Sound editing software on Mac screen
UCAS Code
GJ49
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

If you want a career in the music industry in a creative or technical capacity, this professionally accredited BSc (Hons) Music and Sound Technology degree is the perfect course for you.

Using the same technology as the professionals, you'll learn to manage complex recording sessions and perform and compose music for media such as film and video games.

If you’ve got the imagination and determination, we’ll help you develop skills that allow you to thrive in the music industry. At the end of the course, you'll be set for a career in a variety of roles, from producing music to working as a studio engineer.

Accredited by

This course is accredited by JAMES (Joint Audio Media Education Support). JAMES is a group of industry professionals and employers that represent the APRS (Association of Professional Recording Services), MPG (The Music Producers Guild) and associate industry bodies.

The JAMES accreditation lets potential employers know that this course gives you the relevant skills and abilities you need to work in the music industry when you graduate. This gives you an edge over students who didn’t do an accredited course when you’re applying for jobs.

We’re also one of only two Universities in the country to be a Wwise certified school, enabling us to teach and use Wwise game audio software, and we're an Avid Learning Partner which means we deliver Protools training to Avid's professional standards.

You are also able to access additional certificates with both Wwise and Protools to enhance your future career prospects.

What you'll experience

On this Music and Sound Technology degree course you'll:

  • Learn the professional and practical skills you need to work effectively in the music industry
  • Tackle topics like games audio, composition, sound design, and studio recording and production
  • Be taught by a team of lecturers who have diverse musical interests and experience in areas such as sonic art, digital and analogue recording, popular music performance, composition and songwriting
  • Be able to manage complex recording sessions and generate music, sounds and effects for everything from films to art installations
  • Get the chance to take an optional Protools certification unit as part of your degree
  • Have the opportunity to further supplement your musical talents by joining the University's orchestra, choir, wind band or big band

You’ll get your hands on some exciting gear in our studio suites, including:

  • A valve 32 channel TL audio mixing desk
  • An SSL Matrix 2 console with 10 Neve 1074 preamps and 16 channels of Neve and SSL dynamics and EQ
  • A 7.1 surround studio (Genelec) including a Slate Raven multi-touch console for multichannel work and spatial audio projects
  • A Buchla System 7 synthesizer (one of only two in the UK and the only one in a European university)
  • 4 Oakley Modular synthesizers
  • iMac Dual i7 computers running Logic Pro X, Pro Tools, Ableton Live, Max/MSP (including Max for Live), Native Instruments Komplete (including Reaktor), Pure Data and Game engine software

Careers and opportunities

When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry.

What jobs can you do with a Music and Sound Technology degree?

Previous graduates have gone on to work in roles such as:

  • audio developer
  • music technology lecturer
  • musical technician
  • studio manager
  • studio engineer
  • music teacher
  • game audio professionals (composition and sound design)

Other graduates have continued their studies at postgraduate level or set up successful businesses with help and support from the University.

After you graduate, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

There hasn’t been anything I haven’t enjoyed on this course – teaching music is hopefully going to be my destination after I graduate.

Ken Wharton-Emms, BSc (Hons) Music and Sound Technology

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Music and Technology degree

Each unit on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study units worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 units worth 20 credits and 1 unit worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll explore non-traditional approaches to music by analysing musical examples and applying these techniques with music manipulation software, drawing on historical precedents and current practice in the field. You develop your knowledge, understanding and practical expertise in compositional processes by studying examples and applying the techniques to your own work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create and develop musical ideas using creative music technology techniques
  • Evaluate approaches to creative music technology composition, with consideration for musical context
  • Produce a creative music technology portfolio that demonstrates clear compositional theme(s) and appropriate form
  • Discuss your work in context
  • Reflect on your own and others' approaches to composition, linking compositional processes to the musical outcome
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes, supervised workshops and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (25% of final mark)
  • a set coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll develop your understanding of the digital culture we live in and the impact this has on the cultural and creative industries.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and evaluate key principles and concepts in the field of digital culture
  • Identify and explore the opportunities and challenges of a digital economy
  • Identify and assess how digital technology changes the cultural and creative industries
  • Evaluate the skills you need for a career in the cultural and creative industries and identify how to improve and enhance your personal weaknesses
  • Research and plan how to achieve career goals and evaluate your progress
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 4 x 1-hour seminars
  • 10 x 1-hour practical workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (50% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop practical recording techniques and learn to evaluate your recording skills, identifying and evaluating the equipment used in the studio recording process. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and minimise factors that reduce quality in the recording chain
  • Compare and evaluate microphone techniques
  • Use contemporary processing techniques to correct and/or enhance recordings
  • Work, solve problems, and communicate effectively as part of a production team
  • Demonstrate recording techniques in the production of an audio presentation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and workshops, lectures and tutorials. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 4-minute audio presentation (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine the emergence, application and influence of technology on creative practice and develop skills in research and analysis. You'll also look at ideas and creative approaches related to the module in a practical project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore approaches to the creative use of technology in music based on an examination of existing works
  • Investigate specific musical examples and compose original music based on an examination of existing works
  • Identify, locate and research available academic sources and publications and use APA style to reference them
  • Demonstrate analytical discourse and skill development
  • Organise, manage and participate in an informed presentation project
  • Organise, manage and participate in a musical composition and/or performance based on topics relevant to the module
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, supervision meetings, tutorials and seminars. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a practical exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn sound design, music composition, recording and audio editing techniques, and develop skills relevant to key professional roles in related industries.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create appropriate original sound or music to accompany moving image, informed by relevant theory and analysis of existing techniques and works
  • Record, edit, arrange and mix the various soundtrack elements for visual media
  • Investigate and review the relationships between visual imagery and sound within a chosen context, with references to relevant theory, examples and aesthetic considerations
  • Assess, reflect upon and evaluate the success of both the process and the end result
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll get an introduction to scientific sound theories through sound design, sound synthesis, sound art, music composition and audio editing techniques. You'll also develop your understanding of scientific, social, contextual and aesthetic issues in physical sound theory and its roles in society.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use software sound synthesis to produce sound
  • Use software sound synthesis to identify sound sources, software editors and modifiers
  • Explore audio sampling, sound manipulation and digital theory such as A/D and D/A conversion theory, sample resolution, sample editing and looping
  • Create a sample library and application with specific references to relevant sound theory considering historic examples and aesthetic considerations
  • Assess, reflect on and communicate the success of the process and the end result (your composition artefact and blog)
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a project (30% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you’ll do

You'll also learn the practical and theoretical skills to design and conduct academic research.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the nature, uses and limitations of a variety of research methods
  • Identify and evaluate one or more appropriate research methods for a specified piece of independent study
  • Prepare a preliminary review of the literature on a specified topic in line with the principles of good scholarship
  • Identify the qualifications, skill sets, entry points and career opportunities that relate to a specified career path
  • Identify and appraise individual strengths, weaknesses and preferences for a specified career path
Teaching activities
  • 3 x 2-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 3 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine the underpinning digital audio theory behind common sound manipulation techniques, creating and manipulating sound through synthesis tools, effects and algorithmic composition.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conceive, plan and design an original, interactive sound application
  • Use established audio techniques to trigger, generate and manipulate audio
  • Practically demonstrate an understanding of digital audio and sound design concepts through composition and supporting notes
  • Critically place your work into a wider musical context and evaluate the success of your application
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a software artefact (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn about the processes required for recording inside and outside the studio environment, and evaluate the recording techniques and methods you used. To choose this module you need to take the Introduction to Studio Techniques module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work as part of a recording production team
  • Operate a live or studio client-based recording process
  • Apply post-production techniques to produce a finished recording
  • Review the recording processes, team member roles, and the quality of the final results
  • Understand the planning and organisation you'll need to meet client requirements on a project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes, workshops and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a practical coursework exercise (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll take this optional module as part of the second year of your course.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 2,000-word report (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll learn about acoustic analysis and evaluation of recorded material and environmental locations, applying these principles to the design of a recording studio space. You'll also develop your understanding of live performance sound technologies and principles.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate tools and techniques to analyse acoustic behaviour
  • Demonstrate applied understanding of acoustic theory and principles in the implementation of studio design, recording and performance locations/environments
  • Design and develop an appropriate plan or strategy for a recording or performance considering acoustic properties and theory
  • Reflect on and evaluate the processes of measurement, analysis and design
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2 x coursework exercises (50% of final mark, each).

What you’ll do

You'll also apply and refine your coding and debugging techniques to your knowledge of audio effects, digital signal processing (DSP) and computational music.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan, compose and design an original audio software artefact
  • Make justified decisions when creating an original audio software artefact
  • Demonstrate your practical knowledge and understanding of programming and computational sound concepts
  • Critically evaluate the success of your work against the project aims
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials, lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module."

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a coursework exercise (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll be introduced to composition techniques that don't require you to read or write music conventionally, as well as key concepts and theories of musical practice and composition. You'll also look at contemporary contextual issues relevant to the creative practice in your portfolio.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate practical musicianship and composition skills and techniques
  • Demonstrate a theoretical understanding of topics in the module
  • Arrange, rehearse, perform and produce original compositions
  • Use analytical skills and understand contextual issues related to composition
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio of original music compositions (70% of final mark)
  • a 2,000 word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop creative coding skills and explore topics such as algorithmic art, video, animation, sound, music, lyrics, poems or literature.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Generate creative ideas and express them algorithmically
  • Conceive, plan and create an original creative coding artefact
  • Apply programming concepts to creative ideas, demonstrating an understanding of coding principles and practice
  • Demonstrate research-informed practice
  • Critically reflect upon and evaluate the success of your project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
  • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
  • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn how to use MIDI controllers to address aesthetic considerations of a performance and to 'play' the laptop to integrate with live instruments in an ensemble. You'll develop a critical understanding of your work and relate it to contemporary, historical, social, cultural and technological contexts.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Prepare and complete a performance using real-time sampling techniques
  • Collaborate and interact with other musicians in the creation of a performance
  • Critically analyse and discuss the issues and processes necessary for software-based performance
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute practical exercise (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn to engage with current industry practice and develop your understanding of the legal and financial implications to setting up and running a small business as well as contextual issues around industry promotion.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and create an original product or service for an identified customer base
  • Investigate and analyse key aspects of marketing and promotion
  • Apply entrepreneurial approaches to create a business for the promotion of your product or service
  • Understand the legal and financial factors involved in starting a small business
  • Review your project with particular reference to contextual and theoretical issues
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials, seminars, lectures and project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a coursework project (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify future career goals and reflect on these to develop a personal development plan (programme of learning), which includes suitable work experience and skills/knowledge development opportunities
  • Arrange suitable work experience, engage with personal development opportunities and analyse relevant literature relating to enhancing your employment opportunities
  • Critically evaluate and articulate your learning (knowledge, skills and attributes) in relation to your future career goals
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 188 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn skills in areas such as composition, re-sequencing, re-orchestration, switching, transitions, testing, mixing and system optimisation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design immersive and interactive soundscapes incorporating analysis of games and their required audio assets
  • Create audio assets for game soundscapes using recording, synthesis and sound manipulation techniques as appropriate
  • Compose adaptive music for games with consideration for non-linear interaction
  • Integrate original sound and music assets using game audio middleware to realise interactive soundscapes and adaptive music that respond to gameplay
  • Apply mixing techniques to blend and balance sound and music assets with consideration for non-linear interaction
  • Test audio performance and apply optimisation techniques to ensure audio playback stays within allocated system resources
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes, supervised workshop an project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on your effectiveness at tasks that use employability skills such as project planning, communication, time management, leadership and teamwork
  • Evaluate the theory and complete the practice of establishing and running a business enterprise
  • Understand the systems commonly used to plan, record and monitor business decisions and company transactions
  • Critically reflect on the factors that contribute towards the success or failure of business start ups
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 2,000 word report (50% of your final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of your final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll develop academic research and academic writing, literature and self-expression skills, and develop and demonstrate relevant professional, academic and technical skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Initiate and manage the preparatory phase of a practice, creative or research project appropriate for your programme of study
  • Conduct a scholarly review of existing work in your selected area together with an account of your own work
  • Critically evaluate and justify the choices you make and approaches you take to plan the solution of the project problem/domain
  • Communicate the outcomes of your preparatory project activities in a professional and scholarly manner
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 185 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your academic research and academic writing, literature and self-expression skills, and develop and demonstrate relevant professional, academic and technical skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Initiate and manage the resolution of a practice, creative or research project appropriate for your programme of study
  • Apply the findings from a scholarly review of existing work in your selected area, together with an account of your own work
  • Critically evaluate and justify the choices you make, and the approaches you take, to plan the solution of the project problem/domain
  • Communicate the outcomes of your project resolution activities in a professional and scholarly manner
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 190 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 5,000-word report (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

This includes developing systems and content that responds to real-time data (including user input, player and object states, game and physics engine data).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and develop non-linear audio systems with accompanying media assets (music and sound) for interactive media and computer games
  • Build systems using visual programming and scripting
  • Produce a reactive or interactive artefact that utilises game engine and audio system programming and design technologies
  • Work professionally when developing and implementing audio systems
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • project output (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore ideas of sonic art, sound installations, multimedia production, avant-garde composition and performance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and critique sound/music from historical and current practitioners
  • Use your analysis to inform your sound/music practice
  • Apply appropriate sound/music tools and techniques to the design and production of a project
  • Demonstrate awareness of debates around the placing of the work in wider contexts
  • Critically evaluate the success of the project and identify possible future directions
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend project supervision meetings, lectures, practical classes and workshops and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a coursework project (75% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

This module has scientific, technical and commercial applications and will give you an independent and experimental approach to audio and music technologies. You'll create original musical artefacts that could be used commercially, scientifically or in a social-economic and educational context.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a commercial audio artefact using Visual Dataflow computer programming technologies
  • Evaluate the design of musical sound synthesis and manipulation software
  • Use analysis of modular synthesis/processing and emerging technologies to evaluate designs
  • Critically evaluate and explain the technical and commercial worth of bespoke audio applications
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a project (30% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (70% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and undertake musical composition for a range of forces
  • Demonstrate advanced techniques of orchestration
  • Use music notation or audio software to compose and present professional quality music
  • Demonstrate an understanding of advanced musical compositional or notational techniques by assimilating and reproducing them in your own compositions
  • Demonstrate critical and analytical skills to your own and others’ musical compositions with regard to the role of a composer in society
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars, project supervision meetings and tutorials. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a portfolio of compositions (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll relate your understanding of these issues to broader philosophical concerns. This module will further develop your research habit and your ability to understand the context and meaning of modern music.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critique key developments in contemporary music
  • Critically review the concept of cross-cultural perspective in relation to music and its impact on genres and styles
  • Critically analyse a key thematic area in depth
  • Confidently and fluently construct a coherent academic argument
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and tutorials. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about sound design and production techniques used in current creative industries. You'll also develop knowledge of audio synthesis systems and industry techniques.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and record a collection of original sound synthesis artefacts using industry tools and techniques
  • Build comprehensive modular synthesis patches for creative music and sound design practices
  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of sound design concepts using synthesis resources
  • Apply the use of symbolic thinking in digital and analogue sound computing modules when creating sound artefacts
  • Demonstrate critical reflection and place your work in context
  • Evaluate the success of your synthesis artefacts against the stated aims
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a portfolio of original musical compositions (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll get experience managing recording projects, operating studio equipment, evaluating your recording skills and methods, and considering genre when using resources. To choose this module you need to take the Recording and Production Techniques module in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Review the function and relevance of studio recording equipment in relation to a specific recording project
  • Implement the recording process confidently
  • Critically assess the production value and operational status of studio equipment for recording projects
  • Evaluate the quality and process of final recordings
  • Identify key issues and themes from the history of recorded music
  • Plan, organise and execute a music production to a professional standard
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a practical exercise (40% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • practical projects
  • working journals
  • academic and evaluative essays
  • performances
  • oral presentations
  • examinations
  • case studies

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the music industry.

Previous students have done placements at organisations such as:

  • Hot Vox Studios
  • Blackhill Studios
  • Mayfield Studios

In your placement year, you can also study abroad, or set up a business on your own or in a group with fellow students.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

You'll also be able to use our CCI Creative Careers service to learn extra, or get help with learning new or improving existing skills from our CCI Creative Skills team.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies, further develop your skills and build your portfolio.

Learning support

As well as support by faculty teaching staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • practical workshops
  • work placements

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Music and Sound Technology degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, and project and studio supervision for about 10 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You’ll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

Student support advisor

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

Academic skills tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Creative skills tutors

If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.

IT and computing support

Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Music and Sound Technology degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

Selection process
  • A relevant qualification or experience in music/sound is required. Applicants without relevant qualifications may be asked to submit a digital portfolio.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £15,100 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 units a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each unit.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

If you take the Student Enterprise Module, you’ll need to pay an additional cost of approximately £20.

You may need to contribute up to £20 towards occasional coach trips.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – GJ49
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

This site uses cookies. Click here to view our cookie policy message.

Accept and close