Network of nodes and edges, as used in machine learning

Mathematics with Machine Learning BSc (Hons)

Learn to build machine learning models, and understand the mathematics and algorithms that underpin them. Study theories used in AI, neural networks and Python coding

University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points from 2 or 3 A levels

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
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Overview

Understand the mathematics that underpins artificial intelligence, and develop the skills needed to build machine learning models.

You’ll make yourself vital to an age of artificial intelligence by building invaluable theoretical and practical abilities. You’ll study powerful mathematical concepts and tools, and bring them to bear on subjects like machine learning, neural networks, and Python coding. 

Once you graduate, you’ll be set to enter any of the industries being transformed by AI and machine learning tools. You'll learn how to apply large language models such as ChatGPT, and how to analyse images and other live data coming from sectors such as healthcare, education and business. You'll also be ready to move into roles that rely on mathematical understanding, such as finance or government, or to take up postgraduate study in maths or artificial intelligence.

Course highlights

  • Develop a rounded understanding of modern mathematics, including calculus, linear algebra and probability, with a focus on machine learning tools, theories and methods
  • Apply your learning with modules in programming languages such as Python, Mathematica and R
  • Learn how to use industry standard tools for building machine learning models such as scikit-learn, PyTorch and TensorFlow
  • Study alongside world-class researchers in machine learning and mathematics, in a department placed in the top ten for teaching in the 2022 NSS report
  • Build your career prospects with built-in employability programmes, placement support and careers advice
  • Brush up your skills with our drop-in Maths Cafe and personal tutorial system
     

Maths at Portsmouth — number 8 in the UK for student satisfaction, and the top modern university in the country for research quality

National Student Survey (NSS) 2023 and Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021

Read more about our excellent maths research

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Entry requirements

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BSc (Hons) Mathematics and Machine Learning entry requirements

Typical offers

  • UCAS points - 112-120 points from 2 or 3 A levels, or equivalent, including 40 points from Mathematics. (calculate your UCAS points)
  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • International Baccalaureate - 29

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept at UCAS.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Facilities and specialist software

University of Portsmouth students sat in the Maths Cafe

Maths Café

No problem is too small or too tough for our Maths Café tutors, who are on hand every day during term-time to help you if you get stuck or need something explained.

Learn more about the Maths Café

 Close up of a building, with solar photovoltaic panels covering it

Future Technology Centre, Technology Enhanced Active Learning Space

Develop teamwork and communication skills to prepare you for your graduate job and make yourself more employable, while getting to know your classmates in an informal and friendly environment.

CCI Facilities; June 2019

Computer labs and specialist mathematics software

Learn several specialist programming, symbolic and data handling languages such as Python, Mathematica and R – and work with industry standard tools for building machine learning models, such as scikit-learn, pytorch and tensorflow.

Careers and opportunities

Studying machine learning shows you’re committed to understanding the needs of the growing artificial intelligence sector. Forbes magazine predicts a 71% growth in jobs that need AI or machine learning skills by 2026, and research suggests that the UK will face a skill gap that your knowledge could help fill

You’ll also graduate with a deep understanding of the mathematical principles, theories and methods that make machine learning possible - unlike other degrees in this field, our degree in Mathematics and Machine Learning is designed to give you the underlying understanding that will help you grasp future developments in the sector.

Additionally, your mathematical study will make you employable in sectors beyond machine learning, as you’ll be able to show your readiness for careers in finance, analysis, or anywhere that analytical problem-solving is a bonus. 

Typical roles

You can expect to apply for roles like “machine learning engineer” or “machine learning scientist”; or, more broadly, titles like “data engineer” or “data scientist”. More generally, you’ll find your ability to build models that learn from data is in demand in sectors such as finance, education, retail, defence, government research.

Female student at computer

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Modules

What you'll study

Year 1

  • Calculus I
  • Linear Algebra
  • Computational Mathematics
  • Mathematical Foundations
  • Mathematical Models
  • Statistical Theory and Methods I

There are no optional modules in Year 1

Core modules include: 

  • Applications of Mathematics and Graduate Skills
  • Calculus II
  • Machine Learning 1

Optional modules include: 

  • Real and Complex Analysis
  • Applied Machine Learning and Data Mining
  • Operational Research
  • Institution Wide Language Program
  • Algebraic Structures and Discrete Mathematics
  • Mechanics and Dynamics
  • Statistical Theory and Methods II
  • Mathematics for Finance
  • Universe: Planetary Systems, Stars and Galaxies

Core modules include: 

  • Machine Learning 2
  • Statistical Learning

Optional modules include: 

  • Undergraduate Ambassador
  • Partial Differential Equations And Their Applications
  • Nonlinear Dynamics
  • Statistics Methods In Health Research & Social Science
  • Quantitative Supply Chain Management
  • Financial Derivative Pricing
  • Introduction To General Relativity And Cosmology
  • Modern Astrophysics 1
  • Project
  • Practical Data Analytics And Mining
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Advanced Decision Modelling

After your second or third year, you can do an optional study abroad or work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Study Mathematics at the University of Portsmouth

Meet your staff, facilities and equipment

Get an introduction to mathematics at Portsmouth from Professor Daniel Thomas, Head of the School of Mathematics and Physics, and colleagues. Explore our facilities and equipment, and discover more about your prospects as a maths graduate.

Daniel Thomas: What excites me most about university education is that it is right at the interface between research and teaching. Newly acquired skills and knowledge get passed on to the next generation directly, to you. 

The University of Portsmouth is providing mathematics staff and students just with the right space in the right environment to do exactly that. 

Our research, as well as our teaching, are concentrated in this building in the Lion Gate Building. 

We will now move on to our lecture theatre where Dr. Marianna Cerasuolo will tell us more about the facilities we have in this building. 

Marianna Cerasuolo: In the first year, all of our students take compulsory modules in core subjects which are necessary to become very good mathematicians. In the second and third year, they have a wide variety of options they can choose. 

In particular, they can decide either to stay on straight mathematics, so what we call the BSc Mathematics, or to take different, more specialised paths. For example, mathematics for finance and management or mathematics with statistics. 

We have also other types of options like astrophysics or cosmology and general relativity, or they can decide to do operational research and logistics. Actually, we have a very strong research group who works on this particular subject. 

So since the first year, our students learn that mathematics in its entirety has lots of real life applications. They also learn to work together as a team, and that makes them very valuable for companies once they finish their degree with us. 

Daniel Thomas: The nice thing about our school is that the staff offices are right next to the lecture theatre and the computer lab. We have an open door policy because we want to support your learning the best we can. You can pop in our staff office any time during the day and ask our staff about the lectures or about the course material, any questions about mathematics that you may have. 

We will now move on to our computer lab where Dr. James Burridge, reader in statistical physics, will tell you about the facilities we have. 

James Burridge: In my research, I use tools of probability, physics, and machine learning to build models of language, and to understand what we can learn about people from the way they speak. My models use many different kinds of data, including detailed geographical information, large scale linguistic surveys and audio. 

Using big data to model the real world, identifying patterns and making predictions are commercially valuable skills. Some people say they are driving a fourth industrial revolution. Here at Portsmouth, we will teach you the mathematics of modelling and prediction, which can be applied to problems in biology, health care and a whole range of commercial applications. 

Using computer labs like this one, we will teach you state of the art machine learning techniques to solve real world problems. These can include recognising emotions from speech data, predicting and classifying images and modelling behaviour. 

Daniel Thomas: The Technology Learning Centre at the ground floor of Lion Gate Building is a perfect space for students to study, to learn, to meet or just to hang out. We also use the space to offer our daily tutorials, the maths cafe, where our mathematics staff are providing tutorials to our mathematics students, where you can ask any questions about mathematics. 

We look forward to welcoming you at the University of Portsmouth to discover the beauty of mathematics with us. 

Teaching

On this course, you'll be taught in:

  • Lectures, including active participation in which you'll try out the material being taught in the lecture
  • Tutorials and special exercise classes to practise your learning
  • Online teaching videos and resources
  • Independent study

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a web connection.

How you're assessed

You'll be assessed through written and practical exams, coursework and in-class tests. While most modules have an exam element, no module is wholly based on a single exam result. 

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark, and use feedback from your practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Mathematics with Machine Learning degree. You’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, practical classes and workshops for about 19 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

You'll get about 18 hours per week face-to-face contact time, plus support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your mathematics skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,900 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

 

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – G500
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.