Broken marble statue head

Psychology BSc (Hons)

Start your path towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist on this British Psychological Society (BPS) accredited degree. Use specialist psychology facilities such as motion capture, thermal camera and eye tracking technology.

University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

C800

Accreditation:

This course is Accredited

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points from 3 A levels, or equivalent

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

Psychology can change lives for the better.

On this BSc (Hons) Psychology degree, which is accredited by the British Psychological Society (BPS), you’ll study the mind and behaviour, examine how people think, act and feel – and take your first steps towards a career that really matters.

Psychology at the University of Portsmouth is ranked 5th of the modern universities for research quality

Research Excellence Framework (REF) 2021

Read more about our excellent psychology research

Course highlights

  • Access specialist psychology equipment and facilities including an observation suite, toddler and infant laboratory, psychophysiology laboratory, and digital analysis and video editing suite
  • Have the chance to study abroad or take part in a year-long work placement, boosting your employability prospects after the course
  • Create your own bespoke final year by choosing the subjects and specialisms that most interest you from a fully optional module list
  • Be inspired by regular one-on-one tutorials with experienced psychology practitioners involved in trailblazing research, including the Centre for Comparative and Evolutionary Psychology and the Dog Cognition Centre
  • Become eligible to apply for graduate membership of the British Psychological Society (with a 2:2 or higher)

92%

of graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course

(HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/19)

Accredited by:

This degree offers eligibility for Graduate Basis for Chartered Membership (GBC) of the British Psychological Society (BPS), if you graduate with a 2:2 or higher.

Psychology students Sara, Pamela and Zoe on their experiences of the course

Psychology BSc students Sara, Pamela and Zoe talk about their experiences on the course at the University of Portsmouth and how it has benefitted them personally and professionally.

Zoe: My favourite thing about my degree is definitely the opportunities that I've been given. I've been fortunate enough to take part in three placements in mental health within HR, some marketing experience. I've really been able to broaden my depth into gaining a deeper understanding and even if that's not what I want to do in the future, I've still been able to gain valuable skills.

Pamela: I think the most exciting thing was just me being able to take part in experiments and studies. I remember one study which I had to put my hand in some water. It was just there to measure my stress levels.

There was so much more out there than just the research and the data analysis. There was actually that opportunity for you to be able to learn more about yourself as an individual and how you are able to sort of be developed in this society, in this culture, and just making me feel as if I can contribute something, no matter how small or big it is.

Sara: The facilities here are kept very up to date. We have rooms for interviews. So people that take part in studies, students or just public, they're very isolated rooms that are soundproof as well. 

Virtual reality, that was kind of interesting because that was kind of emerging a few years ago, so that was really interesting to see people studying that. We also have a technology room. So EEG, where people want to see brain activity during an interview, kind of like lie detection mainly.

Pamela: There's a lot of facilities here that are able to add to your understanding of psychology and the stuff that you want to do in the future as well.

Zoe: For someone who's thinking about studying psychology at the University of Portsmouth, I couldn't recommend it enough.

Sara: I would say go for it. It's been such an amazing experience. If I could do it all again, I would.

Pamela: Be open to all the opportunities that are given to you. Don't be afraid to come to Portsmouth - it's a lovely city.

Zoe: Going into university, it's a scary transition whether you're from A-levels college or whatever it may be, or older. The University of Portsmouth really just helps you ease into that. The amount of support you get, I think honestly, they really just put you at the forefront of trying to help you get the most out of your degree.

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Entry requirements

Psychology degree entry requirements

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points from 3 A levels, or equivalent. (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 29

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English Language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Facilities and specialist equipment

These are just a few of the facilities you'll use during your psychology degree, plus you'll get priority booking during term time.

Person performing a test using an EEG

Psychophysiology laboratory

Record and analyse physical responses, such as electrical activity in the brain, neural processes, blood pressure and heart rate, to explore how the body reacts to different psychological states.

Person using eye tracking software

Eye tracking technology

Discover how eye movement can be tracked and analysed to measure spatial attention, and used to study areas such as face recognition and change blindness.

University of Portsmouth student playing around with thermal imaging on a computer

Thermal cameras

Learn how thermal camera technology can be used to read physiological activity in the face and reveal signs of deception.

See our psychology facilities and equipment in action

Take a tour of King Henry Building at the University of Portsmouth and the specialist psychology equipment and facilities we use in our Psychology BSc and Forensic Psychology BSc courses.

Video showing the specialist psychology equipment and facilities we use in our Psychology BSc and Forensic Psychology BSc courses at the University of Portsmouth: interview room, thermal camera, eye tracking, psycho-physiology lab, and more. 

I’ve never felt so supported as I was at Portsmouth, and the opportunities I’ve had through researching and professional development are amazing.

Oakley Cheung, Psychologist, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Careers and opportunities

When you graduate, you’ll be ready to continue your training to become a Chartered Psychologist (CPsychol).

On the course, you'll be able to customise your final year to your own preferred field of study and choose modules that lay the groundwork for a professional specialism, including sport psychology, educational psychology, and clinical and health psychology.

After completing your BSc (Hons) Psychology, the next step towards becoming a Chartered Psychologist would be a Masters in your chosen specialism, such as MSc Forensic Psychology, MSc Health Psychology or MSc Sport and Exercise Psychology.

Or, if there's another sector you'd rather go into, you'll also have what you need to take on roles in health associated professions, marketing, and education – to name just a few. 

According to the British Psychological Society, more than 750,000 people in the UK work in an area that involves psychology as part of their role, so you'll have lots of options when you finish the course.

Why study psychology?

A psychology degree will set you on the path to becoming a psychologist, but there are also many other careers it can lead to. Learn more about why psychology is such a fascinating and valuable subject to study.
Students collaborating
Read our blog

What can you do with a psychology degree?

As a Chartered Psychologist, areas you could specialise in include:

  • clinical psychology
  • sports psychology
  • counselling psychology
  • educational psychology
  • forensic psychology
  • occupational psychology

The transferable skills you'll learn are also in demand in other fields, such as:

  • teaching (with additional training)
  • social welfare
  • police work
  • research
  • marketing

Graduate roles and destinations

Roles our previous graduates have gone on to work in, include:

  • assistant psychologist
  • lecturer in policing
  • domestic abuse worker
  • wellbeing lead
  • occupational therapy support officer
  • head of learning and professional development
  • HR director
  • National Crime Agency (NCA) officer

They've gone on to work in the following organisations:

  • Mind
  • Care UK
  • Department of Health and Social Care
  • Ministry of Defence
  • The Home Office
  • Office for National Statistics
  • Metropolitan Police
  • EMEA at Michael Kors
Female student at computer

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Placement year

You'll be able to increase your chances of landing your ideal job after your degree by taking an optional work placement year after your second or third year. A placement year gives you the opportunity to apply your knowledge in a real workplace, boosting your employability and making you stand out to employers after the course. 

You can work for a company or organisation here in the UK or overseas, or you could go independent by setting up and running your own business with other students.

Whichever route you choose, you'll receive support and guidance. Our specialist team of Science and Health Careers advisors can help you with finding a work placement and improving your employability skills. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search – including help with applications and interviews – and support throughout your placement year.

I loved the option to take a sandwich year placement. I wasn’t 100% sure on the career I wanted to do but was interested in mental health and the NHS. Portsmouth offered the best opportunities for work experience in my desired field.

Oakley Cheung, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Potential roles

Roles previous students have taken on during their placement years include:

  • assistant psychologist
  • assistant occupational psychologist
  • business operations assistant
  • student clinical psychologist
  • student psychologist
  • student researcher

Potential destinations

Previous students have completed placements in the following organisations:

  • Great Ormond Street Hospital
  • Mind
  • Solent NHS Trust
  • GlaxoSmithKline
  • Microsoft
  • IBM

Study abroad

You’ll also have the chance to study abroad at one of our partner universities in Europe or Asia, which is a fantastic opportunity to explore a new destination and experience the world as an international student.

Many of our students describe their time spent studying overseas as truly life-changing, as well as an excellent way to stand out to future employers. 

 

Hear from Dr Lucy Akehurst, Head of the Department of Psychology

Dr Lucy Akehurst, Head of Department of Psychology, talks about the exciting facilities available to current and future students.

Dr Lucy Akehurst: When our first year undergraduate students arrive at the Department of Psychology, I think they feel part of the community straight away.

We pride ourselves on our tutorial system at the University of Portsmouth. Staff are working with students from the word go.

We have a number of laboratory facilities and each of them house specialist equipment. We've got a baby and infant lab. We have a suite of labs, there's observation facilities, one way mirrors and recording equipment. We also have a Psychophysiology lab which has an EEG machine and eye tracking. We also have a motion capture laboratory. We have special cameras that pick up the sensors that the students have placed on their participants just to see how the human body moves when we perform particular actions.

The nice thing about coming to Portsmouth is that undergraduate students from the word go have access to those facilities.

Modules

The psychology degree topics on this course are taught in modules, and each module is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, four modules worth 20 credits and one module worth 40 credits.

What you'll study

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and contrast key findings from the literature in animal behaviour.

  • Explain different methods and theoretical approaches used in animal behaviour.

  • Outline and assess how evolutionary theory can be applied to human behaviour.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Present quantitative data linked to a specific research question in an appropriate format which adheres to recognised scientific conventions.

  • Utilise appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics to summarise and analyse empirical data linked to a specific research question.

  • Outline some basic concepts and theoretical underpinnings in the collection and analysis of qualitative data.

  • Identify and differentiate between different research approaches and designs.

  • Perform a selection of quantitative and qualitative analyses on appropriate data.

  • Identify key ethical issues in psychological research and apply appropriate ethical codes of conduct to research studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, retrieve and review information from academic sources of evidence (e.g. books, journal articles and appropriate internet sources) using recognised referencing guidelines.

  • Summarise and compare different examples of psychological research, using evidence to support scientific judgements and conclusions.

  • Work independently, manage a detailed project and be self-reliant, communicating ideas in written form clearly and concisely.

  • Reflect on their learning experience and activities completed during the module to support more detailed explanation of topics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the basic principles of the scientific method as they relate to psychology.

  • Outline key concepts and schools of thought that have shaped the history of psychological research.

  • Describe and contrast the methods and theoretical approaches used by different fields of psychology.

  • Apply multiple perspectives to current debates and issues in psychology.

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify structures and functions of the human nervous system that are relevant to the study of psychology.

  • Identify the role of physiology in human behaviour, emotion, and cognition.

  • Appraise different research methods and techniques used in biological and cognitive psychology.

  • Identify and evaluate the relationship between theory and method in contemporary biological and cognitive psychology research.

  • Appraise seminal experiments in the development of biological and cognitive psychology.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe, compare and contrast different classical theories of personality or intelligence.

  • Critically discuss individual differences in the context of personality or intelligence.

  • Competently administer a psychometric test.

  • Create derived scores for psychometric test results with reference to relevant norms.

  • Interpret psychometric test scores and provide appropriate candidate feedback.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise career opportunities open to psychology graduates and understand the skills, qualities and experience those career areas require.

  • Examine one's own career-related skills, interests, motivations and experience and recognise where these may need to develop further in order to achieve personal career goals.

  • Identify and appraise the requirements and nature of at least one type of work in which the student is interested, through research and/or practical experience of the application of work in that career area.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Prepare a research proposal for a planned independent research study that considers practical, ethical and resource issues and develops an effective study rationale.

  • Devise, prepare and conduct quantitative research investigations by utilising testable research hypotheses and selecting appropriate methodologies.

  • Apply advanced statistical analyses in order to interpret, reason, and write about, quantitative research data effectively using accepted scientific conventions.

  • Manage complex qualitative research data; applying suitable analysis techniques and developing appropriate interpretations of empirical findings.

  • Evaluate the choice of analyses employed and consider their implications for the interpretation of qualitative research findings.

  • Present and critically discuss empirical findings in the context of previous psychological research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan and construct a psychological measurement scale by applying basic scale construction and research design principles and utilising findings from previous psychological literature.

  • Distinguish between theoretical concepts in psychological scale construction including different forms of reliability and validity, and be able to assess these properties from acquired behavioural data.

  • Perform and interpret analyses using statistical software (SPSS) for a range of descriptive, graphical and inferential analysis techniques drawing appropriate conclusions.

  • Justify the choice of appropriate statistical tests for common experimental and correlational designs in psychology.

  • Analyse and present research data from simple and factorial experimental designs.

  • Appraise the results of psychological research studies presenting findings in accordance with accepted scientific conventions.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine findings from social and developmental psychology; synthesising and applying these in analytic, imaginative, and creative ways.

  • Evaluate theoretical and methodological issues in social psychology and in developmental psychology.

  • Appraise the relevance and application of social and developmental psychology to everyday situations, problems, and practice.

Optional modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret key concepts and principles underpinning the application of sport and exercise psychology.

  • Conduct qualitative data collection, preparation, and analysis in a rigorous manner demonstrating a critical awareness of key ethical and methodological considerations.

  • Critically discuss data derived from qualitative methods in relation to key social and developmental topics facing sport and exercise psychology practitioners.

  • Critically evaluate key techniques and strategies aimed at improving athlete, team, and coach performance in sport.

  • Synthesise information from a variety of sources to produce appropriate evidence-based recommendations to improve client performance demonstrating clear analytical ability.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and consider aspects of human and nonhuman animal behaviours that have been shaped by evolutionary processes.

  • Critically assess relevant theory and research findings in comparative and evolutionary psychology.

  • Critically evaluate different approaches to the study of behaviour, cognition and emotion within a comparative and an evolutionary perspective and compared to other disciplines.

  • Present a reasoned argument that integrates knowledge from comparative and evolutionary perspectives as well as other scientific disciplines.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and reflect on the influence of culture on psychology.

  • Outline and systematically evaluate selected topics in cultural psychology.

  • Critically assess relevant theory and research findings in cultural psychology.

  • Critically evaluate different methodological approaches in studying the influence of culture on psychological phenomena.

  • Be familiar with issues surrounding the nature of culture.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss different practices in a range of educational settings in light of relevant research and theory.

  • Determine the relevance of psychological theory and findings to contemporary issues within educational contexts.

  • Describe and critically explore examples of psychological research on specified topics in educational psychology evaluating the method scope and utility of research findings.

  • Reflect on the history, concepts and practice of educational psychology and the role of the educational psychologist in supporting learning and development.

  • Explore whether an educational practice has the potential to impact learning and development.

Additional content
 
 

What you'll learn

The learning outcomes of this module are to be confirmed.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop a critical understanding of the big issues and contemporary debates in education and teaching.
  • Analyse and apply the fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to the planning and evaluation of a lesson plan.
  • Understand the importance of safeguarding children.
  • Critically reflect on current developments in teaching and learning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Distinguish between specified psychological approaches and methodologies used in the study of both psychological distress and physical health with respect to their strengths, limitations and suitability.

  • Apply theory and research findings appropriately to applied topics and problems in clinical and health psychology.

  • Outline and critically evaluate approaches to clinical and health psychology.

  • Explain how biopsychosocial factors are implicated in health conditions, both physical and mental health.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and evaluate existing theories of communication and language.

  • Critically examine theories and research on the relationship between culture and communicative practices, with reference to different contexts and settings as well as individual differences and language disabilities.

  • Apply different methods of investigation of communicative phenomena and generate ideas and solutions to describe these.

  • Identify and systematically assess different verbal and non-verbal interactional modalities and strategies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Provide a detailed appraisal of the structures and functions of the human nervous system that are relevant to the study of psychology.

  • Systematically examine and compare the main methods used in modern neuroscience, with emphasis on their strengths, weaknesses, possibilities and limitations.

  • Explain and critically evaluate clinical and non-clinical applications of neuroscience with reference to related research and theory.

  • Describe and critically evaluate fundamental domains of interest within the neuroscience field, including current and emerging areas of interest and also historical debates.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the contribution made by psychological theory and research to improve our understanding of occupational and organisational contexts, and work-related behaviours, practices and policies.

  • Appraise the strengths and weaknesses of the different approaches, strategies and methodologies used by psychologists and practitioners to understand or influence different occupational or organisational settings.

  • Assess the diversity of psychological functioning as this applies to occupational and organsiational settings, and the role played by individual differences in affecting work-related attitudes and behaviours.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the major theoretical frameworks and research methodologies used in forensic psychology.

  • Critically evaluate the contribution of forensic psychology to real world practice.

  • Synthesise the literature across the several disparate research areas that forensic psychology draws upon.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Formulate and apply an appropriate and informed psychological research question(s) and rationale.

  • Critically evaluate existing academic literature in the chosen topic area and conduct an independent empirical study that is informed by this evaluation.

  • Identify key ethical issues in psychological research and apply an appropriate ethical code to their own study.

  • Report findings using appropriate psychological terminology and recognised psychological report writing conventions.

  • Analyse and critically reflect on the findings and their implications in a written report.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Formulate and apply an appropriate and informed psychological research question(s) and rationale.

  • Critically evaluate existing academic literature in the chosen topic area and conduct an independent empirical study that is informed by this evaluation.

  • Identify key ethical issues in psychological research and apply an appropriate ethical code to their own study.

  • Report findings using appropriate psychological terminology and recognised psychological report writing conventions.

  • Analyse and critically reflect on the findings and their implications in a written report.

  • Justify and critically reflect on their study rationale and its scientific contribution, the adopted methodology, and the personal skills gained through their research in an oral interview.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to manage and complete tasks in a work area relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative and independence.

  • Critically evaluate how placement activities relate to relevant psychological theory, research and practice covered on your course

  • Apply what has been learned on your course and how that may be used in work procedures and environments.

  • Critically reflect on the workplace learning experience and the relevance of this learning to future personal development, identifying areas for improvement or further training.

  • Demonstrate a systematic recording of experiences and training gained on placement and produce evidence to support the acquisition of knowledge and practical competencies, and the application of relevant psychological skills as outlined in the HCPC Standards of Proficiency.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the constructionist perspective of the social psychology of disability.

  • Compare and contrast competing paradigms of disability such as the medical and social models of disability.

  • Critically examine the production of disability knowledge and practices.

  • Engage in an ethnographic disability research exercise.

  • Critically evaluate a disability research report and other texts.

Optional modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and demonstrate skills developed through overseas study (e.g. personal autonomy and accountability, language and/or interpersonal communication, time management and planning, assessment and analytical skills).

  • Demonstrate the ability to manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance.

  • Evaluate how the study placement learning relates to knowledge and practice covered on your course, and/or broader global or international psychological perspectives.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and demonstrate skills developed in the workplace (e.g. professional autonomy and accountability, language and/or interpersonal communication, time management and planning, assessment and analytical skills – while evaluating the impact of your actions).

  • Demonstrate the ability to manage and complete tasks in a business/work environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance.

  • Identify and reflect on the learning experience and the relevance of this learning to future employability and personal development, identifying areas for improvement or further training.

  • Evaluate how work placement activities relate to knowledge and practice covered on your course, and/or broader perspectives on the world of work.

What you'll learn

The learning outcomes of this module are to be confirmed.

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • written examinations
  • practical reports and essays
  • poster presentations
  • oral presentations
  • self-led research project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • small focussed seminars
  • one-to-one tutorials
  • practical research and experiments

The teaching is based on current research and professional practice to make sure what you learn is up to date.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

I like that the lecturers are not afraid to introduce to you controversial debates and ideas which deepen your knowledge and understanding of key ideas.

Amelia Woodard, BSc (Hons) Psychology

Teaching staff profiles

These are 2 of the expert staff who'll teach you on this course:

Dr Zarah Vernham, Undergraduate Psychology Programmes Lead

I'm the Undergraduate Programmes Lead for the BSc (Hons) Psychology and BSc (Hons) Forensic Psychology degrees. I lead a Level 6 (year 3) module called Cybercrime, Policing, and Security and teach on other modules such as the Psychology of Offending Behaviour and Research Methods and Data Analysis modules.

I'm the Deputy Director of the International Centre for Research in Forensic Psychology (ICRFP). My main research interests are in the areas of investigative interviewing, deception detection, offender behaviours and cognitions, and mental health.

Dr Roger Moore, Associate Head (Students)

I lead a Level 6 (year 3) module called Neuroscience and also teach on the Level 4 (year 1) Applying Psychological Research Methods module. My research interests are centred around experimental neuroscience. This involves investigation into the relationship between central nervous system (CNS) activity and personality and between CNS activity and movement. 

I studied my first degree in Psychology here at the University of Portsmouth over 25 years ago and I consider myself very lucky to still be based in the Psychology Department at Portsmouth.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, seminars and practical classes and workshops for about 10 hours a week. You'll have personal tutorials built into your modules, with weekly meetings in your first year and fortnightly meetings in the second year.

The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

The Maths Café offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK, Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students - £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £19,200 a year (may be subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – C800
  • our institution code – P80

 Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.