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Geography BA (Hons)

Study human geography on this degree accredited by the Royal Geographical Society, including themes such as conservation, sustainability, geopolitics, and economic and urban development.

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University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

L700

Accreditation:

This course is Accredited

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

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If you're fascinated by the interrelationship between people, place and environment, this BA (Hons) Geography degree, accredited by the Royal Geographical Society (RGS), provides the skills and knowledge you need to help shape the future of the planet.

You'll investigate how we can preserve both the natural environment and the social and economic wellbeing of human populations. When you graduate, you'll have what you need to work in a wide range of areas, such as within urban or environmental planning, the energy sector, teaching or research.

Course highlights

  • Create your own bespoke final year to match your interests and career ambitions by choosing from an optional list of modules, including environment and society, creative economy and urban placemaking and gender and development
  • Learn to use GIS to solve societal problems including industry-standard technology, laser survey technology, drones, and photogrammetry equipment
  • Experience some of the societies, cultures and landscapes you’re studying through fieldwork, including in places such as Berlin, Malta, Sicily and Uganda
  • Choose to study abroad at one of our partner universities in Canada, Australia, Germany, Malta, Slovakia, Hungary and France, or build experience on a work placement at an organisation like the Environment Agency or Natural England
Royal Geographical Society with IBG. Accredited programme

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Royal Geographical Society. This shows the teaching on this course is of the highest quality and has been approved by an independent body of academics and industrialists.

An aerial shot of a tree in the centre of a roundabout in a city centre

What's the difference between BA and BSc Geography?

Our BA (Hons) Geography focuses on human geography – the ways in which communities, cultures and societies interact with the environment, while BSc (Hons) Geography is more to do with the science of the natural physical world.

Learn more about these courses 

Geography at the University of Portsmouth

Students and staff discuss studying geography at the University of Portsmouth.

Dr Caroline Day: The broad subjects you might cover are things like geographies of development, the creative economy, transport and sustainability and society and place.

Dr Mark Hardiman: Here at Portsmouth it’s not just about being in a lecture, it’s about going out there and experiencing sometimes quite extreme environments and that’s best exemplified by our field trips. You get to see where global warming is happening now, very rapidly.

Lydia: What I learnt from the field trip was how to work in a team with a group of people and how to manage my time.

Luke: Going on field trips, such as to Finland, has helped me see different cultures and different environments very different to the UK and I think that helps me build as a person.

Lydia: Portsmouth gives me the ability to develop professionally and personally. I’ve learnt a lot from being at the University.

Dr Caroline Day: Coming to Portsmouth will offer students a real sense of geography in action.

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Clearing is open

This course is available through Clearing.

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

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Connected Degrees

Only at Portsmouth you have the choice to take a traditional sandwich placement before your third year, or to take your placement after your final year.

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Discover how Clearing works

Clearing 2024 opens on 5 July and closes on 21 October

Every year thousands of students find their ideal undergraduate course through Clearing. Clearing matches students who are looking for a different course or university from their original choice, or who are applying for the very first time after 30 June, to courses that universities still have places on.

The majority of people apply through Clearing once they receive their exam results on A level / T level results day (15 August 2024).

You can apply through Clearing if:

  • You don't meet the conditions of your offer for your firm (first) or insurance (second) choice courses
  • Your exam results are better than you expected and you want to change your course or university 
  • You don't hold any offers
  • You've accepted an offer but changed your mind about the course you want to do
  • You're applying for the first time after 30 June 2024 

Find out more on UCAS

Yes, we welcome Clearing applications from international students and you can apply in exactly the same way as UK students do. 

The majority of UK students apply through Clearing once they receive their A level / T level results in August 2024, so as an international student if you already have your exam results you can apply when Clearing opens. 

Make sure that you have time to get your visa, funding, and English language certification sorted out before the beginning of term.

If you would like further information or guidance, please contact our international office for advice. 

The entry requirements for courses can change in Clearing but if you want an idea of what grades we usually accept, take a look at our undergraduate course pages.

Even if you don't quite meet the entry requirements, we'd still encourage you to apply as you could still get a place.

Book your place at our summer Open Day

Yes, join us on campus Saturday 6 July 2024, 8.30am-4pm

Book your place

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

Entry requirements

BA (Hons) Geography degree entry requirements

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent. (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent. (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects or GCSEs – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Facilities and specialist equipment

GIS and Remote Sensing Laboratory

Discover more about the planet's physical structures and scientific processes, such as glaciers and coastal flooding, using drone data, aerial and satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems.

Aerial view of scenic Greenland Glaciers and icebergs
Explore the lab

Physical Geography and Meteorology Laboratories

Use the latest physical and meteorological equipment in our labs, including a rainfall simulator and automatic weather stations.

Physical geography and meteorology lab
Learn more about the lab

Environmental Technology Field Station

Conduct tests and analyse samples currently in the ecosystem in a fully-operational waterworks in nearby Petersfield complete with microbiology and environmental chemistry labs.

Aerial view of the environmental technology field station
Explore Station

Careers and opportunities

On this BA (Hons) Geography, you’ll learn how to sustainably develop urban areas, and how governments, business and individuals can help protect the planet for future generations. You’ll examine themes such as conservation, sustainability, geopolitics, and economic and urban development, and hunt for answers to big questions about the world and society. 

Geography graduates are valuable in all sorts of job roles. As well as learning skills to help you understand and engage with the world, you’ll develop as a professional. You’ll come away as a confident communicator, able to solve problems, make good decisions and work well with others.

When you graduate, you'll be ready for a career in a wide range of important fields and sectors, with technical and professional skills many employers are looking for. Our previous students have gone onto work in areas such as transport planning, engineering, civil services, teaching and research.

As the Royal Geographical Society state, 74.8% of geography graduates enter professional-level jobs after graduation, compared to an average of 60.8% for the social sciences in general.

It also notes data from the Department for Education that puts geography among the top subjects for graduate earnings.

BA Geography or BSc Geography?

Our BA (Hons) Geography focuses on human geography – the ways in which communities, cultures and societies interact with the environment, while BSc (Hons) Geography is more to do with the science of the natural physical world.

Whichever you choose, you'll study both types of geography in your first year, before picking modules on either (or both) in years 2 and 3.

Your module choices will determine whether you graduate with a BA or a BSc Geography, so it helps to know which area interests you most and suits your career aspirations better before choosing which degree to study.

What jobs can you do with a geography degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • geo-environmental consultant
  • transport planner
  • urban planner
  • GIS analyst
  • spatial analyst
  • operations watchkeeper
  • geography teacher

Graduate destinations

Organisations our graduates have gone on to work for include:

  • Mott McDonald
  • AECOM
  • Savills
  • Bulb
  • Department of Business and Energy
  • Thames Water
  • Hampshire County Council

You could also go on to study at postgraduate level.

Ongoing careers support

After you graduate, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability Service as you advance in your career.

Placement year (optional)

Either before or following your third year, you can opt for a work placement year to gain valuable longer-term work experience in the industry. Placements give you the opportunity to apply what you've learnt so far in a real workplace, boosting your employability and making you attractive to employers after graduation.

You can work for a company or organisation here in the UK or overseas – some Geography students have chosen Australia, Spain or Malta for their placement year.

Whichever route you choose, you'll receive support and guidance. Our specialist team of Science and Health Careers advisors can help you with finding a work placement and improving your employability skills. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search – including help with applications and interviews – and support throughout your placement year.

You'll also hear guest speakers from potential employers and get support from students who have returned from their placements.

Potential roles

Previous students have taken placement roles such as:

  • environmental scientist
  • research scientist
  • environmental assessment officer
  • surveyor
  • flood risk assessor
  • teacher

Potential destinations

They've completed placements at organisations including:

  • Atkins Global
  • Pfizer Research and Development
  • Hampshire Ecological Services
  • The Environment Agency
  • Natural England

Study abroad

You’ll also have the chance to study abroad at one of our partner universities in Canada, Australia, Germany, Malta, Slovakia, Hungary or France, which is a fantastic opportunity to explore a new destination and experience the world as an international student.

Many of our students describe their time spent studying overseas as truly life-changing, as well as an excellent way to stand out to future employers.

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

What you'll study

Core modules

You’ll get an introduction to academic skills for geography and environmental students in weekly tutorial sessions. You’ll cover essay writing, referencing, plagiarism, presentations, searching literature, note taking, and CV writing.

You’ll cover the basic concepts of systems analysis as applied to physical environmental systems, including concepts of equilibrium, thresholds and change. You’ll examine physical systems on a global scale, exploring the key components that drive environmental systems and natural hazards and how they are inter-related. You’ll then look at physical systems on a smaller scale to learn about the operation of physical environmental systems at the scale of human intervention.

You’ll collect and record data in the field, and learn how to identify appropriate ways of analysing it. Work both independently and as part of a team in the field, you’ll evaluate your own and one another’s contributions to group outcomes. You’ll also communicate and reflect on your findings via scientific reports and poster presentations.

You’ll cover the full range of techniques commonly applied by geographers, including cartography, remote sensing, field surveying, experimental design, laboratory use, social science research methods, and statistics. You’ll use key software in structured practicals, including Excel and Adobe Illustrator.

Through case studies, in-depth lectures and workshops, you’ll think about the nature and extent of human impact on the environment, and learn about the complexities of managing environmental, population and resource change at local and global levels.

You’ll consider the relationships between economic, political, social and cultural systems, both in general and in particular places. Explore spatial and temporal scale, as well as the social construction, evolution and distinctiveness of place. You’ll also think about the implications and problems of global processes for particular parts of the world.

Core modules

Explore a city that has seen tremendous change over the last 30 years. You'll seek to understand urban change through the lenses of memory and memorialisation, grand urban redevelopment schemes and nation, creative city policy, gentrification and housing. You'll be introduced to and engage in a number of research and data collection exercises that will help develop your ability to undertake research in the field. You'll prepare a teaching activity for a group before they depart for Berlin and deliver this in the field, introducing you to skills in teamwork, and the ability to share skill and knowledge with others. In the careers element of the module, you'll explore potential career pathways for Geographers and develop the skills required to apply for jobs.

On this course you'll:

  • Plan the experimental approach for a scientific investigation, including ethics and risk assessment.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in research skills.
  • Analyse and interpret scientific data.
  • Demonstrate comprehension in molecular biology methods.

Optional modules

You'll undertake a minimum of 80 hours of placement work, voluntary work or relevant professional experience. You'll develop your work experience and enhance your CV ready for either a year-long placement or to apply for jobs. You'll gain organisation and communication skills, and experience relevant to your future career as you critically reflect on your learning experience and engagement with the Careers and Employability Service and the science Faculty Placements Office. Your engagement will also be further overseen by your tutor and module coordinator. 

You'll also have access to supporting workshops that are supplemented by work based learning hours.

Your 80 hours of work experience should take place between between the June period at the end of level 4 and before the end of the first teaching block at level 5, enabling you to complete assessments. You'll also need to secure relevant employment, volunteering or placement opportunity by the start of teaching block 1 during your second year.

You’ll examine social, cultural, political and economic development from both theoretical and policy perspectives. Through lectures, seminars and a museum visit, you’ll engage with key development processes and debates at a range of geographical scales, including the global, national, community, household and individual levels.

You’ll learn core theory underpinning GIS and RS, before applying the theory through the use of industry standard software. You’ll explore the capture, interpretation and analysis of geographical and environmental data from a variety of sources to explore 'real world' problems and challenges.

You’ll study glacial processes and landforms using a range of examples from glacial environments. You’ll learn concepts and theory in a series of lectures, before getting to grips with this in action in practical sessions and seminars.

You’ll get familiar with the big issues and contemporary debates in education studies as well as the role and expectations of a teacher.

You’ll develops fundamental knowledge and skills that teachers require, as well as your capability to structure and critique a lesson plan.

You’ll get an introduction to fluvial geomorphology and a foundation in the discipline for developing a career in the environmental management sector. You’ll examine fluvial forms and processes, including flow dynamics and the mechanics of sediment erosion, transport and deposition. Take part in lab classes to demonstrate fundamental processes of open channel flow and sediment transport in alluvial rivers. You’ll also complete a project to show what you’ve learned about river channel processes in the context of an environmental management issue.

You’ll examine the complex and contested concept of Sustainable Development and the spectrum of views that surround it, as well as its roots, origins and core principles. You’ll explore the problems of achieving sustainable management of the environment, with reference to finite and renewable resources. You’ll also think about different approaches to sustainable management at different scales and in different geographical regions using empirical case studies.

You'll consider aspects of a city such as urban plannng, urban design, neighbourhoods, housing, town centres, community facilities, parks, access to greenspace, leisure and retail facilities and the role of these in life quality. You'll also consider how these 'urban goods' are unevenly distributed along lines of social class, race, gender, age, disability and sexuality.

You’ll focus on understanding volcanoes as systems, examining mantle-to-surface magmatic processes and how to identify key volcanic rocks and minerals. You’ll explore volcano-sedimentary sequences alongside geochemical and isotopic data to understand volcanic eruptive histories and magmatic evolution over time. Finally, you’ll also consider the plethora of volcanic hazards and risks alongside risk management strategies as well as other human-volcano interactions.

Through interactive lectures with academics, speakers and professionals, you'll discuss, debate and complete practical exercises exploring wildlife crime alongside your classmates.

You'll spend time examining wildlife crimes and the factors behind them, as well as environmental justice and sustainability.

You’ll develop your powers of critical analysis and evaluation, alongside your capacity for empathy and insight. Topics you’ll cover include contrasting theories and/or policies, reflection on your own personal experiences and how these relate to contemporary issues, and critical consideration of approaches to the study of children and young people.

Core modules

Supported by your Academic Tutor, you'll select and manage information and competently undertake research tasks. You'll assess health and safety, the ethical considerations in pursuing independent research, and critically evaluate your findings against knowledge in available academic literature. You'll learn to discuss and communicate your key findings found from your research and write a dissertation in accordance with academic conventions.

Optional modules

You’ll examine the physical factors driving climate over history and the signatures of modern anthropogenic influence. Through climate modelling software, you'll investigate future warming scenarios and impacts regionally and globally. In a self-directed study, you'll assess vulnerabilities and solutions - evaluating possibilities for adaptation and mitigating climate change.

You’ll examine the development of core social theories and discourses that underpin the human and environmental management of these environments and the recreational activities that take place within them. You’ll then apply these concepts to a broad range of real-world issues, including land use planning, ecotourism, climate change and conservation, and the management of recreational and leisure activities.

You’ll learn about the dynamic complexity of cold environments through first-hand field experience, seeking to explain how physical and/or human processes at work in cold environments produce a range of environmental outcomes. This module also includes a series of lectures that will set your field experience in the wider context of environmental change in Arctic and/or planning of cold urban environments for environmental sustainability.

On this module you'll:

  • Outline the basic principles of conservation, including anthropogenic factors.
  • Critically evaluate the biogeography and conservation literature.
  • Analyse and creatively interpret conservation data.
  • Communicate conservation principles effectively, in a style suitable for multiple audiences.

You'll think about how cultural and creative industries have become the answer for de-industrialised cities looking for a new economic role. You’ll consider the role of the Creative Economy to drive sustained urban economic growth and regional development. Working with local creative workers and looking at artist hubs, co-working spaces, maker-spaces, freelance and home-based businesses, you'll explore who can be a creative worker, how/where they can perform work, and how this can change or gentrify our neighbourhoods.

You’ll learn essential data analysis skills you’ll need for your future career, including how to produce a carbon audit to current Defra standards and how to present data to a range of stakeholders. You’ll also produce a consultancy-style report evaluating environmental impacts and potential savings, and explore the role of environmental impact assessment in the planning system.

You’ll become familiar with the main environmental pollutants, how they’re transferred within and between various media and how they interact with biota to create an environmental risk. You’ll explore the waste management hierarchy and the scientific and technical processes involved with waste management operations.

As well as exploring the theoretical approaches to gender and development thought, and especially feminist thought, you’ll also examine a series of axes of diversity in relation to women's and men's lives in the South. You’ll focus on the obstacles in achieving equality between men and women, and think about the theoretical and conceptual approaches to understanding and analysing gender issues in the global South.

You’ll consider these hazards from a number of angles, including how these are expressed upon landscapes, the nature of natural hazards through a range of spatial and temporal scales, and the effect these have on past and present human populations and civilisations. You’ll look at geophysical hazards like earthquakes, biological hazards such as pandemics, hydrological hazards like droughts, climatological hazards such as wildfires, and anthropological hazards like nuclear war.

You’ll get familiar with the big issues and contemporary debates in education studies as well as the role and expectations of a teacher.

You’ll develops fundamental knowledge and skills that teachers require, as well as your capability to structure and critique a lesson plan.

On this module, you’ll study Quaternary geology - the branch of geology that studies developments from 2.58 million years ago to the present day. You’ll investigate past environments and associated landform-sediment assemblages of relevance to engineering geologists, geologists and geographers, including glacial and periglacial ground models, fluvial sediments and interglacial environments.

You’ll learn the fundamentals of atmospheric physics (radiation, hydrological cycle, pressure patterns) and how this creates weather patterns across the globe. Topics include extreme weather events, storm patterns, jet streams, atmospheric teleconnections and circulation. You’ll also look at spatial variation in climate, and examine controls of micro, local and regional climates, including urbanisation, vegetation, topographical and coastal influences.

Boost your employability by taking an industry-based work placement year with a relevant organisation or immerse yourself in another culture by studying for a year at one of our partner universities worldwide.

This is an amazing opportunity to either put everything you’ve learned so far into action in a real workplace or expand your horizons and set yourself up for your future career by studying abroad and becoming a student ambassador for our university.

Depending on what you choose, we’ll help you find and secure an exciting placement opportunity within an appropriate company or organisation, or you’ll expand your global perspective and develop additional skills to boost your future career during a study abroad year.

This is a Connected Degree

We're the only university that gives you the flexibility to choose when to take a work placement. Take it after your 2nd year, before returning to finish your studies. Or after your final year, connecting you into the workplace.

If you're not sure if or when to take your placement, don't worry. You'll have plenty of time to settle into your studies and explore your options before making your choice.

Find out more about Connected Degrees

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • coursework
  • examinations
  • contributions to electronic discussion forums
  • web page design
  • posters
  • projects
  • presentations
  • portfolios

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • one-to-one tutorials
  • workshops

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Geography degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, practical classes and workshops and external visits for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £19,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £19,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

 

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Compulsory fieldwork

Your course fees cover the cost of travel and accommodation for compulsory fieldwork, but you’ll need to budget for meals and subsistence costs.

Optional fieldwork

On some of the optional units in the final year of the course, you’ll need to contribute to the cost of field trips. These costs are often £300–£2000. You can take optional units in your final year that have no field trips.

If you take an optional placement unit or placement year, you’ll need to cover the costs of travel, accommodation and subsistence. These costs will vary depending on the duration and location of the placement. The cost will usually be £50–£1000.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – L700
  • our institution code – P80

 Apply now through UCAS

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

To start this course in 2025, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – L700
  • our institution code – P80

 Apply now through UCAS

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.