects identity, the invention and use of national icons, film as act of historical memory and commemoration, and migration and social integration.

Optional modules

You’ll focus on speaking and writing for tourism, travel and business, and learn through films, songs, conversations and cultural tips.

You’ll build language accuracy and confidence by presenting information and ideas, helping you become an independent and collaborative language learner.

You’ll focus on speaking and writing for tourism, travel and business, and learn through films, songs, conversations and cultural tips.

You’ll build language accuracy and confidence by presenting information and ideas, helping you become an independent and collaborative language learner.

You’ll focus on speaking and writing for tourism, travel and business, and learn through films, songs, conversations and cultural tips.

You’ll build language accuracy and confidence by presenting information and ideas, helping you become an independent and collaborative language learner.

You’ll focus on speaking and writing for tourism, travel and business, and learn through films, songs, conversations and cultural tips.

You’ll build language accuracy and confidence by presenting information and ideas, helping you become an independent and collaborative language learner.

You’ll focus on grammar, writing, reading and listening. Through listening, you'll obtain information on familiar and unfamiliar topics from audio sources. You'll learn to use formal and informal French with accuracy and cultural competence in conversations.

You’ll also produce writing that describes and comments upon present, past and future events.

You’ll focus on grammar, writing, reading and listening. Through listening, you'll obtain information on familiar and unfamiliar topics from audio sources. You'll learn to use formal and informal German with accuracy and cultural competence in conversations.

You’ll also produce writing that describes and comments upon present, past and future events.

You’ll focus on grammar, writing, reading and listening. Through listening, you'll obtain information on familiar and unfamiliar topics from audio sources. You'll learn to use formal and informal Mandarin with accuracy and cultural competence in conversations.

You’ll also produce writing that describes and comments upon present, past and future events.

You’ll focus on grammar, writing, reading and listening. Through listening, you'll obtain information on familiar and unfamiliar topics from audio sources. You'll learn to use formal and informal Spanish with accuracy and cultural competence in conversations.

You’ll also produce writing that describes and comments upon present, past and future events.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in French.

You’ll use diverse French source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on French cultural, social or current affairs.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in German.

You’ll use diverse German source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on German cultural, social or current affairs.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in Spanish. You’ll use diverse Spanish source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on Spanish cultural, social or current affairs.

Through seminars on authentic texts, you'll develop skills for comprehending written and spoken French on diverse topics. Building grammar, vocabulary, and fluency, you'll discuss current events, share opinions, and present ideas - all in French.

Engaging with specialist academic texts boosts your academic literacy, and by reading complex materials, writing accurately, and expressing yourself orally with nuance, you'll gain practical French abilities.

Through seminars on authentic texts, you'll develop skills for comprehending written and spoken German on diverse topics. Building grammar, vocabulary, and fluency, you'll discuss current events, share opinions, and present ideas - all in German.

Engaging with specialist academic texts boosts your academic literacy, and by reading complex materials, writing accurately, and expressing yourself orally with nuance, you'll gain practical German abilities.
 

Through seminars on authentic texts, you'll develop skills for comprehending written and spoken Spanish on diverse topics. Building grammar, vocabulary, and fluency, you'll discuss current events, share opinions, and present ideas - all in Spanish.

Engaging with specialist academic texts boosts your academic literacy, and by reading complex materials, writing accurately, and expressing yourself orally with nuance, you'll gain practical Spanish abilities.
 

Optional modules

Through films, news reports and texts from across the Francophone world, discuss engaging topics from travel adventures to current affairs.

You’ll learn to communicate naturally in academic, professional and social situations while appreciating linguistic nuances. You’ll also deepen your understanding of diverse French-speaking societies through lively classes and seminars.

Through films, news reports and texts from across the German-speaking world, discuss engaging topics from travel adventures to current affairs.

You’ll learn to communicate naturally in academic, professional and social situations while appreciating linguistic nuances. You’ll also deepen your understanding of diverse German-speaking societies through lively classes and seminars.

Through films, news reports and texts from across the Mandarin-speaking world, discuss engaging topics from travel adventures to current affairs.

You’ll learn to communicate naturally in academic, professional and social situations while appreciating linguistic nuances. You’ll also deepen your understanding of diverse Mandarin-speaking societies through lively classes and seminars.

Through films, news reports and texts from across the Spanish-speaking world, discuss engaging topics from travel adventures to current affairs.

You’ll learn to communicate naturally in academic, professional and social situations while appreciating linguistic nuances. You’ll also deepen your understanding of diverse Spanish-speaking societies through lively classes and seminars.

You’ll hone your French speaking through debates, presentations and interviews, and refine your formal and informal writing across diverse genres.

You’ll also deepen your cultural understanding through exposure to sociolinguistic nuances and conventions, ready to communicate effectively in French-speaking communities worldwide.

You’ll hone your German speaking through debates, presentations and interviews, and refine your formal and informal writing across diverse genres.

You’ll also deepen your cultural understanding through exposure to sociolinguistic nuances and conventions, ready to communicate effectively in German-speaking communities worldwide.

You’ll hone your Mandarin speaking through debates, presentations and interviews, and refine your formal and informal writing across diverse genres.

You’ll also deepen your cultural understanding through exposure to sociolinguistic nuances and conventions, ready to communicate effectively in Mandarin-speaking communities worldwide.

You’ll hone your Spanish speaking through debates, presentations and interviews, and refine your formal and informal writing across diverse genres.

You’ll also deepen your cultural understanding through exposure to sociolinguistic nuances and conventions, ready to communicate effectively in Spanish-speaking communities worldwide.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in Mandarin.

You’ll use diverse Mandarin source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on Mandarin cultural, social or current affairs.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in French.

You’ll use diverse French source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on French cultural, social or current affairs.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in German.

You’ll use diverse German source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on German cultural, social or current affairs.

Supported by independent study and a series of language seminars, you'll develop a journalist article in Spanish.

You’ll use diverse Spanish source material for your project, from written to audio-visual, and take part in individual and group presentations on Spanish cultural, social or current affairs.

You’ll deepen your understanding of workplace culture and practices in French-speaking countries, boosting your communication and intercultural competence through activities like job interviews, team reports, and presentations.

Gain insights into French job opportunities, company structures, products and services through research, and produce a multimedia report on a company using specialised vocabulary and software.

You’ll deepen your understanding of workplace culture and practices in German-speaking countries, boosting your communication and intercultural competence through activities like job interviews, team reports, and presentations.

Gain insights into German job opportunities, company structures, products and services through research, and produce a multimedia report on a company using specialised vocabulary and software.

You’ll deepen your understanding of workplace culture and practices in Spanish-speaking countries, boosting your communication and intercultural competence through activities like job interviews, team reports, and presentations.

Gain insights into Spanish job opportunities, company structures, products and services through research, and produce a multimedia report on a company using specialised vocabulary and software.

Moving beyond everyday French, you'll analyse complex texts from media, literature, and academia and with class discussions in French on specialist topics related to living abroad you’ll hone your verbal fluency.

Building on your existing abilities, you'll communicate confidently, express opinions, and present ideas. This module provides the advanced language abilities, critical thinking, and intercultural competence to thrive in diverse French-speaking contexts.

You'll learn how to discuss specialist topics in a variety of subject areas by analysing a range of authentic written, audio and visual media and expand your verbal fluency.

By learning to write confidently in formal and informal styles, you'll build your understanding of complex German across diverse contexts and sharpen your ability to express yourself confidently.

Seminars on grammar, reading, writing, listening and speaking provide a toolkit to thrive in German-speaking communities.

You'll learn how to discuss specialist topics in a variety of subject areas by analysing a range of authentic written, audio and visual media and expand your verbal fluency.

By learning to write confidently in formal and informal styles, you'll build your understanding of complex Spanish across diverse contexts and sharpen your ability to express yourself confidently.

Seminars on grammar, reading, writing, listening and speaking provide a toolkit to thrive in Spanish-speaking communities.

The module gives you the keys to understand how decisions are made in the EU, and the extent to which member states can shape, respond or contest EU decisions.

Exploring real-world issues like migration, defence, or environmental policies, you'll learn to critically evaluate debates and policies, and how the EU interacts with other states (such as the UK or China) and international organisations (such as NATO).

With the historical and theoretical background provided, you'll be able to discuss trends and engage intelligently with current affairs.

You’ll begin by exploring how countries like Argentina, Chile and Brazil transitioned from military dictatorships to democracies towards the end of the 20th century.

You’ll also learn about the dramatic public protests and negotiations that eventually toppled these dictatorships in the late 20th century as part of the "Third Wave" of democratisation.

However, installing democratic systems has not been easy - you’ll also analyse the political, economic and social challenges that societies across the region are grappling with in the 21st century. To what extent have the region's new democracies been able to challenge deep seated inequalities in class, gender and race/ethnicity? And what do ordinary people think about development and democracy across the region?

You’ll explore ideas around modernisation, colonialism and nationalism and how they shape education, gender roles, ethnicity, class, sexuality and everyday life in this part of the world.

By comparing the experiences of different countries when it comes to industrialisation, democratisation and conflict, you’ll learn how to appreciate complex regional dynamics.

You’ll go beyond vocabulary and assess why we say things the way we do, looking for patterns in everyday language.

You’ll develop practical text analysis skills, and examine language as a tool we use to accomplish social goals.

Combining law, language analysis and psychology, you’ll look at the different tools and methods used for analysing texts.

You’ll investigate grammar, orthography, metaphor, punctuation, capitalisation, layout and text management, salutations, spelling and distinctive markers, style of printing, and the use of upper-case letters.

You’ll also explore the different methods used for detecting lies and deception, and apply forensic linguistics tools in written and verbal case reports.

You’ll get familiar with the big issues and contemporary debates in education studies as well as the role and expectations of a teacher.

You’ll develops fundamental knowledge and skills that teachers require, as well as your capability to structure and critique a lesson plan.

We’ll cover various aspects of social (in)justice, and you’ll then choose an area you feel passionate about to investigate further, explaining links between language and social justice in your chosen domain.

You’ll capture and convey your insights through a digital portfolio.

Via engaging lectures, seminars and workshops, you'll explore key HRM concepts from recruitment and selection, to performance management and employment equality.

You'll also examine real-world case studies to reveal the importance of linking HR activities to a business's organisational outcomes.

Through group presentations and peer teaching with your fellow students, you'll build confidence using HRM terminology in order to communicate effectively as a HR professional or with others in this role.

You’ll study a number of key topics and issues in the field of language acquisition and their implications for your own personal and professional interests and needs in language learning, language teaching, and language studies.

Through dynamic peer discussions, you’ll rethink assumptions about multilingualism while gaining tools to evaluate language policies and learning models.

Although this module focuses on the teaching of English, it can apply to other languages too.

If you’re doing the Trinity course, this is the second of three modules you’ll need to complete to achieve the internationally recognised professional teaching qualification, Trinity College London Cert TESOL.

On this module, you’ll get an introduction to translation skills to open new worlds.

You’ll learn practical techniques while translating authentic texts, explore different genres and languages and discuss real-world translation challenges. You’ll develop professional skills for potential careers in this field.

You’ll study real speech and linguistic data to understand different linguistic deficit models.

You’ll build on what you’ve learned about morphology, syntax and phonology and apply it to real examples.

Learn by doing as you explain your findings to different audiences through creative mediums like podcasts.

In this module, you’ll explore European colonisation of Africa, asking questions like - how did they justify colonial rule, and how did African peoples respond to these colonisers?

You’ll learn how, after World War II, colonial rule was increasingly challenged from both within the empire, by growing African demands for political rights, and in the international arena, with the global trend towards trusteeship, development and self-determination.

You’ll also explore European relations with Africa in the post-colonial era, looking at themes which may include ideas about civilisation, universalism and race, modern attempts to 'rehabilitate' empire in the media, and the legacies of colonialism in Britain, Europe and Africa.

You’ll collaborate with students on other courses to explore and address societal and environmental challenges faced by local and global communities. You’ll choose projects from a range of topic areas aligned with the university's Civic Strategy.

With input from local organisations, you’ll think about your topic from multiple perspectives, developing your interdisciplinary thinking and ability to work with others.

You’ll analyse the essence of security, exploring how security needs are addressed around the world and on a national level, down to a community and even an individual basis.

You’ll explore different forms of societal risk and insecurity, and approaches to dealing with security threats, taking into account the nature and impact of economic and political developments.

You'll learn how to think critically about the key concepts that link language, culture and communication, considering the benefits and limitations of these ideas.

You'll explore the different ways in which communication intersects with culture across themes such as identity, education, gender, and the media.

Alongside what you learn, you'll improve your skills in analysis, research and intercultural awareness.

Apply cultural theories in real business scenarios through group projects and develop your communication skills with a global mindset via vibrant discussions.

This module will equip you with cultural awareness, analytical abilities and presentation skills to thrive.

You'll learn about consumer behaviour and brand strategy, and spend time examining real-world marketing campaigns. You'll also think about how social, political and technological forces can affect the way businesses approach marketing their products and services.

Skills you'll develop include carrying out market research and learning how to use what you learn, crafting targeted messaging across different marketing channels, and presenting your ideas verbally and in writing.

You'll learn about major economic, political and cultural changes in Western Europe over the nineteenth century, and how these affected the rest of the world as time went on.

You'll explore the big ideas that have shaped the modern world, and weigh up the benefits and perils of globalisation. Skills you'll develop on this module include independent research, critical thinking and effective communication.

You'll also learn to understand the opportunities and challenges of today's world from an informed, global perspective.

You’ll look critically ideas of nationalism historically and today with a focus on the everyday, intimate and embodied boundaries of nation-states and how these shape our lives, including those of us living in the most privileged parts of the world.

You’ll explore real-world cases to understand the individual and societal impacts on human lives, developing your analytical skills and imagining more compassionate alternatives.

You’ll unpack the language of tabloids, broadsheets and online news, analysing how journalists shape public understanding of current events.

Develop your critical thinking by confronting moral panics and polarised politics in reporting.

Create your own news stories and gain real insight into mass communication in a rapidly changing landscape.

You'll analyse major cases of economic crime and weigh up their wider societal implications.

You'll also learn how to recognise disciplinary perspectives, become familiar with the key investigating organisations, identify investigative techniques, and gather and analyse real case information.

With a minimum 80-hour commitment, you’ll apply what you’ve learned so far on your degree to real-world professional settings within our community of local businesses, social enterprises, and third-sector organisations.

You’ll have support from interactive workshops, tutorials, and guest speaker events, encouraging you to set achievable professional goals and evolve your professional identity.

You’ll analyse American texts against the backdrop of intellectual, social and political change, evaluating how writers grappled with emerging ideas around national identity, race, gender and more.

By honing skills for contextual analysis and independent thought, you’ll form your own interpretations of iconic works that reflect the American experience.

You’ll analyse diverse transitional justice approaches balancing community healing and judicial accountability after mass atrocities.

Comparing mechanisms like war crimes tribunals, truth commissions and reparations programmes, you’ll evaluate effectiveness in restoring dignity and preventing recurrence.

With case studies from Europe to Africa, from Latin America to Asia, you'll examine tensions between western models and local cultural perspectives, assessing what ‘justice’ means to vulnerable peoples.

Throughout, you'll trace incremental human rights legislation advances, assessing global institutions’ roles protecting civilians from authoritarian regimes and wartime abuses.

You’ll learn skills you’ll need to teach in language schools worldwide, including exploring different methods and approaches to the teaching of languages, in particular English as a Second or Other Language (ESOL).

You’ll design a series of lesson plans and reflect upon your own performance as a trainee teacher, drawing up an action plan for future professional development.

Through interactive lectures with academics, speakers and professionals, you'll discuss, debate and complete practical exercises exploring wildlife crime alongside your classmates.

You'll spend time examining wildlife crimes and the factors behind them, as well as environmental justice and sustainability.

You’ll explore the professional aspects of these services, learning about opportunities, challenges and training requirements. You’ll also try the core skills for yourself, from post-editing translations to voiceover work.

Analyse the artistic, political, and economic aspects of films in postcolonialism and global cinema. Critically examine different themes and the methods filmmakers use. Understanding the evolution of film production, you’ll learn about the impact of technology on movies both locally and internationally. By looking at how films are distributed and marketed, you’ll learn about the impact of global politics on how films are received.

You’ll come to understand international films deeply, developing cultural knowledge.

This understanding will enhance your analytical abilities, which are useful for jobs in film programming, curating, and reviewing.

Core modules

Living and learning in your chosen country where your language of study is spoken, you'll improve your language skills and develop your cross-cultural understanding.

With international experience, you'll develop your subject knowledge, analytical abilities and self-confidence.

Fresh perspectives and a global outlook will mean you'll return home prepared for the next steps in your degree and your career.

Optional modules

It's up to you what your dissertation or project is about – this will be your chance to showcase your passion for language by choosing a subject area or topic that most interests you.

You'll draw on everything you’ve learned so far to investigate, analyse, craft and refine your dissertation or project, using existing texts, sources and artefacts to support your arguments and give them context.

You'll have the support of a dedicated dissertation tutor to guide you throughout this module.

This real-world, project-based module lets you address an identified need or gap by designing an innovative product, service or resource.

With support from university staff and external partners, you'll demonstrate critical thinking, ethical awareness and project management abilities.

Your final project and presentation will showcase your employability and capacity for high-impact solutions.

By understanding authentic texts and media in diverse tones and registers, you'll gain broad exposure to regional variations.

Through dynamic discussions and academic presentations in advanced French, you'll build your verbal fluency on current issues and hone your writing skills across formal and informal styles, as your express nuanced ideas with accuracy.

Graduate with the advanced French proficiency, analytical abilities, and cross-cultural competence to communicate effectively across your degree and career.

By understanding authentic texts and media in diverse tones and registers, you'll gain broad exposure to regional variations. Through dynamic discussions and academic presentations in advanced German, you'll build your verbal fluency on current issues and hone your writing skills across formal and informal styles, as your express nuanced ideas with accuracy.

Graduate with the advanced German proficiency, analytical abilities, and cross-cultural competence to communicate effectively across your degree and career.

By understanding authentic texts and media in diverse tones and registers, you'll gain broad exposure to regional variations. Through dynamic discussions and academic presentations in advanced Italian, you'll build your verbal fluency on current issues and hone your writing skills across formal and informal styles, as your express nuanced ideas with accuracy. Graduate with the advanced Italian proficiency, analytical abilities, and cross-cultural competence to communicate effectively across your degree and career.

By understanding authentic texts and media in diverse tones and registers, you'll gain broad exposure to regional variations.

Through dynamic discussions and academic presentations in advanced Mandarin, you'll build your verbal fluency on current issues and hone your writing skills across formal and informal styles, as your express nuanced ideas with accuracy.

Graduate with the advanced Mandarin proficiency, analytical abilities, and cross-cultural competence to communicate effectively across your degree and career.

 

By understanding authentic texts and media in diverse tones and registers, you'll gain broad exposure to regional variations.

Through dynamic discussions and academic presentations in advanced Spanish, you'll build your verbal fluency on current issues and hone your writing skills across formal and informal styles, as your express nuanced ideas with accuracy.

Graduate with the advanced Spanish proficiency, analytical abilities, and cross-cultural competence to communicate effectively across your degree and career.

Working in groups with other taking your language combination (French/English, German/English, Mandarin/English or Spanish/English), you’ll complete exercises and tasks aimed at developing and improving your skills in public speaking, speech analysis and synthesis, memory and note-taking techniques, vocabulary reactivation, speech reformulation and communication.

You’ll also create and maintain a blog to review your own practice, your peers' practice and how theory underpins practice.

You’ll work again in groups separated by language combination to undertake interpreting training supported by speech analysis and delivery, memory and note-taking, vocabulary, reformulation and communication exercises.

Specifically, you'll demonstrate actively listening to general and specialised speech and show well-developed, real-life communication skills.

You'll learn how to analyse various genres of source texts, apply translation techniques and translation theory in a way that helps you to achieve clear meaning, and produce commercially acceptable translations.

Working with your fellow students, you’ll simulate real-world translation agency environments and learn how to produce translations as a team.

You'll also work on your skills in written and verbal communication, critical analysis and intercultural awareness, all of which are essential for a career in the language services sector.

You’ll demonstrate intellectual and transferable skills appropriate for your field, and do independent research. You’ll design a viable project proposal using existing studies in your field, and critically discuss assumptions, arguments and data to make judgements, pose questions and identify solutions.

Finally, you'll write up your project tailored to a specified academic or workplace audience.

You’ll bring together new and existing knowledge in business and marketing to generate potential business ideas.

You’ll locate, access and critically engage with market information using digital technologies to collect data for research, demonstrate your understanding of business ethics and sustainability in various cultural contexts, and communicate clearly and effectively to a wide audience, such as banks and potential investors.

You'll investigate words, phrases and their meanings across diverse contexts like Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Natural Language Processing (NLP).

Developing corpus linguistics abilities lets you spot patterns and trends - useful for careers from teaching to computing. Get hands-on with data to uncover language insights, reporting findings with critical methodology grounded in key concepts.

Examine feminist linguistic theories and methodologies investigating how speech and text perpetuate or confront patriarchal norms.

Discover how conversational patterns subtly cue stereotypes, status and gender roles across diverse cultures.

You’ll question your own assumptions while developing skills for respectful communication and critical consumption of gendered media messages.

You'll explore diverse literary perspectives on the Holocaust, from first-hand accounts to contemporary post-memory texts.

Through critical reading and innovative creative projects both in groups and on your own, you'll grapple with the ethics of memorialisation and the role of cultural memory.

You’ll get familiar with the big issues and contemporary debates in education studies as well as the role and expectations of a teacher.

You’ll develops fundamental knowledge and skills that teachers require, as well as your capability to structure and critique a lesson plan.

You'll learn about the job application process from the perspective of both candidates and recruiters, thinking about what employers look for in graduates and how you can optimise your own professional profile.

Through mock interviews and assessments, you'll hone your skills and learn how to communicate your achievements and career goals, ready to take the next step after you graduate.

You’ll build your rhetorical skills to deliver persuasive presentations, and analyse diverse interpersonal interactions, from meetings to interviews, complaints to small talk.

Learn what makes effective workplace discourse and find confidence in your ability to navigate professional spoken communication.

You’ll design a website for a company, charity or NGO in your chosen language, giving you real-world experience in web design, marketing and using your language skills in an international workplace.

You’ll also design a viable project proposal, research the latest information in your field, analyse data to reach conclusions, reflect on your learning, and communicate your findings to a professional audience.

From theories and models to business cultures and current affairs, you'll analyse international trade trends, regulatory institutions, and the forces shaping competitive business environments.

Examining strategic responses to globalization, you'll develop critical perspectives on corporate responsibility and assess market dynamics across different regions, while crafting insightful solutions that benefits society and the economy.

When you graduate, you'll have the essential knowledge, analytical skills, and global mindset to succeed as a future business leader.

You'll consider how you can incorporate creative activities using music, literature, drama, film, storytelling and games into a series of lessons.

You'll also think about wider contexts and make professional judgements concerning planning beyond individual lessons.

We'll use examples in class relating to the teaching of English but the same principles and techniques can be used for the teaching of other languages too.

You’ll develop your knowledge of core linguistic frameworks in order to investigate a range of communication issues, such as language and control, the role of interpreters, the veracity of witness statements, and the interviewing of vulnerable witnesses, such as children.

You'll explore France's foreign policies, defence strategies and power dynamics within Europe and beyond.

Spend time thinking critically about its international influence and motivations, and learn how other regions of the world view its actions, from 'special' ties with former colonies to controversial stances on key issues.

This module will help you develop the skills to unpack complex geopolitical questions. You'll gain a deeper understanding of France's bid to remain an influential force in our rapidly changing world.

You'll get an overview of the power politics in the region, including China's resurgence, Japan's constraints and the United States' rebalancing.

You'll examine both traditional and non-traditional security issues across the region, from tension on the Korean peninsula, to the human costs of illiberal politics in Southeast Asia.

You’ll focus on the analysis of computer-mediated-communication practices, the language used in on social media, the effects of social media on language and the social structures that emerge when people use these applications.

You’ll delve into the big ideas relating to language and social media to develop your own perspectives.

With a minimum 80-hour commitment, you'll apply what you've learned so far on your degree to real-world professional settings within our community of local businesses, social enterprises, and third-sector organisations.

You'll have support from interactive workshops, tutorials, and guest speaker events, encouraging you to set achievable professional goals and evolve your professional identity.

You'll rethink European (market) integration from the perspective of state, non-state, and regional actors across the globe, focusing on the question of how and to what extent EU institutions and policies have contributed to shaping international economic governance.

Tackling different interpretations of the EU as a regional and global power, you'll explore though-provoking questions: As the EU negotiates new trade deals and economic partnerships, who really benefits? Does the EU attempt to use its global market power to create a safer world? And to what extent have colonial legacies shaped the EU as an economic superpower?

Using analytical frameworks, you'll adapt texts to suit different audiences, purposes and settings, and evaluate and produce examples of professional writing.

You’ll also apply your learning through a presentation.

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • skill development sessions
  • oral practice classes
  • work placement

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

Teaching staff profiles

User profile default icon

Miss Sara Gomez Villa

Senior Teaching Fellow

Sara.Gomez-Villa@port.ac.uk

Read more

How you're assessed

The way you’re assessed may depend on the units you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 30% by exams and 70% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 10% by exams and 90% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 100% by coursework
  • Year 4 students: 10% by exams and 90% by coursework

Your coursework may include:

  • essays
  • use of software including desktop publishing, podcasts, subtitling and web design
  • case studies
  • blogging
  • book reviews
  • professional and business reports
  • group and individual projects
  • oral presentations
  • portfolio of achievement

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Modern Languages degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Student group discussion

Global Café

You can meet students from all over the world at the Global Café on Wednesday afternoons. Learn about other's cultures and practise speaking in each other's languages while making new friends and getting to share your own culture.

Student writing

Language Corner

Meet with a language tutor, get help with specific challenges and practise your skills with proficient speakers of your chosen language in this optional weekly drop-in session.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

 

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

In your third year for your placement abroad, you’ll need to fund the costs of travel, transport and accommodation. The exact costs will depend on the destination. If you're studying at one of our partner universities, you won't need to pay fees at your host institution, but there may be other costs such as visa, insurance or extra tuition. If you choose to work abroad, can help you find an internship, which may be paid or unpaid.

During your placement year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, this discount amounts to 90% of the year’s fees. Placement year tuition fees are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

Enhance your degree with an internationally recognised qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages: the Trinity College London Cert TESOL. This opportunity is conditional on a successful performance in an entry test and interview in order to fulfil professional requirements.

There's no cost if you take the Trinity College London Teaching Practice module as one of your options.

If you choose to take this module outside your planned curriculum, there's a fee of £355.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – R902
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

To start this course in 2025, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – R902
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.