Early Childhood Studies with Psychology BA (Hons)

early childhood studies with psychology student holds papier mache owls
UCAS Code
LX53
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2022

Overview

If you want to make a difference in the lives of young people and understand what makes them tick, you can combine the study of childhood and psychology on this BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies with Psychology degree.

You’ll explore the theory and lives of children from birth to 8 years old, covering themes such as cover education, health and welfare. And you'll study psychology to build your understanding of children's individual and collective behaviour and how this affects their development.

At the end of the course you'll be set for a career in roles such as early years practitioner, play worker, youth worker, teacher and social worker.

Entry requirements​

To do this degree, you need to apply for the BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies course. This is because it's a ‘pathway’ degree.

You’ll study Early Childhood Studies in depth and add Psychology as a complementary subject in years 2 and 3. You’ll graduate with a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies with Psychology degree when you finish the course.

These are the entry requirements for the BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies course.

BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BCC
  • UCAS points – 104–120 points (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T levels – Pass (C or above in the core)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T levels – Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What you'll experience

On this degree you'll:

  • Develop a thorough understanding of the first 8 years of children's lives and develop the skills you need for a career in the early years sector
  • Examine the issues that shape the lives of young children in society and explore what future care and education could look like
  • Be taught by staff that are active in research into areas such as animal cognition, autism, forensic psychology and quality of working life
  • Use specialist psychology equipment and facilities, including an observation suite, toddler and infant laboratory, psychophysiology laboratory, psychology of applied cognition laboratory, and digital analysis and video editing suite
  • Draw from current issues, using national and international viewpoints to explore the development of children in their first experiences at home and in initial education
  • Hone the soft skills that employers value including teamwork, communication, problem solving, self-motivation and time management
  • Complement your studies with our research seminars and guest speakers where you'll grapple with issues alongside other students and lecturers
  • You can also tailor your studies to include the Early Years Initial Teacher Training (EYITT) award. This doesn't give you Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), but it does mean you can become a fully qualified teacher with specialised training for children birth to five years. Following your studies, you could go on to do a PGCE and gain QTS if you wish.
  • Run simulation activities to examine the responses of children to play and learning in the controlled environment of our practice suite.

Careers and opportunities

When you complete the course, you’ll be prepared to take on roles in education, social care and health-related areas. You could also continue your studies at postgraduate level.

What can you do with a Early Childhood Studies degree?

Previous students have gone on to work in:

  • teaching
  • healthcare
  • social welfare
  • the police force
  • early years teaching and training
  • nursery practice
  • play work
  • family support services
  • early years management
  • healthcare and health promotion
  • social work
  • the voluntary sector
  • special educational and disability support

What jobs can you do with a Early Childhood Studies degree?

Specific roles that our graduates have gone on to include:

  • training assessor
  • teacher
  • employability coordinator
  • careers advisor
  • schools liaison officer

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course. We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies and build your links within the industry.

We'll also be available to help, advise and support you for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Placement year

After your second year of study, you can do a paid placement year, working within local schools and organisations. This lets you put your knowledge and skills to work while developing your links with employers.

You’ll get mentoring and support throughout your placement, to ensure you’re getting the most out of the year.

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies with Psychology degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

To graduate with a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies with Psychology degree, you'll choose the Psychology options from the BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies modules over your studies. These are the BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies modules:

Modules

Year 1
Year 2
Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll design and complete a small group research project, which has clear and narrow scope, and is based on collaboration. You'll use one of the research approaches you've been introduced to gather data and given the opportunity to apply one of the research lenses you've been introduced to in your assessments.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a viable group research project
  • Evaluate different research methods and paradigms
  • Reflect on the strengths and weaknesses of different research methods and approaches to research
  • Assess a range of qualitative research methods for use in research with children and young people in the social sciences
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do
You’ll explore theories related to the physical, psychosocial, and cognitive development of children. In this module, you’ll learn about children's social, emotional and cognitive development in relation to environmental influences (e.g. the role of the family and culture) and genetics (e.g. biological determinants and factors).
What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe key elements of how children and adolescents develop from a theoretical perspective
  • Explain how different stages of the growth and development processes are influenced by each other
  • Recognise how external and internal influences (nature, nurture) impact and contribute to the development of self concept in an individual
  • Discuss examples of social, emotional and cognitive development in children
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final essay)
  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final essay)

What you'll do

In this module, you’ll consider these requirements and the conditions that will ensure young children flourish in settings and at home. You’ll explore the implications of policy, local initiatives and current issues related to children's health and well being while considering the inequalities and challenges to the welfare of families with young children. You'll also review emerging tensions in the wake of the Covid-19 pandemic and other contemporary issues relating to the health and wellbeing of young children and families.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Gain knowledge and understanding of key issues related to the health and well being of young children 
  • Analyse the ways health impacts on the lives of young children and families 
  • Describe and effectively communicate the inequalities children and families may encounter in enabling the health and wellbeing of young children 
  • Meet knowledge components of Early Childhood Graduate Practitioner Competencies
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll learn about the core childhood pioneers and comparative curricula as well as focusing on the requirements of the Early Years Foundation Stage (EYFS). You’ll examine how partnerships between home and setting can promote successful outcomes for children and explore how practitioners plan and provide for early learning experiences through the EYFS and into KS1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe perspectives of early childhood education
  • Examine the principles and practices of working in partnership with carers as children's first educators
  • Identify an effective environment for children’s learning and development in the curriculum, ensuring account is taken of stage of development, individual needs and circumstances of children
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop a critical and reflective knowledge and understanding of childhood while questioning its principles, practices and boundaries. You'll critically engage with relevant topics and debates while developing key academic skills. This module will give you foundational learning of the topic, and encourage you to engage in ongoing personal, academic and professional development and to reflect on this process.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appreciate what different disciplines offer for understanding childhoods
  • Discuss issues pertaining to inclusivity
  • Engage in reflection about the topics under discussion
  • Identify key concepts in relation to the study of childhood
  • Engage in reflection on continuing personal, professional, and academic, development
Teaching activities
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 22 hours of seminars
  • 11 hours of tutorials
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 339 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll discuss how the concepts of 'local' and 'global' are constructed, considering culture, identity and citizenship. You’ll be able to debate whether multimedia technologies provide renewed opportunities to play or whether they enable the creation of transnational and convergent cultural practices.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess the use and validity of different theoretical perspectives in understanding and interpreting specific perspectives on children and young people
  • Examine outcomes of processes of globalisation for children and young people by analysing specific cases
  • Apply knowledge and understanding of theories of globalisation to relevant cases in the UK and abroad to appraise outcomes for children and young people
  • Construct and present reasoned analyses of aspects of modern life and processes of globalisation
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.""

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine how children's development influences the types of play children engage in between birth and 12 years of age. You'll focus on play and its role in development and learning to get an understanding of what makes an effective play environment, the role of risk in play and how adults working with children can support and engage with play experiences.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss and reflect upon a range of perspectives related to play for children aged from birth to 12 years of age
  • Compare and contrast types and forms of children's play
  • Explore meanings of play in social and educational contexts
  • Evaluate experiences that enrich the play and learning of children
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour seminars
  • 7 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll gain employability and professional skills needed for the sector while developing your understanding of the implications of working with other professionals. The number of hours of placement will be a minimum of 90 but may vary to meet external requirements of the sector.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate skills required for providing learning experiences, environments and opportunities appropriate to the age, stage and needs of individuals and groups
  • Examine theoretical concepts around professional practice and how they are applied in the workplace
  • Utilise the concepts of reflection to articulate personal and professional development goals
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 6 x 1-hour lectures
  • 7 x 1-hour seminars
  • 90 hours of placement
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 183 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 60-hour set exercise (pass/fail)
  • a 3,000-word portfolio project (100% of final mark) – includes a 500-word practical skills assessment to cover safeguarding

What you'll do

The research process must always consider the interests of children in terms of ethical conduct, confidentiality, child protection and consent. This module develops the skills you need to complete a project including effective literature sourcing, validity, reliability, ethical considerations, research methods and the development of effective research tools in the field of child development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess quantitative and qualitative research methodologies and be able to understand which of these to deploy in a research study
  • Reflect on the main issues around debates of the strengths and limitations of research with children and young people
  • Analyse research with children and young people
  • Identify and develop a topic appropriate for in-depth study and consider issues related to ethical and data protection issues
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 400-word coursework project (10% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll focus on texts through various theories, applying literary criticism to children’s texts and explore adults' writing about children’s literature, applying theoretical concepts to examples in children’s books. You'll also explore the affective power of language and illustration, and potential messages for the child, by exploring children's texts through drawing, role play and reflection.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the power of language and illustration in children's stories and picture books
  • Identify and examine the social and moral issues raised in different types of texts
  • Compare and contrast the literature published for children and young people
  • Interpret selected literature through a variety of media
  • Creatively apply a variety of theoretical frames to analyse children's literature
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 hours of guided independent study
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll gain an understanding of how children develop moral reasoning, and how they connect with and process the world around them. As the central focus, this understanding will form the basis to which you’ll explore issues of personality, identity, self-esteem, conformity, rebellion, and resilience in relation to children’s development from infancy through to adolescence.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use a social psychology perspective to explore the nuances of children's social development
  • Take responsibility for your own learning with minimum direction, in independent and group learning
  • Apply a detailed knowledge of formative social influences in children's lives
  • Critically analyse the forces and dilemmas which influence how children relate to the world around them
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the way these influences impact on working with children and young people as well as self-reflecting on your own learning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the key features of various learning theories/models
  • Examine how external influences impact and contribute to the development of learning in individuals
  • Consider how the theories of learning could be applied in an educational context
  • Demonstrate insight into your own approaches to learning
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine how children are using current technologies for their own interests as well as the application of technology within curriculum frameworks.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine the range of technology used by children and young people
  • Evaluate how information and communications technology (ICT) is used to support children's learning and development taking into account any barriers and challenges there may be to its use
  • Analyse society's attitudes towards children and young people and technology
  • Engage with technology used by children and young people
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 8 hours of guided independent study
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute coursework project (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine how the concepts of gender and race have been used to construct specific identities. As we live in a context of increased diversification, you’ll reflect on the role played by gender and race identities in the increasingly globalised context of educational institutions.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the ways in which theories of gender and race intersect with other social identities such as class, age, and religion
  • Critically assess the use of different theoretical perspectives in understanding and interpreting specific discourses related to children and young people in education
  • Compare and contrast different positions in relation to children and young people’s lives and identities
  • Identify and analyse gender and race inequalities that exist in today’s educational institutions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Demonstrate detailed knowledge on four subdomains within psychology: biological psychology, cognitive psychology, individual differences, and developmental psychology
  • Evaluate psychology’s use and understanding of the main biological, cognitive and developmental processes, as well as individual differences
  • Manage information and select appropriate psychological data from a range of academic sources
  • Recognise, recall and discuss psychological constructs, subject specific terminology and empirical applications
  • Gain insight into suitable career opportunities, using psychological tools like psychometric tests and personality questionnaires, and make plans of how to attain them.
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word  Employability Portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about key authors and theoretical concepts and examine school practices, what students learn, and how schools fit into wider society. You'll consider how schooling challenges and supports existing systems of state governance and economic inequality, and examine sociological debates such as those that understand education as a form of social control.

You'll also consider the roles of class, gender, race, religion, disability and additional needs, and relationships with the sociology of work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan to combine and evaluate academic sources and relevant evidence
  • Critically review key theoretical and empirical debates about the sociology of education
  • Examine ideas about the sociology of education from relevant sources
  • Assess the relationship between education and other facets of contemporary society
  • Evaluate the current state of knowledge of education from a sociological perspective
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in a study relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance
  • Critically reflect on the formal learning experience and student ambassadorial role for the University, and consider the relevance of this learning to future study and/or employability and personal development
  • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your undergraduate course within the global context
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 595 hours abroad
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll discover theories and methods you can use to build on your existing knowledge. You'll consider generational shifts and experiences of young people while evaluating different frameworks and approaches, and considering their application to everyday lived experiences. Underpinning the module is an awareness of inclusivity, diversity, citizenship and social justice.

You'll also have the opportunity to pursue your own interests through researching and presenting on a specialist topic of your choice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically engage with key theories and concepts in the field of personal life
  • Evaluate methodological approaches to researching Personal Life
  • Explore in detail an identified area of interest
  • Demonstrate learning through oral and written communication
  • Critically reflect on the learning undertaken
Teaching activities
  • 11 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Communicate clearly and effectively about social problems and their consequences.
  • Evaluate strategies for addressing forms of inequality and/or sustainability and obstacles to their implementation.
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player able to support others.

Explore this module

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll analyse aspects of working with professionals and families, the curriculum requirements, and the significance of the working environment. Psychological theories explored in this module will build on knowledge you developed in your first and second years.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate and critically analyse the method and practice of storying in the role of professionals and families and evaluate the contribution of their relationship to the learning and development of children
  • Critically evaluate the role of the environment in the promotion of young children's learning and development
  • Analyse factors that contribute to the development and well-being of a child under 3-years-old
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Develop a critical and well informed approach to how best to lead, manage and deliver equitable services for children and families in their work place
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the wider philosophical and theoretical principles that underpin leading and managing practice in their field
  • Evaluate the notion of professionalism when working with children and their families and use critical reflection to explore professional identity
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of how to apply leadership and management theory to real world situations to provide equitable and outstanding services for children and families

Explore this module

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll examine various strategies designed to meet the needs of children and young people showing challenging behaviour, and the impact of these strategies.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the complexities of challenging behaviour in children and young people
  • Critically assess possible causes of challenging behaviour
  • Critically review strategies and processes used for managing behaviour across the 0-19 age range
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine how severe learning needs are identified, the role of professional agencies, and the support of children with severe learning difficulties and their families.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on the environmental and physiological aspects of severe learning difficulties
  • Analyse educational barriers faced by children and young people with severe learning needs
  • Examine the support available to children and young people with severe learning difficulties
  • Critically appraise the role of families and carers in supporting children and young people with severe learning needs
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll consider folk and fairy tales from around the world, explore theoretical approaches to analyse them, and look at the role of the child reading these fantastical stories. You'll study experiential aspects of fairy tale, myth and folktale, and examine children's psycho-social development through these narratives.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss tellings and retellings of fairy tales and folktales from around the world
  • Engage with different theoretical approaches to analysing fairy tales
  • Apply multiple theoretical approaches to reading and deconstructing fairy tales and folktales
  • Position folk and fairy tales as cultural artefacts with histories in today's world
  • Know how to use fairytales in settings with children, and how to apply different academic approaches to fairytales
  • Evaluate the use of fairy tales in experiential, research-oriented and practice contexts
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll critically examine professional perspectives, interventions and current policy such as the Troubled Families Programme and Think Family. You’ll explore psychological and sociological perspectives that will underpin your learning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically consider the lived experience of families in need
  • Analyse relevant theory in relation to family experience
  • Critically apply knowledge of the context of policy and practice so as to extend understanding of the issues families face, and the social context they experience
  • Demonstrate confidence in considering complex problems within society
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute group presentation (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll reflect on your attitudes and experiences in the outdoors and how these experiences shape our approaches to teaching methods in education. Learn how to carry out effective risk-benefit analyses and how to frame your approach to risk as enabling children, young people, and adults.

The module also encourages healthy debate about the ecological challenges facing us and how we might shape educational practice and policy as a step to action.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss knowledge of relevant theories, philosophies and concepts about outdoor education
  • Develop a critical awareness of the role of risk in decision making and learning
  • Critically apply theories of adventure learning
  • Critically reflect on the child’s and the practitioner’s experience of outdoor education
Teaching activities
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 22 hours of seminars including fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word practical exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

They may appear isolated, anxious and fearful or they may seem unhappy or disturbed. You’ll examine the characteristics of these problems, as well as some of the explanations that have been offered about how these problems arise.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine different concepts and models in relation to mental health issues in children
  • Reflect on the different sources and risk factors (pathological, social) that play a role in the diagnosis of mental health issues, and critically analyse how they interact
  • Critically analyse abnormal and disturbing behaviour as context-embedded and normatively defined problems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll focus on childhood and child development. You'll also look at ethics in practice with children and young people, and explore core concepts within health and education based approaches which encompass psychological theory.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically review specific child and education based practice approaches based in psychological theory
  • Articulate a critical evaluation of the role of ethical practice when working with children, young people and families
  • Evaluate psychological theory alongside the lived experience of children, young people and families
  • Examine professional approaches in the context of psychological and educational discourse
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2 hour workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework project (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll draw on the principles of community psychology to explore methods of prevention, intervention and evaluation at a community level. You'll work with real-life case studies of community projects in the voluntary and statutory sectors, underscoring the challenges of translating psychological concepts such as social influence into everyday hands-on practice.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Identify community psychology's scope of action within the social sciences
  • Evaluate a range of conceptual and practical tools in community psychology
  • Apply the components of psychological intervention at the community level through a proposal for a client
  • Assess the complexities of planning, executing and evaluating research and interventions at the community level
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 173 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 750-word draft project proposal (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word full project proposal (80% of final mark)

 

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

Coming into care itself is symptomatic of unmet needs, hostile or inadequate treatment or abuse. In this module, you’ll explore some of the core issues around working with children in the care system and examine the conditions that are most successful for meeting their needs.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically review the rationale and theory for current care system policies and practice on children and families
  • Evaluate the theories related to issues of trauma and resilience developed by children in vulnerable circumstances
  • Critically explore data related to looking after children and how it informs policy and practice
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 16.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Design a viable Major Project proposal.
  • Make use of a range of current research, advanced scholarship, or professional expertise in the relevant field.
  • Deploy established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry within an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the professional activity.
  • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) in order to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions to the problems posed in the professional activity.
  • Manage and reflect upon own learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to either the academic or workplace community.
  • Critically evaluate the impact of the project.

Explore this module

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Debate how disadvantage in social, health, learning and economic contexts intersect in the lives of children and families.
  • Explore the ways in which professionals talk with children, parents, and colleagues about Safeguarding issues.
  • Identify and critically analyse the legal perspectives in working with families where children, young people or young adults might be at risk.
  • Critically engage with approaches to identifying, managing and responding to risk in Universal Safeguarding.

Explore this module

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • group and individual projects and presentations
  • tests
  • written examinations
  • practical reports
  • self-led research project
  • a dissertation or work based project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • group-based activities
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • individual and group presentations
  • poster presentations
  • project work
  • lectures
  • practical research and experiments

    You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

    For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

    How you'll spend your time

    One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

    We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

    We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Early Childhood Studies pathway. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 10 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

    Term dates

    The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

    See term dates

    Supporting your learning

    The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

    Personal tutor

    Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

    As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

    Learning development tutors

    You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

    They can help with:

    • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
    • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
    • Understanding and using assignment feedback
    • Managing your time and workload
    • Revision and exam techniques

    Academic skills support

    As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

    ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

    • academic writing
    • note taking
    • time management
    • critical thinking
    • presentation skills
    • referencing
    • working in groups
    • revision, memory and exam techniques

    If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

    Library support

    Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

    The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

    ​Course costs and funding

    Tuition fees (2022 start)

    • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
    • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
    • International students – £16,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

    You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

    Funding your studies

    Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

    Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

    Additional course costs

    These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

    Additional costs

    Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

    You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

    You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

    We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

    If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

    You’ll need to cover additional costs, such as travel costs, if you take an optional placement or placement abroad.

    These costs will vary depending on the location and duration of the placement, and can range from £50–£1000.

    If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

    • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
    • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
    • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

    Apply

    You need to choose BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies when you apply for this course, because this is a ‘pathway’ course. This is where you study Early Childhood Studies in depth and add Psychology as a complementary subject in years 2 and 3. You’ll then graduate with a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies with Psychology degree when you complete the course.

    If you change your mind after you apply, you can choose not to study Psychology in years 2 and 3. You’ll then graduate with a BA (Hons) Early Childhood Studies degree when you complete the course.

    How to apply

    To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

    • the UCAS course code – LX53
    • our institution code – P80

    If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

    You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

    • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
    • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
    • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

    If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

    To start this course in 2023, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

    • the UCAS course code – LX53
    • our institution code – P80

    If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

    You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

    • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
    • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
    • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

    If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

    How to apply from outside the UK

    See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

    To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

    If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

    Admissions terms and conditions

    When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.