History student examines historical record. BA (Hons) History.

UCAS code

V100

Mode of Study

Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement

Duration

3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement

Start date

September 2023

Overview

Explore the past to understand the now. Dive into moments of chaos, challenge and change. Uncover evidence that shines new light on societies around the world. Across issues of gender, class, race, inequality and power, you’ll see how diverse people responded to the times they lived in – and how their actions still shape our world today. 

The city of Portsmouth is a time traveller's paradise where past and present collide: from historic warships to modern cruise liners, from Southsea Castle to the Spinnaker Tower. It's the ideal place to create your own immersive and relevant BA (Hons) History degree. 

The University of Portsmouth is ranked the number 1 modern university for research quality in Area Studies

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021

Read more about our excellent research in Area Studies

Course highlights

  • Study in a city that’s always been a gateway to the wider world, with options to explore the past of Britain, Europe, Africa, Asia and North America
  • Discover how to interpret a range of historical artefacts and sources, from the possessions of Tudor sailors to 1930s movie magazines
  • Get closer to history thanks to close links with Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, and the Portsmouth Museum and Records Service
  • Tailor your studies to times and themes you find most fascinating - from the British Civil Wars to the Opium War, from Victorian cities to modern Germany, from persecution and migration to anti-racism in the 20th century
  • Learn in a place where historians collaborate with linguists, sociologists and political scientists to answer deep and complex questions
  • Develop demonstrable skills in research, analysis and argument that are highly valued by all kinds of employers
  • Apply your new expertise in a CV-boosting work placement at a museum, heritage site, charity or other organisation of interest

91%

overall student satisfaction for our BA (Hons) History course

(NSS, 2022)

Entry requirements

BA (Hons) History degree entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points, to include A level History, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Focusing on your interests with pathways

You can follow optional sociology or politics pathways through this degree, or include it as a pathway in our English Literature, American Studies or International Relations courses. It'll lead to one of these awards at the end of the course:

Richard's story

"Portsmouth has definitely given me the tools I need to achieve..."

Find out what Richard loves about studying a BA (Hons) History degree at Portsmouth, and where he hopes this will take him next.

Richard: What I love about history at Portsmouth is the variety that the course offers, it just gives you the different aspects of History that you wouldn't necessarily be learning in school.

I hope to personally work in the civil service so I'd like to work in either regional or national government.

Portsmouth has definitely given me the tools I need to achieve it's given me the confidence and skills I can pass on when I'm going to my next career. 

Careers and opportunities

Employers in all kinds of industries value History graduates. This is because you’ll graduate with much-requested skills including:

  • analysing and managing large amounts of information 
  • carrying out research independently and as part of a team 
  • communicating a persuasive argument 
  • writing in a concise and informative way

What can you do with a History degree?

As a qualified historian, you can move forward to further study and research or put your degree to work in areas such as:

  • archives and information management
  • corporate governance
  • law
  • museums and the heritage sector
  • publishing and media
  • teaching

Graduate roles and destinations

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • archivist
  • barrister
  • development editor in publishing
  • museum curator
  • researcher and writer for TV
  • teacher

Portsmouth alumni have worked with organisations including:

  • central and local government
  • higher education providers
  • National Trust
  • Office for National Statistics
  • Serco
  • West Midlands Police

Hear from BA (Hons) History graduate, Emily

Emily Fryer graduated in 2018 with a BA (Hons) History degree from the University of Portsmouth. She is now a HR Manager. Find out what Emily’s role entails and how she’s applying the skills she learnt during her time with us.

Emily: I am Emily Fryer. I went to Portsmouth three years ago and I studied history.

I've always loved history, it's been my passion since I've been little. My dad loves history as well. We would always go on trips to the museum. We would go to the Imperial War Museum in London loads.

When I was sort of picking what I wanted to do at uni, I wasn't sure what I wanted to do for a career. History is a subject that I loved the most and then when I was speaking to the Careers Advisors, they were saying about how many transferable skills history has.

I visited three different universities and Portsmouth was by far my favourite. I think it helped when I visited, it was super sunny and Portsmouth in the sunshine is the loveliest place ever. You've got it all really. You have the student life, but you've also got the beach and all the history. It was just the place really more than anything else that sold me, like I would love to live here for three years.

All the lecturers that I met were so lovely, really passionate and they are all actively researching and publishing as well. So you really get experts in each of their fields. One of my lecturers was Rob James, I ended up getting a first overall, and I think that was largely down to him. Always knowing that I could do better and pushing me and really believing in me.

When I graduated with my history degree, I was kind of unsure about what to do, what career path to take because it is so varied, you can really do whatever you want. I found a job at Cath Kidston. I got a job in HR and it's just something that I've realised is a perfect mix of all of my skills, all of my passions, all into one job.

My degree has actually had a huge impact on my career. I wanted to learn all of the theory behind the stuff I've been doing at work for the last two years. That's why I was so keen to do my CIPD.

I don't even know where I'd be without the University of Portsmouth, it was such a big part of my life. Living here and studying here and all of the people that I met and the tutors. Kind of more than anything, it's instilled that thirst for knowledge and always wanting to know more and always wanting to question things. I think a huge part of history is you're always questioning a source, and the lecturers would say, don't just believe everything at face value, always question things and always want to know more. What really drives me is that I just want a job that I enjoy, a life that I enjoy. That is what makes me want to continue studying so I can just progress in my career and continue enjoying what I'm doing. 

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course. We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

We'll also be available to help, advise and support you for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Placement year (optional)

After your second year, you can undertake an optional work placement year. This is an exciting opportunity to get invaluable work experience relevant to your intended career path.

The University can provide support and advice to help secure a work placement best suited for you. You can find placements in the UK or beyond, depending on your identified career plans.

Placement destinations

History students undertake placements in a variety of areas. Current and recent students have worked in the not-for-profit sector, in museums and heritage sites, in digital content management and with legal firms.

We'll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You'll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

The history degree at Portsmouth has been very enjoyable and the city itself boasts a wealth of material that has been beneficial to my learning.

Connor Jones, BA (Hons) History student

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) History degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Core modules

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Describe and discuss key developments in modern European history.
  • Identify and analyse significant themes in the shaping of modern Europe.
  • Develop an appreciation of a range of historiographical views and approaches to the period.
  • Apply knowledge of specific examples to analyse historical developments within an appropriate historical and geographical context.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Describe and discuss key developments and themes across the period and assess their significance.
  • Develop an appreciation of a range of historiographical views and approaches to the period.
  • Analyse primary source material within its appropriate historical and geographical context.
  • Apply knowledge of specific examples to analyse historical developments within an appropriate historical and geographical context.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Explore the experiences of various individuals and groups of people within their historical context
  • Discuss the ways in which historians have investigated historical experiences through the study of individual lives and social groups
  • Identify different primary sources that have been used by historians to research historical lives.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Describe and discuss key developments in the history of these major regions of the world
  • Identify and analyse significant themes in the shaping of regional histories
  • Explore historiographical approaches to these regional histories.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
Module Learning Outcomes
  • Identify the essential skills for the university-level study of History
  • Demonstrate critical awareness of personal skills and qualities in relation to academic work: reading, synthesis, and writing
  • Develop confidence in working with peers
  • Proactively identify strategies for developing existing skills within the framework of the University's various support options.

Explore this module

Core modules

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Plan and undertake self-guided research.
  • Communicate their research findings in a way tailored to an intended audience.
  • Reflect on their strengths & weaknesses and identify routes to improve.
  • Produce a proposal for a viable dissertation/major project.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Assess the development of historiographical debates within their appropriate contexts.
  • Engage constructively regarding the significance of a diverse range of historical writing.
  • Write fluent and analytical responses on recent historical debates.
  • Present and discuss how historians have written about the past in an accessible way.

Explore this module

Optional modules

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources and appraise different aspects of censorship, state power and control.
  • Compare and critically reflect upon different notions of human control and agency and the various ways in which these operated in different locations under contrasting regimes.
  • Differentiate between the historiographical approaches towards notions of censorship, state power and control.
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively, in a range of different formats.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll explore conflicting interpretations of Nazism, focusing in particular on who held power in the ‘Third Reich’ as well as key policy areas. You will compare and contrast contentious interpretations by historians and explore why there have been major shifts in the debate since the end of World War II. You'll also address debates about the origins and nature of the Holocaust, as well as the impact of the Nazi period on German and international politics and society from 1945.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the rise of Nazism (fascism)
  • Analyze National Socialist ideologies and specific policies
  • Compare types of support for and dissent to Nazism
  • Debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Analyze the significance of the legacy of the ‘Third Reich’ on German politics and society from 1945 to the present
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures 
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
     
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours of independent study for this module. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module. 

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2.000 word essay (70% of final mark)
Additional content
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Explain the rise of Nazism
  • Analyze NS ideologies and specific policies
  • Compare types of support for and dissent to Nazism
  • Debate the contested origins and implementation of the Holocaust
  • Analyze the significance of the legacy of the “Third Reich” on German politics and society from 1945 to the present

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Explore various core topics in the history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World.
  • Evaluate the historiography of slavery and antislavery in the Atlantic world.
  • Critically examine the nature and basis of primary evidence.
  • Write effectively using appropriate academic norms and conventions.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources relating and appraise different aspects of the history of crime
  • Assess methods of social control used at different periods of time, and the extent to which these were challenged.
  • Differentiate between different historiographical approaches and arguments within the history of crime.
  • Review how legal records can be used as a primary source for the understanding of social history.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically assess key debates on the nature of Soviet society, politics and history and understand their context.
  • Assess and account for the nature and causes of change in Soviet society and politics.
  • Display a critical understanding of the complexities of the operation of Soviet politics and society over time.
  • Critically analyse the role played by different factors in Soviet politics and society – individuals, social, economic, ethnic and international.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 
What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Compare and contrast the ways in which different social groups have understood and experienced popular cultures over time.
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively, in a range of different formats.
  • Examine and evaluate differing historiographical views on popular culture across the period of the module.
  • Analyse a range of primary and secondary sources relating to popular cultures.

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Contextualise the European colonisation of Africa
  • Engage critically with justifications for colonial rule
  • Engage with contemporary debates regarding colonialism, decolonisation and its legacies in Europe and Africa
  • Critically analyse primary and secondary sources
  • Present a reasoned argument in written form, using appropriate terminology

Explore this module

What you'll learn
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically discuss a number of specific topics within the field of US foreign policy in the twentieth century and its emergence as a superpower.
  • Analyse key historical issues, concepts, evidence and historiographical debates in US foreign policy.
  • Critically analyse the role of the US as a hemispheric and world power.
  • Employ independent learning and research skills.

Explore this module

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Reflect on their learning and experience to date and use this as a basis to plan and organise suitable work experience(s) that will enable the development of their professional profile.
    • Propose a programme of learning that enables the development and demonstration of specified professional skills.
    • Critically evaluate their learning and experience and relate this to their future career goals.
    • Communicate the outcomes of their experience, through the effective use of reflective practice.

    Explore this module

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Explore debates about the use of material culture by historians.
    • Assess how the use of material culture might help to challenge older historical narratives.
    • Apply theoretical and methodological approaches to specific objects/artefacts.
    • Conduct focused reading and research on particular examples of material culture, and communicate findings effectively.

    Explore this module

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Explore the formation of national and ethnic identities through the case studies of postwar Britain and Germany.
    • Evaluate scholarly debates about national identites, ethnic identities and nationalism.
    • Apply theoretical and methodological approaches to a number of different case studies.
    • Conduct research through focused reading, examine primary sources, and communicate findings effectively.

    Explore this module

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Manage and complete tasks in a study relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance.
    • Critically reflect on the formal learning experience and student ambassadorial role for the University, and consider the relevance of this learning to future study and/or employability and personal development.
    • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your undergraduate course within the global context.

    Explore this module

    Optional modules

    What you'll do

    Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

    What you'll learn

    When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

    • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
    • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
    • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
    • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
    Teaching activities
    • 10 x 1-hour seminars
    • 1,125 hours on placement
    Assessment

    On this module, you'll be assessed through:

    • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
    Additional content
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Critically reflect on the competencies required within a placement environment.
    • Identify and evaluate the learning experience and the relevance of this learning to future careers and professional development, identifying areas for improvement or further training.
    • Self-evaluate their success in meeting the objectives identified in the learning agreement.

    Explore this module

    Core modules

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Analyse and critically evaluate various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history.
    • Undertake intensive critical work on primary sources relating to a strand of specialist history.
    • Construct and present arguments effectively and persuasively in a range of appropriate formats.
    You'll specialise in focused topics that most interest you. You'll take on four special themes (or two, if you're on a pathway course) from subjects such as these:
    • Britain in Revolution: the impact of the Civil Wars: 1637-1662
    • Cinema-going in Wartime Britain
    • Conflict, Conspiracy, Consensus? Religious Identities in Elizabethan England
    • Decolonisation in Africa
    • Europe in the American century
    • The French Revolution
    • The Imperial City: Popular Culture, Slums and Scandal in Britain 1870-1939
    • Magic and Modernity, 1780–1900
    • The Making of the German Nation
    • The Opium War, 1839-1842
    • Racism and Anti-Racism in Postwar Britain
    • Sex, Gender and Power in Early Modern England
    Explore this module
    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Analyse various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history.

    • Undertake intensive critically evaluation of primary sources relating to a strand of specialist history.

    • Construct and present arguments effectively and persuasively in a range of appropriate formats.

    You'll specialise in focused topics that most interest you. You'll take on four special themes (or two, if you're on a pathway course) from subjects such as these:
    • Britain in Revolution: the impact of the Civil Wars: 1637-1662
    • Cinema-going in Wartime Britain
    • Conflict, Conspiracy, Consensus? Religious Identities in Elizabethan England
    • Decolonisation in Africa
    • Europe in the American century
    • The French Revolution
    • The Imperial City: Popular Culture, Slums and Scandal in Britain 1870-1939
    • Magic and Modernity, 1780–1900
    • The Making of the German Nation
    • The Opium War, 1839-1842
    • Racism and Anti-Racism in Postwar Britain
    • Sex, Gender and Power in Early Modern England
    Explore this module
    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Analyse and assess the various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history.
    • Conduct intensive critical work on primary source documentation.
    • Explore the relationship between primary and secondary source materials.
    • Engage with the methodological and interpretive issues in the historiographical theme identified.
    • Individually or within a group context, build upon research already gleaned and construct a coherent presentation in the chosen subject area.
    • Demonstrate intellectual, transferable and employability skills appropriate to the field of history.
    You'll specialise in focused topics that most interest you. You'll take on four special themes (or two, if you're on a pathway course) from subjects such as these:
    • Britain in Revolution: the impact of the Civil Wars: 1637-1662
    • Cinema-going in Wartime Britain
    • Conflict, Conspiracy, Consensus? Religious Identities in Elizabethan England
    • Decolonisation in Africa
    • Europe in the American century
    • The French Revolution
    • The Imperial City: Popular Culture, Slums and Scandal in Britain 1870-1939
    • Magic and Modernity, 1780–1900
    • The Making of the German Nation
    • The Opium War, 1839-1842
    • Racism and Anti-Racism in Postwar Britain
    • Sex, Gender and Power in Early Modern England

    Explore this module

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Analyse and assess the various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history.
    • Conduct intensive critical work on primary source documentation.
    • Explore the relationship between primary and secondary source materials.
    • Engage with the methodological and interpretive issues in the historiographical theme identified.
    • Individually or within a group context, build upon research already gleaned and construct a coherent presentation in the chosen subject area.
    • Demonstrate intellectual, transferable and employability skills appropriate to the field of history.
    You'll specialise in focused topics that most interest you. You'll take on four special themes (or two, if you're on a pathway course) from subjects such as these:
    • Britain in Revolution: the impact of the Civil Wars: 1637-1662
    • Cinema-going in Wartime Britain
    • Conflict, Conspiracy, Consensus? Religious Identities in Elizabethan England
    • Decolonisation in Africa
    • Europe in the American century
    • The French Revolution
    • The Imperial City: Popular Culture, Slums and Scandal in Britain 1870-1939
    • Magic and Modernity, 1780–1900
    • The Making of the German Nation
    • The Opium War, 1839-1842
    • Racism and Anti-Racism in Postwar Britain
    • Sex, Gender and Power in Early Modern England

    Explore this module

    What you'll learn
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Design a viable dissertation/project proposal
    • Use current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
    • Deploy established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to history
    • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
    • Manage and reflect on your learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to the academic or workplace community

    Explore this module

    Optional modules

    What you'll do

    You'll get an understanding of sociological issues in an international setting, and enhance your job prospects.

    What you'll learn

    When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

    Manage and complete tasks relevant to your course while abroad, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance
    Critically reflect on your learning experience and ambassadorial role for the University
    Consider the relevance of your learning to future study and/or employability and personal development
    Critically assess how activities covered on your course relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice in a global context

    Teaching activities
    • 5 x 1-hour seminars
    • 1,195 hours studying abroad
    Assessment

    On this module, you'll be assessed through:

    a 3,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)
     

    Additional content
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Manage and complete tasks in a study relevant to their course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance.

    • Critically reflect on the formal learning experience and student ambassadorial role for the University, and consider the relevance of this learning to future study and/or employability and personal development.

    • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on the student's undergraduate course within the global context.

    Explore this module

    What you'll do

    Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

    What you'll learn

    When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

    • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
    • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
    • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
    • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
    Teaching activities
    • 10 x 1-hour seminars
    • 1,125 hours on placement
    Assessment

    On this module, you'll be assessed through:

    • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
    Additional content
    The learning outcomes of this module are:
    • Critically reflect on the competencies required within a placement environment.
    • Identify and evaluate the learning experience and the relevance of this learning to future careers and professional development, identifying areas for improvement or further training.
    • Self-evaluate their success in meeting the objectives identified in the learning agreement.

    Explore this module

    Changes to course content

    We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

    Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.


    How you're assessed

    You’ll be assessed through a variety of formats. The emphasis is on giving you a range of ways to demonstrate what you’ve learned and how your thinking has developed.

    Your history degree with us is weighted more towards coursework than traditional exams. Assessment types include:

    • blogs
    • essays
    • project reports
    • group presentations
    • individual presentations
    • in-class contributions
    • a dissertation

    You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

    You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so that you can continue to develop and improve

    Teaching

    Teaching methods on this course include:

    • lectures
    • workshops
    • seminars
    • one-on-one tutorials

    There's an emphasis on learning the skills to conduct your own research, follow your own initiative, and confidently present your ideas.

    You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

    For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

    I love the direct learning offered. It relates so well to teaching and the lecturers have so much experience.

    Jessica Jenkins, BA (Hons) History Student

    How you'll spend your time

    One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

    We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

    A typical week

    We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your History degree.

    In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, independent reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course.

    You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

    Term dates

    The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

    See term dates

    Supporting your learning

    The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

    Types of support

    Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to postgraduate study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your Master's.

    As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

    You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

    They can help with:

    • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
    • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
    • Understanding and using assignment feedback
    • Managing your time and workload
    • Revision and exam techniques

    As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

    ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

    • Academic writing
    • Note taking
    • Time management
    • Critical thinking
    • Presentation skills
    • Referencing
    • Working in groups
    • Revision, memory and exam techniques

    If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

    Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

    You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

    If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

    They'll help you to

    • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
    • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
    • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
    • liaise with external services

    Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

    The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

    If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

    Course costs and funding

    Tuition fees

    • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
    • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
    • International students – £17,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

    You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

    Funding your studies

    Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

    Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

    Additional course costs

    These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

    Additional costs

    Our accommodation section show your accommodation options and highlight how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

    You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

    You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

    We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

     

    If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

    You’ll need to cover additional costs, such as travel costs, if you take an optional placement or placement abroad.

    These costs will vary depending on the location and duration of the placement, and can range from £50–£1000.

    During your placement year or study abroad year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, this discount amounts to 90% of the year’s fees.

    Tuition fees for that year are:

    • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
    • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
    • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

    The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

    Apply

    How to apply

    To start this course in 2023, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

    • the UCAS course code – V100
    • our institution code – P80

    If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

    You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

    • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
    • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
    • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

    If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

    How to apply from outside the UK

    See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

    To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

    If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

    Admissions terms and conditions

    When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.