Future Technology Centre - TEAL

Cyber Security and Forensic Computing BSc (Hons)

Join the fight against cybercrime. Investigate cyberattacks, expose flaws in security systems and become an expert in malware forensics and cryptography.

University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

I901

Accreditation:

This course is Accredited

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points from 2 or 3 A levels

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

Digital security breaches can bring down banks, hospitals and governments. But you can join the fight against cybercrime.

Investigate cyberattacks, expose flaws in security systems and stop hackers in their tracks. Use ethical hacking to secure the operating systems of global companies. Become an expert in malware forensics and cryptography in a world that relies on computing to thrive.

On this BSc (Hons) Cyber Security and Forensic Computing course, you’ll build technical and investigative skills to break down security systems, expose gaps in security and identify cyber intruders. You’ll also learn how to investigate cybercrime for the police and see a case through to court.

The University of Portsmouth is ranked 5th of the modern universities for research quality in computer science and informatics

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021

Read more about our computer science research

Course highlights

  • Benefit from our close relationship with the Hampshire Police High Tech Crime Unit through an optional internship
  • Design and develop software, hardware and networks, in fields such as digital forensics and artificial intelligence
  • Benefit from the Student Union's cyber and computing clubs and societies such as the AI and Robotics Club, IT Society and Gaming Society
  • Gain insight from guest expert lecturers from the forensic and cyber security field

Accreditation

This course is accredited by the British Computer Society (The Chartered Institute for IT), fully meeting the educational requirement for CITP and partially meeting the educational requirement for CEng.

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Entry requirements

BSc (Hons) Cyber Security and Forensic Computing degree entry requirements

Typical offers

  • UCAS points - 112-120 points from 2 or 3 A levels, or equivalent, to include a relevant subject. (calculate your UCAS points)
  • A levels - BBB-BBC, to include a relevant subject.
    Relevant subjects: Mathematics; Further Mathematics; Statistics; Computer Science; Software Systems Development; Electronics; Physics; Information Technology; Economics.
  • T-levels - Merit
    Acceptable T Level Subjects: T Level in Digital: Digital Production, Design and Development, T Level in Construction: Design, Surveying and Planning, T Level in Digital Business Services, T Level in Digital Support and Services, T Level in Science, T Level in Engineering and Manufacturing Design and Development, T Level in Maintenance, Installation and Repair for Engineering and Manufacturing, T Level in Engineering, Manufacturing, Processing and Control
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 29

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept at UCAS.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Your facilities

Cyber Security & Digital Forensics Lab

Cyber security and digital forensics labs

Equipped with everything you need to secure and analyse digital evidence. Access machines capable of running multiple operating systems and experiment with all aspects of the digital forensic process – including collection, storage, analysis and presentation of evidence.

Cyber security and digital forensics labs

Portsmouth offered me a degree course in a rapidly growing and evolving area of study, in a way that made our knowledge applicable to industry.

Matthew Swann, BSc Cyber Security and Forensic Computing Student

Careers and opportunities

The cost of cybercrime was estimated at $1 trillion in 2020 – 50% higher than in 2018. According to the UK Government, 64% of large businesses and 51% of high-income charities reported cyber security breaches or attacks in a 12 month period.

Not surprisingly, with the growing threat of cyber crime, senior cyber security analysts can expect salaries from £35,000 to £60,000 and you can earn up to £80,000 a year as a senior forensic computer analyst. And the demand is there – 100% of our students from this course who are in work 15 months after they graduate are in highly skilled work.

Graduate destinations

Our graduates have worked for companies such as:

  • Metropolitan Police
  • Lockheed Martin
  • Capgemini
  • Adatis
  • F-Secure
  • Dynamics Consultants

What jobs can you do with a cyber security and forensic computing degree?

  • digital forensic examiner
  • threat hunter
  • cyber intelligence analyst
  • cloud infrastructure consultant
  • cyber security analyst
  • data analytics consultant

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities and work experience. Towards the end of your degree and after graduation, you'll get 1-to-1 support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to find your perfect role.
Female student at computer
Futureproof your career

Alan's volunteering experience earned him a Vice-Chancellor Commendation

Cyber Security and Forensic Computing student, Alan Ross, won a commendation at the annual Vice-Chancellor’s Awards for Excellence for using his expertise to support the running of the Government's Cyber 9/12 Strategy Challenge.

Placement year opportunities

Taking an optional placement year will give you the experience you need to increase your chances of landing your perfect role after graduation.

We'll give you all the support you need to find a placement that prepares you for your career, and we'll continue to mentor you throughout your placement.

You could also choose to set up your own business, or take a voluntary placement.

Potential roles

Previous students have taken placement roles such as:

  • cyber analyst
  • cyber forensic analyst undergraduate
  • security operations analyst
  • undergraduate software developer and support analyst
  • technology industrial placement student

Potential destinations

They've completed placements at organisations including:

  • InTandem
  • Nomura
  • BAE Systems
  • IBM
  • Pfizer

I chose the University of Portsmouth because of the feel of it and how friendly the staff were. I also love how hands-on it is and how much I actually get to do!

Alex Jarvis, Forensic Computing Student

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

What you'll study

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the logical concepts underpinning the design of computer systems
  • Demonstrate the application of practical digital circuit design and optimisation techniques
  • Define the fundamental developments and functions of the CPU and OS (operating system)
  • Apply mathematical skills that support the technical aspects of computing at basic and advanced levels

What you'll do

You'll learn a brief history of computing, as you discuss its sub-disciplines and its current trends and advances.

What you'll do

You'll get an introduction to the underlying concepts of forensic investigations and of cyber security principles, giving you a strong understanding of both the theoretical and practical aspects of this subject area.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the role and function of a forensic investigator
  • Evaluate the role and function of a cyber security practitioner
  • Demonstrate skills, attributes and knowledge required by forensic investigators and cyber security practitioners

What you'll do

You'll learn about practical programming techniques using the Python and Java programming languages.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design, implement and test algorithms to solve problems using appropriate data types and control structures
  • Design, implement and test object-oriented programs based on a specification
  • Describe and analyse fundamental programming concepts and techniques

What you'll do

You'll discover the knowledge and practical abilities relevant to entry-level networking in the ICT (information and communications technology) industry. You'll also get opportunities for hands-on experience and expand your career development skills.

This module supports you in preparing for a Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate (MCSA) industry certification.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the basic principles of system administration and internetworking
  • Install and configure Linux and Windows servers and workstations to implement small business networks
  • Explain and apply the basic principles of interconnectivity and the provision of services for system administration in Linux and Windows environments

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll focus on known classes of vulnerabilities and will cover standard pen-testing techniques such as scanning, intelligence gathering, local/network enumeration, local privilege escalation, persistence and domain privilege escalation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate tools and techniques for intelligence gathering and enumeration, and for enumerating data/command injection vulnerabilities
  • Propose recommendations for securing a system

What you'll do

You’ll engage in theoretical and practical information related to digital forensics investigations including basic concepts and principals such as the ACPO guidelines and popular tools such as AccessData FTK and RegRipper to critically preserve, analyse and interpret digital evidence in an ethical manner. You’ll also work in groups on real work problems and report your findings and solutions in a clear and effective way.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate and critically reflect on the use of forensic tools and techniques as well as on the interpretation of evidence
  • Apply appropriate investigation techniques to examine and analyse forensic artefacts
Additional content

What you'll do

You'll look at the implementation of operating systems, microprocessor architectures, routing, mobility, and security protocols. To study this module, you need to take the Architectures and Operating Systems, Networks, and Programming modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate a multi-tasking and multi-user operating system
  • Demonstrate the role of concurrency and communication in modern operating systems and processors
  • Analyse the operation of advanced computer architectures and high performance processors
  • Examine the principles, limitations and applications of current computer networks
  • Apply the principles of error control, quality of service and security to networks
  • Develop and interpret simple codes in a system-level programming language

What you'll do

To study this module, you need to take a mathematics module and demonstrate your understanding of data representation (such as hexadecimal and binary.).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Synthesise a secure computer system
  • Evaluate common cryptographic techniques
  • Analyse a cryptographic system, identify vectors for attack, and determine mechanisms for closing vulnerabilities

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll look at security threats to business, the impact they can have, and at solutions to these threats. As you explore the threats from new technology, such as mobile devices and cloud computing, you'll grasp the importance of technical components such as operating systems, networks and databases to the design of secure solutions and application level security.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the main security threats in relation to business information
  • Analyse the impact of security breaches on business
  • Examine the legal, ethical and professional responsibilities in relation to developing secure systems

What you'll do

You'll be introduced to the virtualisation solutions commonly used in industry and explore the core aspects and principles of their operation. You'll also complete a full deployment of a small scale cloud solution.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise core principles and theories underlying virtualisation and cloud computing
  • Compare and contrast different virtualisation solutions with respect to a given a specification
  • Install, configure and manage an OpenNebula cloud solution

What you'll do

You’ll examine various modes of cybercrime including hacking, viruses and denial of service attacks to offences such as cyberbullying, cyberstalking, cyber-fraud and identity theft.

You’ll also look at the main organisations involved in fighting cybercrime in the UK and internationally, and on human rights-related debates regarding cyberspace such as privacy and freedom of expression/freedom of information.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Identify and apply relevant legislation and case-law to cybercrime incidents
  • Recognise and discuss important issues relating to criminal and social justice
  • Engage with and analyse major human-rights-related debates that are relevant to cybercrime and understand how these debates influence cybercrime and the relevant responses
  • Effectively research legal and case-law developments and report and analyse them using appropriate style and terminology

What you'll do

You'll also analyse and use these structures as you design efficient algorithms. To choose this unit, you need to have taken a first year programming module, and be confident in elementary mathematics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Construct and use fundamental data structures to solve problems
  • Demonstrate the practical effects of different data structures and typical algorithms
  • Review and analyse the practical effects of using different data structures in the design of algorithms

What you'll learn

The learning objectives of this module are to be confirmed.

What you'll do

You’ll develop the knowledge and practical abilities relevant to advanced networking in the information and communications technology (ICT) industry. Practical classes will equip you with important career skills such as critical analysis and team work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the principles of network operation and management
  • Install, configure and manage network servers and services in both Linux and Windows environments
  • Analyse requirements for complex network systems and determine optimal solutions and strategies for developing and managing them

What you'll do

You'll spend five to six days with students in local schools from key stage 2 to sixth form, beginning your initial teacher training (ITT) award. To study this option, you'll need to demonstrate your commitment and suitability for school work, and pass a Disclosure and Barring Service check. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the skills required to work in an unfamiliar environment
  • Explain the key aspects of teaching computing in schools, including knowledge of the National Curriculum, appropriate teaching techniques, and computing related topics
  • Devise and evaluate appropriate ways to communicate a difficult principle or concept
  • Reflect on your learning and experience during your time in school

What you'll do

You'll also cover the integration of client and server programs with API-based services, such as database access.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify industry best practices in web application design
  • Design a contemporary web application using industry best practices
  • Evaluate the design and implementation of web applications

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll be exposed to different tools and methodologies, including practical cases.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Predict the threat to common malware targets by performing malware investigations
  • Construct malware and determine suitable executable injection techniques
  • Reverse engineer malware to evaluate its likely function and ways in which to remove it
  • Review the use of appropriate techniques and tools such as disassemblers and debuggers
  • Employ network monitoring tools to identify malware and other traffic of interest to a forensic investigator

What you'll do

To study this module, you need to take a mathematics module and demonstrate your understanding of data representation (such as hexadecimal and binary.).

 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Synthesise a secure computer system
  • Evaluate common cryptographic techniques
  • Analyse a cryptographic system, identify vectors for attack, and determine mechanisms for closing vulnerabilities

What you'll do

This module will also focus on how those classes of vulnerabilities can be exploited.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate tools and techniques for identifying logical and implementation errors in software systems
  • Evaluate techniques for exploiting logical and implementation errors in software systems
  • Propose recommendations for securing software systems through the development lifecycle
Additional content
 

 

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll be part of a interdisciplinary and entrepreneurial student team that receives a unique problem from a sponsor, drawn from areas such as policy, economics, technology, national security, environment or logistics. Using a range of 'Lean Start-up' methodological tools and techniques, you'll understand the problem and propose a potential solution for your sponsor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a sophisticated and empirically-grounded understanding of challenges facing large organisations
  • Engage critically with a range of methodological tools and approaches commonly deployed to address real-world challenges
  • Understand the practical dynamics underpinning team-based approaches to addressing challenges

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Initiate and manage a large individual project appropriate to the student's current programme of studies
  • Devise a project initiation document, as well as stating the objectives, the research question(s), the methodology they intend to employ and how they plan to go about doing it
  • Identify ethical issues pertinent to their project and take necessary action(s) in order to address these issues
  • Conduct a formal literature review
  • Critically analyse primary/secondary data collected via filed work
  • Evaluate and critique your work against its objectives, research question(s) and the appropriateness of the methodologies used

What you'll do

You'll analyse relevant issues and literature, propose solutions to your problem, and investigate through lab or field based activities, case studies, surveys, documentary or database research to produce a final report.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Employ best practice methods and approaches to manage a large-scale project
  • Identify and summarise the problem to be solved and put it in context
  • Identify legal, ethical, social and professional issues relevant to your project and take necessary action(s) to address these issues
  • Conduct a formal literature search, identifying, analysing, comparing and contrasting sources and writing an evaluative review
  • Design, implement and test a substantial relevant artefact (or several smaller artefacts)
  • Critically evaluate your work against its objectives, reflecting and generalising on the learning achieved in your written report

What you'll do

You'll apply different data mining and machine learning methods to databases and investigate their use for decision support.

To study this unit, you need to take the Database module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module, you'll be able to: 

  • Model and implement a data warehouse
  • Select and apply the data mining technique suitable for the analysis task
  • Describe how data mining design and implementation methods could be used to solve live problems
  • Critically analyse and evaluate the performance of different data mining techniques

What you'll do

You’ll examine security threats to businesses and the impact they can have, solutions to these threats and changes in the variety and nature of threats due to new technologies being introduced, such as the use of mobile devices and cloud computing. You’ll be introduced to the importance that technical components such as operating systems, networks and databases have on the design of secure solutions as well as application level security.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and critically evaluate the risks and vulnerabilities faced by business organisations
  • Identify and critically evaluate a range of security solutions and their appropriate deployment in relevant contexts
  • Critically evaluate and create a disaster recovery plan for business continuity

What you'll do

This module will be taken in year three of a 4-year sandwich degree programme for a period of one academic year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • engage in a structured learning activity by undertaking study in a foreign institution
  • improve your skills of self-sufficiency, self-management and your interpersonal skills, and enhance your employability
  • develop international understanding and cross-cultural awareness
  • develop your language skills
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio project (pass/fail, pass mark of 40).

What you'll do

You'll get the opportunity to put into practice your learning from the first two years of the degree and improve your chances of securing a professional level role upon graduation. Once you successfully pass the module, you’ll be eligible to apply for either ENGTech or ICTTech registration.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate your learning, personal development and future career opportunities
  • Describe tasks undertaken and responsibilities held in the course of (self) employment
  • Differentiate your employability as graduates, as a result of the placement experience
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
  • 195 hours of placement
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word portfolio project (100% of final mark).

Additional content
 

 

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Union Jack flag patch on military uniform

Solve critical national security, defence, civic and social challenges in optional module

Work alongside other students to suggest solutions to complex security challenges facing the UK military, Ministry of Defence and other government agency end-users.

Find out more

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • laboratory work
  • project work

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • critical evaluation essays
  • written exams
  • research projects
  • mini projects
  • presentations

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops for about 13 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your mathematics skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship)
  • International (non-EU) students – £19,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Costs breakdown

Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

 

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – I901
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.