Language student using facilities
UCAS Code
R902
Mode of Study
Full-time with language year abroad
Duration
4 years full-time with language year abroad
Start Date
September 2022, September 2023

Apply through Clearing

To start this course in 2022 complete this short application form, call us on +44 (0)23 9284 8074 or go to our Clearing section to chat with us online.

Our Clearing hotline is open from 9.00am to 5.00pm Monday to Thursday, and 9.00am to 4.00pm on Fridays.

Overview

On this BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree course, you'll study one language in-depth, immersing yourself in the culture, history and identity of the communities that speak it. In an increasingly global world, equip yourself with the ability to connect with millions of people in their native language.

You'll have the choice to work towards fluency in one of the following languages:

  • French – spoken by 267 million people worldwide
  • German – spoken by 135 million people worldwide
  • Spanish – spoken by 543 million people worldwide
  • Mandarin Chinese – spoken by 1,120 million people worldwide

Boost your language and cultural studies with a year abroad on a study or work placement, in a country or region that speaks your chosen language. Previous students have experienced life in Germany, Spain, China, Taiwan, Latin America and Senegal.

Wherever you choose to go, this course and the year abroad will transform your passion for language into practical multilingual skills you can use to build your career in any field – from teaching to international management and finance, or media and marketing.

Course highlights 

  • Take a work or study abroad placement in year 3, to fully absorb the history and culture of another country and develop the skills and experience you need to build a career across borders
  • Put your language skills into practice in simulations, scenario exercises, television broadcasts and debates, so you’re ready to thrive in the wide world of work
  • Choose to focus on the aspects of other countries that fascinate you – from their history and politics, through to economics and business
  • Choose to mix and match optional modules, or tailor your course by selecting modules specifically within one of four specialisms:
  • Teaching and education
  • Translation and interpreting
  • Culture and linguistics
  • Business and industry

Options to customise your degree

If you're interested in a career in teaching, you can choose to enhance your degree with additional, widely recognised qualifications.

You can combine your language studies with teacher training and school teaching placements by taking the Initial Teacher Training (ITT) pathway.

If successful, you'll save an extra year of study, get a £9,000 bursary in your final year of study and get Qualified Teacher Status for teaching jobs in England and Wales.

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

95% Graduates in work or further study (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey conducted in 2019)

Entry requirements​

BA (Hons) Modern Languages entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–120 points (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T levels – Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 26

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T levels – Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 26

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Alternative language courses

Explore all our language undergraduate courses, so you can compare your options and apply for the best course for you.

  
  BA (Hons) Modern Languages BA (Hons) Applied Languages BA (Hons) Language Studies
Languages you'll study 1 (at either advanced or beginner level) 2 (both at advanced level, or 1 at advanced and 1 as a beginner) 1 or 2 (both at advanced level, or 1 at advanced and 1 as a beginner)
Duration 4 years 4 years 3 years
Year abroad  
Language A Level required    
Find out more   Go to course page Go to course page

Facilities and specialist equipment

Facilities for Applied and Modern Languages courses

Develop the skills needed as an interpreter or translator in our Conference Interpreter Suite – equipped with the same technology used in the European Parliament.

Learn more

Carmen, Senior Lecturer in Interpreting and Spanish

Interpreting is a module that we offer in all of our courses at the University of Portsmouth.

As part of this modules tudents get to take their language skills up to the next level.

The interpreting suite actually offers an outstanding opportunity for our students to actually put their interpreting skills into practice in a very real context.

Toby, Bethan and Matias

Qualities a student would need to succeed in this topic: perseverance, communication, preparation, teamwork and passion about interpreting and the interpretation world.

What I love about interpreting is how much it’s challenging my language skills. I want to be able to facilitate people to integrate into a culture, to make friends, to be able to work, to be able to socialise.

It’s a really safe introduction to interpreting.

This module really pushes me to actually use my Spanish very spontaneously. It encourages the learning of new vocabulary and just to think a little bit outside. You have to think on your feet. It forces you to become good, it keeps you on top!

The interpreting module was one of the main reasons why I came to Portsmouth. I think it really defines well the concept of communication.

You’ll be pushed so much, you’ll learn so much and at the end of the day you’ll have fun! Just trust your command of the language and roll with it!

Students talking in language labs room at computers

Digital Language Laboratories

Perfect your listening and comprehension skills in a rich, multi-media language learning environment. Find out how to integrate and manipulate video, sound, text and internet sources in different languages.

Explore the laboratories

Careers and opportunities

As early as 2014, UK Trade and Investment reported that the UK's lack of language skills was leading to a 3.5% loss in national income through trade. This highlights the need UK companies have for bilingual and multilingual employees.

Fast forward to a post-pandemic 2021, the opportunity to work remotely from anywhere in the world has dramatically increased and globalization of trade continues to grow (according to the DHL Global Connectedness Index). The professional language skills you develop on this course could set you apart in a global job market, whether you plan to work in the UK after graduation or pursue a career abroad.

 

"Both within and beyond Europe, we will need to reach out beyond English, not only to maintain and improve our economic position but to build trust, deepen international influence and cultural relationships, and to keep our country safe."

British Council

Languages for the Future (2017)

What jobs can you do with a modern languages degree?

Roles you could go onto include:

  • bilingual consultant
  • multilingual project coordinator translator
  • translator/interpreter
  • diplomat
  • journalist
  • tourist guide
  • market analyst

What areas can you work in with a modern languages degree?

This degree broadens your options so you can pursue almost any career. Learning a second language is useful in all sectors, including:

  • marketing
  • journalism and the media
  • international management
  • translation and interpreting
  • teaching
  • tourism
  • finance

You could also continue your studies at postgraduate level with a Master's in a subject such as Translation Studies or Applied Linguistics and TESOL.

My degree has given me the confidence to travel and work abroad. I am now in Beijing to complete a MA in European and Asian Affairs.

Jan Chodorowski, BA Hons Modern Languages student

Year abroad

After your second year, you'll do a work or study abroad placement based in one or more countries where your chosen language is spoken. The experience abroad will help you build linguistic and cultural fluency that will help you stand out to employers when you graduate.

We'll give you all the support you need before your year abroad to find a work or study abroad placement fits your aspirations. You can take advantage of our links with universities and employers worldwide, including Germany, Spain, China, Taiwan, Latin America and Senegal.

You'll continue to get mentoring and support from us throughout your year abroad, to help you get the most out of your experience.

I had the most fantastic experience on this course. I went to study abroad... which completed my course perfectly and initiated the path into my career. It was the most perfect opportunity.

Lauren Cooper , BA Hons Combined Modern Languages student

Studying abroad on the BA (Hons) Modern Languages degree course

Course leader, Paul Joyce, talk about the three different ways you can choose to spend you year abroad: doing a work placement, being a teaching assistant in a foreign country or studying at a university in a different country.

Our students always say to us that the course highlights are the year abroad and the year abroad is the third year in your degree.

There are also three different ways in which you can spend your year abroad. You can find a work placement in marketing, in translating, doing subtitling. The second opportunity you have is being a teaching assistant, an English Language Teaching Assistant in a foreign country.

And the third option is to study abroad at a partner university doing language courses but again learning about the culture and society from the perspective of an Italian university, a Chinese university, German, Spanish, French etc.

One of the things that excites us about the course is interpreting rumours and we have a state of the art interpreting suite that enables us to train our final year students.

We teach you how to interpret subtly and fairly and to give both sides of the argument and enable both sides to understand each other. And students at the end of this have a real sense of achievement because they can see the practical benefits of what it is that they are doing and interpreters are also highly in demand in the modern business world.

There are several reasons to come to Portsmouth to do a languages degree. One is the fact that Portsmouth as a city is a place where there is always something happening, particularly during the summer when we have a number of festivals, there are a number of circuses, there are things going on at Southsea common all the time. We have a beach and your friends will always want to visit you.

The other reason why I think the University of Portsmouth is a great place to study is that alongside all the academic support that we give you there are a whole load of support networks that we can give you in terms of career development in terms of writing skills in terms of communication skills.

You will get a personal tutor from your first year onwards with whom you can talk about absolutely anything. Lecturers and tutors at the University of Portsmouth are always accessible and this means that when our students graduate we keep in contact with them. They come back to visit us and we learn about how they are using their languages in practice and we can shape our degree courses in order to include the feedback that they give us about how they found their degree useful.

What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Year 1
Year 2
Year 3
Year 4

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll examine language change, regional and social variations, and language and gender as well as some of the issues involved in forensic linguistics. You’ll explore the relationship between language and the mind, considering it through an examination of how first and second languages are acquired and by looking at the ways language is processed and remembered.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify various functions of language and the different uses of language for different purposes
  • Reflect on and describe relationships between the individual, groups, society and language
  • Identify linguistic variation in relation to factors such as geographical region, social class, ethnicity, gender and nation
  • Describe aspects of the relationship between language and mind/thought
  • Explain how first and second languages are acquired, produced and comprehended
  • Collect relevant information from external sources and present your findings on the relevance of aspects of linguistics in a wider context
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark) – computerised

What you'll do

You'll critically engage with how categories such as ethnicity, linguistic group or shared values can be selectively used, and in some cases created, to generate a 'national identity' for political, social and/or economic expediency. You'll also look at evidence that the nation-state is in decline, the growing role of international and supranational organisations, and the reassertion of 'regional' identities.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a familiarity with key theories of nationalism
  • Describe the factors that have played a role in nation-building
  • Familiarise yourself with a range of French (and Francophone), German, Spanish (and Latin American) and European illustrative examples
  • Locate case studies drawn from European contexts in theories of nationalism and nation-building
  • Explain the key impacts of globalisation on the nation-state
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour lecture
  • 15 x 2-hour seminars
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll carry out a small-scale investigation into aspects of contemporary spoken language and work collaboratively to carry out research and present your findings in an oral presentation. In addition to writing an individual report, you’ll critically reflect on the process of carrying out research and how the skills you gained could be used in a professional context.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess your own learning needs and develop strategies for addressing weaknesses in learning
  • Read and organise points to form a coherent and cohesive argument on a discipline-related topic
  • Collect and analyse short extracts of authentic spoken data
  • Report collaboratively on the findings of your research project in a group presentation
  • Critically reflect on the process of carrying out research, working collaboratively and the role of research in potential careers
  • Produce a written report of the findings including potential modifications as well as reference to existing research
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 17 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word portfolio project (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

This module maps to the A1 and A2 levels of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute in-class test (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to the A1 and A2 levels of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour online seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to B1 level of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level in French language, or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, obtain information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for speaking/listening)
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for grammar)
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (for reading/writing)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module is delivered to you through seminars based on assigned written and audio texts, workshops and directed/open-ended activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand information about a variety of familiar (and some unfamiliar) topics from audio sources
  • Apply formal and informal registers in simple conversational exchanges, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Extract information about daily activities from sources that include traditional and electronic formats
  • Produce written information that describes and comments upon present, past and future events, with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Effectively use a variety of resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3 hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework project (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

The module is delivered to you via seminars based on assigned written and audio texts, workshops and directed/open-ended activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Extract information about daily activities from sources that include traditional and electronic formats
  • Produce written information that describes and comments upon present, past and future events, with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Effectively use a variety of resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.33 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills such as being able to work both independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language, and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as being able to work independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentations skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills, as well as your ability to work both independently and collaboratively.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate simply with formal and informal registers, using the target language (TL) with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information that describes and comments on events with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence.
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3 hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information about daily activities from traditional and electronic sources
  • Produce written information exchanges with an appropriate degree of grammatical accuracy and cultural competence, including simple translation tasks and summaries
  • Engage in basic conversation and mediation activities, with an appropriate degree of accuracy and cultural competence
  • Use various resources, and begin to deploy proactive, independent and collaborative learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need an A level or equivalent.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including some specialist texts
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 6-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Identify and describe some language teaching strategies and approaches and provide a basic rationale for their uses
  • Identify the main classifications of grammatical and lexical description, and their functions, as applied to English
  • Reflect upon their experience of learning of an unknown foreign language and make contrasts and comparisons between the unknown foreign language and English

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll develop the core academic skills needed to successfully undertake this degree, then carry out a small-scale investigation into aspects of contemporary spoken language. You'll work collaboratively to carry out the research and present your findings through an oral presentation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess your own learning needs and develop strategies for addressing weaknesses in learning
  • Read critically and organise points to form a coherent and cohesive argument on a discipline-related topic
  • Collect and analyse short extracts of authentic spoken data
  • Report collaboratively on the findings of the research project through a group presentation
  • Reflect on the process of carrying out research, working collaboratively and the role of research in potential careers
  • Produce a written report of the findings including potential modifications as well as reference to existing research
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 17 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • TBC

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll attend two group lectures in October and November to get generic information about your year abroad and to help you choose the type of placement you'd prefer.In December you'll go to a language-specific lecture for information on specific destinations you can choose, and in April/May you'll get more specific information about assessments, formalities and risk assessment to fully prepare you for your year abroad.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the options available for your third year abroad
  • Make an informed choice on your year abroad options
  • Understand all year abroad requirements in terms of formalities and assessment
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 1 x 1-hour lectures (an additional language-specific lecture for students studying one language)
  • 2 x 1-hour lectures (2 additional language-specific lectures for students studying 2 languages)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll explore institutions that regulate national and international business and economic relations and apply tools for the analysis on business environments. You'll also study the strategies that countries and businesses can adopt to remain competitive in an increasingly global environment and discuss issues around the responsibility of businesses in their operations and practices.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore the role of national, regional and international institutions in regulating global economic relations
  • Examine and analyse a number of factors that impact on global business, such as privatisation, liberalisation and deregulation, corporate governance or labour market flexibility
  • Apply selected theories of marketing to analyse specific markets
  • Identify and discuss how business responds to these issues through company case studies from a national, regional and/or global perspective
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine how they interact with each other and the impact that a successful economy has on traditional Asian values.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this unit successfully, you'll be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

  • The potential, legitimacy and formation of East Asia as a sub-region in the global economy
  • China’s economic reforms and its role in the regional and global economy
  • The impact of China’s growth domestically and internationally
  • The concept of 'developmental state' and its varying applications in East Asian economies
  • Individual economies and the dynamics of their regional configuration
  • The major challenges economies in East Asia face
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 2 x 1-hour coursework tutorials

You'll also have continuous online access to supporting materials, and get regular feedback from teaching staff.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the unit.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a poster (40% of final mark)
  • an essay (60% of final mark)

You'll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before your final assessments.

You'll reflect on 15 years of populist movements, and examine their moderate or radical contestation with liberal democracy in the name of the people. You'll focus on the organisation of populist movements, their leaders, strategies and ideas, and consider how democracies should repond to their national and transnational challenges.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the various key academic debates in this field
  • compare and contrast Western populist organisations, their ideas, and the responses they elicit from governments
  • Apply central concepts involved both in the comparative method and theoretical frameworks to analyse and evaluate case studies
  • Evaluate the various ways in which populism may be interpreted, including the extent to which populism represents a danger for democracy, or a hope for its renewal
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the period of military rule in the region from the 1960s to 1990. You'll consider the reasons for the emergence of these regimes (both internal and external factors), the nature of these regimes and the reasons for them coming to an end. You'll also explore transitions to democracy.

You'll analyse how nations deal with the aftermath of military rule, the particularities of democracy in Latin America, some of the challenges facing the region and examples of countries whose path towards democracy is somewhat uncertain.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the nature of military regimes and the aftermath of military rule
  • Critically evaluate transitions to democracy in Latin America
  • Account for the different experiences of democratisation across Latin America
  • Evaluate the roles played by political actors in processes of political change
  • Apply your knowledge of processes and political actors in a realistic situation
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of lectures
  • 8 hours of seminars
  • 1 hour of tutorial
  • 3 hours of practical classes and workshop
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word writing assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at a regional overview, a case study of four countries and theme-based regional comparisons while getting an introduction to comparative and transnational perspectives. You'll learn to appreciate the regional dynamics in historical legacy and current political, socioeconomic and cultural development.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the impact of modernisation and development on the relationship between state and society
  • Comment on how gender is embedded in practices of employment, content of entertainment, and key sociopolitical institutions in East Asian states
  • Compare the concepts of race and ethnicity in the contexts of racism, nationalism and multiculturalism in East Asian states
  • Acquire country-specific knowledge and a dynamic regional perspective built on cultural heritage, colonial legacy, geopolitical structure and economic interaction
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore why and how Europeans colonised Africa, the reactions of African peoples who were colonised, and challenges to colonial rule within empires and in the international arena. You'll then move on to examining British and French relations with Africa in the post-colonial era, dealing with the unfinished process of decolonisation and the legacies of colonialism in Britain, France and Africa today.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Contextualise the European colonisation of Africa
  • Engage critically with justifications for colonial rule.
  • Engage with contemporary debates regarding colonialism, decolonisation and its legacies in Europe and Africa
  • Critically analyse primary and secondary sources
  • Present a reasoned argument in written form, using appropriate terminology
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour workshops
Independent study time

You will be expected to undertake 164 hours of independent study for this module. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment
  • a 1,000-word annotated bibliography with recorded 5 minute pitch of a primary source (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (50% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Communicate clearly and effectively about social problems and their consequences.
  • Evaluate strategies for addressing forms of inequality and/or sustainability and obstacles to their implementation.
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player able to support others.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll look at the concept that France acts as if it has a 'right' to a global presence, questioning where those assumptions come from and to what end.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the significance of France in contemporary international relations
  • Critically discuss the characteristics of French foreign and defence policy since 1958
  • Critically evaluate contested notions of French power
  • Use appropriate academic conventions and subject specific terminology to present a clear discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • To synthesise key features of the French Republican system in the 20th century, and some of the ways in which it is similar and different to other "Western Democracies"
  • To analyse the changes and continuities entailed by France's shift from empire to nation-state.
  • To effectively apply different categories of analysis - including sex, "race" and class - to understand how citizenship was differentially applied and experienced.
  • To develop an informed evaluation of where power lies in modern and contemporary France.
  • To evaluate the place of the state in modern and contemporary French society and the economy.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the French Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and French Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 6-minute set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • 1 x 500-word set exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do 

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the French General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the French General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (focusing on listening and speaking skills)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the German Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and German Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 6-minute set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • 1 x 500-word set exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also take part in presentations and group work covering the four skills. To choose this module, you need to take the German General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic convention and cultural value in target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment
  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the German General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how the American empire penetrated the politics, culture and economy of Germany. You'll also explore if Germany, the country that caused two world wars and was divided into two states during the cold war, has become more American during this tumultuous century.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess and describe the forces, processes and themes associated with the Americanisation of Germany in the twentieth century
  • Evaluate the historical literature and selected primary sources about Americanisation and American influence on Germany
  • Apply different tools associated with Americanisation and cultural transfer to case studies
  • Communicate ideas effectively
  • Use appropriate academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars 
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll work as part of an international team, communicating your findings in writing and through a web page.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess key theories in intercultural communication research
  • Collect data/information and analyse it from an intercultural perspective
  • Research a certain aspect of culture and communication 
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework report (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework assignment (40% of final mark) – group website project
  • a 1,500-word written coursework assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

To choose this module, you need to take a General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Familiarise yourself with a range of genres/text types
  • Develop skills in translation practice
  • Discuss practical problems posed by authentic texts
  • Use research and digital technologies to develop professional translation skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,400-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities support by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll learn advanced grammar structures and new vocabulary relevant to different Italian topics covered in the unit, with emphasis on your year abroad. To choose this module, you need to take the Italian Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Italian Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 6-minute set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • 1 x 500-word set exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module maps to the lower B2 level of the Council of Europe Common European Framework for Languages. To choose this module, you need to take the Italian General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts to help you when looking for employment and living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, and helps you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication functions in a business and organisation context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts, to help you when looking for employment, as well as living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, as well as helping you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication functions in a business and organisational context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL, on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

At the end of this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop a range of communication and intercultural skills in different workplace contexts, helping you when looking for employment, as well as living and working abroad. This module maps to the Council of Europe Common European Framework of Reference for Languages Grade B2, and helps you achieve some of the learning outcomes associated with C1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the differences in working practices between the UK and the target country (TC)
  • Use your expanded language skills to give oral presentations, be prepared for job interviews and produce professional written communications
  • Conduct interpersonal communication in a business and organisation context
  • Research job opportunities, background, structure, products and services of a given company, international organisation or NGO in the target language (TL)
  • Use specialised vocabulary and software to write a multimedia report in the TL on a company or NGO
  • Reflect on your performance of language-based tasks and activities, and support and identify personal development needs
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills such as being able to work both independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentations skills in the target language and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills, as well as your ability to work both independently and collaboratively.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in language-related compulsory seminars looking at vocabulary acquisition, effective use of dictionaries, oral presentation skills in the target language, and summary writing. You'll also develop a variety of graduate skills, such as being able to work independently and collaboratively, self-management, IT, interpersonal communication and presentation skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Find, select and extract information from written, audio-visual and multimodal texts in the target language (TL)
  • Summarise extended texts of various genres and types in the TL
  • Give short individual and group presentations in the TL on cultural, social or current affairs related to the countries or regions you're studying, and respond to questions
  • Support and manage your own learning by researching in the TL and using resources effectively to conduct a variety of language tasks
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 600-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how core cultural theories can inform managers and professionals in their leadership styles and assist them in the development of appropriate management strategies. You'll also look at ways that groups function in different cultural and management contexts, and the implications of this for the management of people.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Comment with critical awareness on management and leadership in the global workplace
  • Identify and evaluate a number of different cross-cultural perspectives on the management of organisations and people
  • Critically analyse chosen aspects of processes and systems for the management of people in different professional cultural contexts
  • Write a professional report, with reference to relevant theory, which identifies management challenges and possible solutions in a specific cross-cultural workplace
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lecures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Mandarin Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Mandarin Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 6-minute set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • 1 x 500-word set exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Mandarin General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities

24 x 2-hour seminars

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Demonstrate a broad understanding of the main debates on cultural spaces and express it concisely and coherently
  • Display skills of observation, description and analysis
  • Demonstrate understanding of the ways in which humans conceptualise, shape, represent and manage cultural space
  • Demonstrate an ability to analyse cultural space from diverse disciplinary perspectives

Explore this module

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Recognise & differentiate key debates in the field of global migration
  • Compare and contrast pull and push factors which have historically explain regional and global migration
  • Adopt an interdisciplinary approach to compare and contrast public policy responses to migration issues in different regional context
  • Evaluate the contributions and/or impacts of migration on a range of social, cultural and economic issues (such as nation-building, housing, mixed marriages, memorialisation, settlement and development)
  • Demonstrate understanding of issues such as political asylum, integration, citizenship and naturalisation in specific countries

Explore this module

What you'll do

Through works such as García Lorca's 'The House of Bernarda Alba' and Polanski's 'Death and the Maiden', you'll examine topics that include legitimacy, gender and class relations, alienation at the modern metropolis, and the impact of political violence and repression in contemporary Spain and Latin America.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the social and political impact of literature and film
  • Analyse cultural representations of Hispanic societies
  • Situate cultural representations of Hispanic societies in their national and historical context
  • Communicate ideas effectively, in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Use academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Reflect on their learning and experience to date and use this as a basis to plan and organise suitable work experience(s) that will enable the development of their professional profile
  • Propose a programme of learning that enables the development and demonstration of specified professional skills
  • Critically evaluate their learning and experience and relate this to their future career goals
  • Communicate the outcomes of their experience, through the effective use of reflective practice

Explore this module

You'll explore conflicting interpretations of Nazism, focusing in particular on who held power in the ‘Third Reich’ as well as key policy areas. You will compare and contrast contentious interpretations by historians and explore why there have been major shifts in the debate since the end of World War II. You'll also address debates about the origins and nature of the Holocaust, as well as the impact of the Nazi period on German and international politics and society from 1945.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the rise of Nazism (fascism)
  • Analyze National Socialist ideologies and specific policies
  • Compare types of support for and dissent to Nazism
  • Debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Analyze the significance of the legacy of the ‘Third Reich’ on German politics and society from 1945 to the present
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures 
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours of independent study for this module. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module. 

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2.000 word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the Spanish-American War (1898) to the end of Franco’s rule (1975) and develop key critical thinking and reflective skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the causes and consequences of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain, considering the international dimension of Spanish politics when appropriate
  • Identify the strategies of radical groups and movements, and explain their contribution to political, economic and cultural life in late-nineteenth and twentieth century Spain
  • Evaluate the theoretical perspectives around the study of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain
  • Analyse the hopes and aspirations of the factions that dominated post-Civil War politics and society in Spain
  • Explain written and visual representations of Spanish reality in the twentieth century
Teaching activities
  • 14 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 4 hours of poster presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish Grade 1 and 2 - General Language and Spanish Grade 1 and 2 - Language in Use modules in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 6-minute set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • 1 x 500-word set exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish General Language Grade 3 and 4 (Part 1) module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Through listening, get information about various topics from authentic audio and video sources
  • Communicate effectively with native speakers of the target language (TL) in social, academic and work-related situations using the appropriate register
  • Extract information about a variety of topics from authentic written sources of different genres
  • Produce written texts for different purposes using appropriate register, style, vocabulary and grammatical structures
  • Recognise relevant linguistic conventions and cultural values of the target countries and respond to them in a culturally informed and sensitive manner
  • Support and manage your own learning by effectively using resources and learning strategies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

In your seminars you'll work with textbooks and take part in communication activities with other students, and seminars are supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). You'll also spend time in language labs, focusing on listening and speaking skills. To choose this module, you need to take the Spanish General Language Grade 3 module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars (focusing on listening and speaking skills)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute oral presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 37 hours of seminars (including film screenings)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 139 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a quiz (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word assignment (70% of final mark) – in this assignment you'll design a website

Core module

What you'll do

This module may be taken in your third year of a four-year degree programme for a period of no less than 15 weeks (one semester) or 30 weeks (full year).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain and illustrate how your knowledge, understanding and subject specific skills (defined in the programme specification and your individual learning agreement) have been enhanced by the learning experience
  • Contrast the culture of the country (or countries) visited with that of your home country
  • Explain and illustrate how the learning experience has increased your knowledge of the world you're functioning in (university, school or workplace)
  • Reflect on your learning, strengths, weaknesses and performance including your ability to speak and write your foreign language(s) more fluently and accurately (if your placement is in a non-English speaking country)
Teaching activities
  • 1200-hours of abroad study
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework project (100% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll examine how they interact with each other and the impact that a successful economy has on traditional Asian values.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this unit successfully, you'll be able to demonstrate an understanding of:

  • The potential, legitimacy and formation of East Asia as a sub-region in the global economy
  • China’s economic reforms and its role in the regional and global economy
  • The impact of China’s growth domestically and internationally
  • The concept of 'developmental state' and its varying applications in East Asian economies
  • Individual economies and the dynamics of their regional configuration
  • The major challenges economies in East Asia face
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 2 x 1-hour coursework tutorials

You'll also have continuous online access to supporting materials, and get regular feedback from teaching staff.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the unit.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a poster (40% of final mark)
  • an essay (60% of final mark)

You'll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before your final assessments.

You'll reflect on 15 years of populist movements, and examine their moderate or radical contestation with liberal democracy in the name of the people. You'll focus on the organisation of populist movements, their leaders, strategies and ideas, and consider how democracies should repond to their national and transnational challenges.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the various key academic debates in this field
  • compare and contrast Western populist organisations, their ideas, and the responses they elicit from governments
  • Apply central concepts involved both in the comparative method and theoretical frameworks to analyse and evaluate case studies
  • Evaluate the various ways in which populism may be interpreted, including the extent to which populism represents a danger for democracy, or a hope for its renewal
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (70% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Critically evaluate given creative texts/activties in terms of their potential for developing language learning.
  • Choose creative texts and activities suitable for exploitation in given classroom contexts and justify this choice.
  • Design a series of lessons using creative texts/activities to develop language skills for specified levels of learners.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll look at regional overviews, a case study of four countries and theme-based regional comparisons, while getting an introduction to comparative and transnational perspectives. You'll learn to appreciate the regional dynamics in historical legacy and current political, socioeconomic and cultural development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare the experiences of East Asian states with those of 'Western' states in the context of colonialism, nationalism, multiculturalism and development
  • Critically analyse how gender, class, and ethnicity are related to nationalism, marriage, employment, and leisure
  • Apply a regional perspective to inter-state dynamics with regard to cultural heritage conservation, colonial legacy, geopolitical structure and economic interaction
  • Collect, analyse, synthesise and present data accurately
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

 

What you'll do

You'll look at the concept that France acts as if it has a 'right' to a global presence, questioning where those assumptions come from and to what end.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the significance of France in contemporary international relations
  • Critically discuss the characteristics of French foreign and defence policy since 1958
  • Critically evaluate contested notions of French power
  • Use appropriate academic conventions and subject specific terminology to communicate effectively
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, and get support from resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist and academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types, making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 350-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of key concepts, models and research findings associated with language, gender and sexuality.
  • Critically engage with texts and identify socially-related assumptions about gender and issues related to gendered discourse.
  • Critically evaluate gender views projected by the media.
  • Appreciate the different methodologies used in research on gender, language and sexuality.
  • Convey complex theories to a non- specialist audience.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 750-word set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 11-minute set oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 90-minute written exam (50% of total mark)

 

What you'll do

You'll learn how the American empire penetrated the politics, culture and economy of Germany. You'll also explore if Germany, the country that caused two world wars and was divided into two states during the cold war, has become more American during this tumultuous century.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess and describe the forces, processes and themes associated with the Americanisation of Germany in the twentieth century
  • Evaluate the historical literature and selected primary sources about Americanisation and American influence on Germany
  • Apply different tools associated with Americanisation and cultural transfer to case studies
  • Communicate ideas effectively
  • Use appropriate academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars 
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at first-person perspectives and contemporary ‘post-memory’ point of views. You'll also evaluate how the Holocaust is represented, and study the ethics of writing and memorialisation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and critically define key concepts that influence Holocaust writing
  • Critically assess the ways in which trauma and memory influence Holocaust writing
  • Analyse the importance of Holocaust writing in the formation of cultural memory
  • Conduct critical readings of Holocaust writing that are informed by a broad selection of critical and theoretical approaches, and reflective of wide-ranging independent research
  • Creatively author a portfolio of innovative reflections on selected Holocaust writing
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word group portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

The skills you'll develop include public speaking, speech analysis and synthesis, memory and note-taking techniques, vocabulary reactivation, speech reformulation and communication skills. You'll also create a blog to review your practice, the practice of your peers, and how theory underpins your practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Listen actively to a dialogue on general topics
  • Show effective communication skills
  • Accurately and fluently translate a message into the target language, understanding relevant language and cultural references from the source language
  • Critically review your practice and that of your peers
  • Reflect on the links between theory and practice, ethics and etiquette
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop consecutive and simultaneous interpreting skills. All seminars will take place in our conference interpreting training suite.

To take this module, you'll need to complete Interpreting 1,  or show equivalent study. You'll also need a minimum grade 5 or equivalent in the target languages.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Listen actively to a dialogue/speech on general and specialised topics
  • Use developed communication skills in realistic scenarios
  • Accurately and fluently translate a message into the target language, understanding relevant language and cultural references from the source language, context and settings
  • Critically review your practice and that of your peers
  • Reflect on the links between theory and practice, ethics and etiquette
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment (40% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Develop a critical understanding of the big issues and contemporary debates in education and teaching
  • Analyse and apply the fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to the planning and evaluation of a lesson plan
  • Understand the importance of safeguarding children
  • Critically reflect on current developments in teaching and learning

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 750-word set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 11-minute set oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 90-minute written exam (50% of total mark)

 

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Compare the structure and functions of different types of social media.
  • Critically evaluate various communication strategies on different types of new media.
  • Evaluate the way social relationships and identities are affected by electronic communication.
  • Develop presentation and public speaking skills.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 750-word set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 11-minute set oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 90-minute written exam (50% of total mark)

 

What you'll do

Through works such as García Lorca's 'The House of Bernarda Alba' and Polanski's 'Death and the Maiden', you'll examine topics that include legitimacy, gender and class relations, alienation at the modern metropolis, and the impact of political violence and repression in contemporary Spain and Latin America.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the social and political impact of literature and film
  • Analyse cultural representations of Hispanic societies
  • Situate cultural representations of Hispanic societies in their national and historical context
  • Communicate ideas effectively, in a manner appropriate to the target audience
  • Use academic and subject specific terminology to present a clearly written discussion of a topic
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically evaluate personal professional profile and relate this to the development of effective job application strategies
  • Research, compare and contrast and critically evalute employers expectations in terms of candidates' skills, attributes and competences in different sectors of employment
  • Reflect on and evaluate their scores from a range of Psychometric tests to prepare for an upcoming employment assessment
  • Communicate professionally the outcomes of their experience to potential employers via the production of a CV, statement, video pitch and a mock and formal job interview

Explore this module

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Reflect on their learning and experience to date and use this as a basis to plan and organise suitable work experience(s) that will enable the development of their professional profile.
  • Propose a programme of learning that enables the development and demonstration of specified professional skills.
  • Critically evaluate their learning and experience and relate this to their future career goals.
  • Communicate the outcomes of their experience, through the effective use of reflective practice.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll base the study on your own research, original thought and personal learning on a specialised topic. Your research can take many forms, and involves personal, independent research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design an achievable project proposal
  • Make use of current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Use established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the subject of the project
  • Discuss and analyse assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your own learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience in the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1 hour research workshops
  • project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 195 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word coursework project (90% of final mark)

You'll explore conflicting interpretations of Nazism, focusing in particular on who held power in the ‘Third Reich’ as well as key policy areas. You will compare and contrast contentious interpretations by historians and explore why there have been major shifts in the debate since the end of World War II. You'll also address debates about the origins and nature of the Holocaust, as well as the impact of the Nazi period on German and international politics and society from 1945.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the rise of Nazism (fascism)
  • Analyze National Socialist ideologies and specific policies
  • Compare types of support for and dissent to Nazism
  • Debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Analyze the significance of the legacy of the ‘Third Reich’ on German politics and society from 1945 to the present
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures 
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours of independent study for this module. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module. 

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2.000 word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the Spanish-American War (1898) to the end of Franco’s rule (1975) and develop key critical thinking and reflective skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the causes and consequences of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain, considering the international dimension of Spanish politics when appropriate
  • Identify the strategies of radical groups and movements, and explain their contribution to political, economic and cultural life in late-nineteenth and twentieth century Spain
  • Evaluate the theoretical perspectives around the study of political and social conflict in twentieth century Spain
  • Analyse the hopes and aspirations of the factions that dominated post-Civil War politics and society in Spain
  • Explain written and visual representations of Spanish reality in the twentieth century
Teaching activities
  • 14 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour discussion classes
  • 4 hours of poster presentations
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll go to seminars in language labs based on written and audio texts, workshops and activities, supported by resources on our virtual learning environment (VLE). To choose this module, you need to take General Language Grade 5, usually achieved through a study abroad year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Get information, ideas and opinions from a variety of simple and complex texts, including some academic texts
  • Through listening, get information, opinions and ideas from a range of simple and complex spoken registers
  • Orally present and discuss topics of interest appropriate to your level, including specialist/academic topics
  • Express yourself with a reasonable degree of accuracy, through a variety of text types making appropriate use of formal and informal registers
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 750-word set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 11-minute set oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • 1 x 90-minute written exam (50% of total mark)

 

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Analyse critically examples of spoken discourse in the workplace
  • Apply theories of interpersonal communication to specific spoken workplace contexts
  • Apply knowledge of rhetoric to deliver a professional and persuasive presentation

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll also get a theoretical framework to improve your translation skills to a professional level, and take part in group work to simulate working environments. To take this module you'll need a native command of English and grade 5 in a target language or a native command of a second language with a B2 level in English.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and analyse key textual and linguistic features of source text types for translation, and comment on difficulties in the translation process
  • Apply and evaluate theoretical principles of translation strategies
  • Create appropriate translation strategies to communicate the textual and linguistic information of source texts in the target language
  • Use a variety of translation methods to convey the information in a source text
  • Suggest appropriate translation strategies for the key textual and linguistic features of a selected source text type
  • Produce an appropriate and commercially viable translation project
  • Demonstrate the necessary analytical and reflective skills to evaluate your skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 250-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,300-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore key issues in text analysis and translation theories, and produce accurate, readable and usable translations for global cross-cultural communication. To take this module you'll need native command or grade 5 knowledge of Chinese, and native or IELTS 5.5 knowledge of English.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the purpose, style and structure of source language texts and identify common challenges with a particular text type genre
  • Apply translation methods learned in class to the specific translation problems found in source language texts, and produce accurate, readable and usable translations
  • Critically evaluate translation strategies and conceptualise them in relation to fundamental principles developed in current East and West translation theories
  • Access and use available resources for further independent development in language and translation skills
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 153 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and an online web design workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute group oral presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word assignment (70% of final mark)

The learning outcomes of this module are:

  • Apply theoretical frameworks to critically analyse examples of written professional communication
  • Evaluate and produce examples of professional writing
  • Apply knowledge of rhetoric to deliver a professional presentation

Explore this module

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • skill development sessions
  • oral practice classes
  • work placement

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • use of software including desktop publishing, podcasts, subtitling and web design
  • case studies
  • blogging
  • examinations
  • book reviews
  • professional and business reports
  • group and individual projects
  • oral presentations
  • portfolio of achievement

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Modern Languages degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting your learning

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.


Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to:

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

International students in a cafe

Global Café

You can meet students from all over the world at the Global Café on Wednesday afternoons. Learn about other's cultures and practise speaking in each other's languages while making new friends and getting to share your own culture.

Student in a tutor meeting

Language Corner

Meet with a language tutor, get help with specific challenges and practise your skills with proficient speakers of your chosen language in this optional weekly drop-in session.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2022 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

In your third year for your placement abroad, you’ll need to fund the costs of travel, transport and accommodation. The exact costs will depend on the destination. If you're studying at one of our partner universities, you won't need to pay fees at your host institution, but there may be other costs such as visa, insurance or extra tuition. If you choose to work abroad, can help you find an internship, which may be paid or unpaid.

During your placement year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, this discount amounts to 90% of the year’s fees. Placement year tuition fees are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

Enhance your degree with an internationally recognised qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages: the Trinity College London Cert TESOL. This opportunity is conditional on a successful performance in an entry test and interview in order to fulfil professional requirements.

There's no cost if you take the Trinity College London Teaching Practice module as one of your options.

If you choose to take this module outside your planned curriculum, there's a fee of £355.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

You can still apply for this course to study with us in September 2022 by using Clearing.

Once you have your exam results:

If you're not ready to apply yet, why not learn more about how Clearing works, book a call-back for results day. or sign-up for our Clearing updates and visit days.

Our Clearing hotline will be open as follows:

  • 9am - 5pm Monday to Thursday
  • 9am - 4pm Fridays
  • Thursday 18 August (A and T level results day) 8am - 8pm
  • Friday 19 August 8am - 7pm
  • Saturday 20 August 10am - 3pm

To start this course in 2023, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – R902
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.