English Language and Linguistics students discuss their work
UCAS Code
QQ31
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2021, September 2022

See how you'll be taught in 2021/22 in our Covid information for applicants.

Apply through Clearing

To start this course in 2021 complete this short form, call us on +44 (0)23 9284 8074 or go to our Clearing section to chat with us online.

Our Clearing hotline is open 10.00am–4.30pm Monday to Thursday and 10.00am–4.00pm on Fridays.

Overview

Build on your interest in the English language and explore it from every angle on this BA (Hons) English Language and Linguistics degree.

You'll discover how language works in literature and digital communication, examine forensic linguistics and learn how people use the English language across the world.

The study of English language and linguistics sets you up for a career where your communication, creativity, management and critical thinking skills will shine. You could work in areas such as publishing, teaching, advertising and marketing.

100% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2020)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

95% Graduates in work or further study (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey conducted in 2019)

Entry requirements​

Entry requirements

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BCC
  • UCAS points – 104–120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, to include English Language or Literature (calculate your UCAS points)
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BCC
  • UCAS points – 104–120 points, to include A level English Language or Literature, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What you'll experience

On this course you'll:

  • Explore English language in social media, TV, advertising and professional contexts
  • Learn how English relates to issues such as gender, education, forensics, and globalisation
  • Develop your powers of analysis, criticism, argument, and problem solving
  • Develop transferable skills in communication, research, time management, and team working
  • Use corpora, databases and other digital tools to analyse texts
  • Choose options in year 2 and 3 to suit your interests and career ambitions
  • Enhance your qualifications with the Trinity College London Certificate – an internationally recognised qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). (This option is subject to an additional entry test and interview) 

Optional pathways

Interested in pairing English language and linguistics with English literature? Expand your degree with an optional pathway into another subject. It'll lead to this award at the end of the course:

My course provided a range of modules that allowed me to tailor my degree to the things I was passionate about for a potential career. All of the staff are incredibly passionate about their field, which is so encouraging.

Bethany Farmer, BA Hons English Language and Linguistics student

Careers and opportunities

After the course, you can use the communication and professional skills you've learnt across various roles in the private and public sectors. Fields you could work in include:

  • advertising
  • education
  • communication
  • media
  • marketing
  • publishing
  • technical writing
  • teaching English

You could also go onto to do postgraduate study in areas such as speech therapy, communication studies and marketing

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course. We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your CV.

We'll also be available to help, advise and support you for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional paid work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience.

Examples of previous placements include:

  • 7 Stars – a media company in London
  • Jet – a teaching English programme in Japan

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

I enjoyed the range of units that my course offered. My favourite unit was forensic linguistics, as this was something I had never covered before.

Lyncia Mande, BA Hons English Language and Linguistics student

What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll choose one of four texts from politics, contemporary culture, sport, the media and press, or contemporary literature to be the focus of your portfolio project. This immediate practical application of analytical knowledge and techniques promotes a critical and reflective knowledge and understanding of language, empowering you to question its principles, practices and boundaries.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and classify morphological elements, combinations and processes, and find and describe them and their possible causes and effects in an English language text
  • Identify and classify lexical and semantic features and relations, and find and describe them and their possible causes and effects in an English language text
  • Identify and classify syntactic units, features and relations, and find and describe them and their possible causes and effects in an English language text
  • Identify and classify phonetic and phonological features and relations, and find and describe them and their possible causes and effects in an English language text, carrying out a short phonemic transcription
  • Apply phonemic, morphological, semantic/lexical and syntactic knowledge to the analysis of a spoken English language text, its features and effects
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework portfolio (60% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll analyse syntactic, lexical, functional and phonological elements of English, from which you’ll develop a basic understanding of pedagogic grammar. You’ll also learn a previously unknown language and reflect on this experience, as well as make contrasts between this language and known languages.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and describe language teaching strategies and approaches, providing a basic rationale for their uses
  • Identify the main classifications and functions of grammatical and lexical description as applied to English
  • Reflect on your experience of learning an unknown foreign language and make contrasts and comparisons between the that language and English
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 2-hour seminars
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,000-word coursework projects (30% of final mark, each)
  • a 1,200-word coursework project (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine language change, regional and social variations, and language and gender as well as some of the issues involved in forensic linguistics. You’ll explore the relationship between language and the mind, considering it through an examination of how first and second languages are acquired and by looking at the ways language is processed and remembered.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify various functions of language and the different uses of language for different purposes
  • Reflect on and describe relationships between the individual, groups, society and language
  • Identify linguistic variation in relation to factors such as geographical region, social class, ethnicity, gender and nation
  • Describe aspects of the relationship between language and mind/thought
  • Explain how first and second languages are acquired, produced and comprehended
  • Collect relevant information from external sources and present your findings on the relevance of aspects of linguistics in a wider context
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark) – computerised

What you'll do

You’ll carry out a small-scale investigation into aspects of contemporary spoken language and work collaboratively to carry out research and present your findings in an oral presentation. In addition to writing an individual report, you’ll critically reflect on the process of carrying out research and how the skills you gained could be used in a professional context.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess your own learning needs and develop strategies for addressing weaknesses in learning
  • Read and organise points to form a coherent and cohesive argument on a discipline-related topic
  • Collect and analyse short extracts of authentic spoken data
  • Report collaboratively on the findings of your research project in a group presentation
  • Critically reflect on the process of carrying out research, working collaboratively and the role of research in potential careers
  • Produce a written report of the findings including potential modifications as well as reference to existing research
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 17 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word portfolio project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at how texts vary according to the context of situation, and how they employ multimodality to present their meaning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and describe features of texture in written and spoken texts
  • Record and transcribe spoken interactions using appropriate notation conventions
  • Understand relevant Conservation Analysis concepts and terms, and be able to apply them successfully to texts
  • Draw reasonable conclusions about social interactions based on an analysis of communicative features
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 750-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (40% of final mark)

Year 2

Core Modules

What you'll do

You’ll learn how to analyse texts by examining the ways that patterns of language are associated with social activities. You’ll also learn to see texts and language use as products of choices to be made on how to write/say something rather than simply what to write/say.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and evidence patterns of language forms
  • Discuss the relationship between patterns of language forms and social activities
  • Analyse a variety of texts in relation to the social activities of which they are a part
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine and critically reflect on the discrimination and creation of meaning in English from semantic and pragmatic perspectives.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss and elaborate on the various 'meanings' of text in formal semantic terms at both the lexical and propositional level
  • Discuss the use of language and the interpretation of hearers/readers in spoken and written texts in pragmatic terms
  • Analyse the discourse structure of written and spoken text in semantic and pragmatic terms
  • Provide reflective analyses of semantic and pragmatic concepts
  • Give an oral presentation on specific aspects of sematics and pragamatics
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll also examine issues relevant to different news media. Issues include ideology in the print press and changing news practitioner relationships.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine current issues relative to traditional (i.e. print and/or broadcast) media
  • Empirically analyse media texts in terms of ideological representation
  • Identify and justify the selection of appropriate media texts and appropriate analytical frameworks in the formulation of a short empirical research project
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 1-hour extra activities
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 6–8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word analytical report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll build on the knowledge of morphology, syntax and phonology gained in your first year and apply this to real-world examples.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify different speech disorders and how they are caused
  • Recognise different types of speech impairment
  • Describe a sample of clinical language data in terms of its grammatical structure
  • Analyse different theories of language impairment
  • Apply knowledge of language impairment theories to clinical language data
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll read them in historical and theoretical contexts and raise questions about the formation and definition of popular genres, the interaction of text and reader, and the politics of popular writings. You’ll scrutinise the ways in which popular fiction constructs identity, law and the deviant, combined with its fostering of intellectual curiosity, and independent and critical thought.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify key concerns addressed in crime and detective literatures
  • Analyse literary texts within the crime genre
  • Apply different theoretical approaches to a defined problem within crime and detective literatures
  • Conduct targeted independent research that results in a critical literary analysis of crime and detective literatures, demonstrating awareness of relevant theoretical approaches
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll work as part of an international team, communicating your findings in writing and through a web page.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Assess key theories in intercultural communication research
  • Collect data/information and analyse it from an intercultural perspective
  • Research a certain aspect of culture and communication 
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework report (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework assignment (40% of final mark) – group website project
  • a 1,500-word written coursework assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how core cultural theories can inform managers and professionals in their leadership styles and assist them in the development of appropriate management strategies. You'll also look at ways that groups function in different cultural and management contexts, and the implications of this for the management of people.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Comment with critical awareness on management and leadership in the global workplace
  • Identify and evaluate a number of different cross-cultural perspectives on the management of organisations and people
  • Critically analyse chosen aspects of processes and systems for the management of people in different professional cultural contexts
  • Write a professional report, with reference to relevant theory, which identifies management challenges and possible solutions in a specific cross-cultural workplace
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lecures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You’ll study the thinking and research of core contributing fields in language, language learning, and psychology to inform and develop reflection on your own experiences, interests and needs such as language learning, language teaching, communication, or psychology, and to further your own personal employability profile. You’ll study core texts about a central issue in SLA studies and design and present a research study to examine it and present it in a literature review and an academic poster.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, then compare the differences between and implications of, different theoretical, methodological, and philosophical approaches to the study of second language acquisition
  • Address, in depth and detail, at least one central issue in second language acquisition research such as grammar, pronunciation, critical period/s, implicit & explicit learning, social learning, and nativism
  • Choose, describe, and justify an appropriate research design to address a central issue in SLA studies
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (70% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework project (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll use these concepts to analyse samples of spoken and written English, and interview learners of English to study their language background and their current linguistic ability. You’ll develop methods and practice of language teaching by examining English language teaching (ELT) methodologies and their practical application when planning a variety of skills, grammar and function based lessons.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse samples of spoken and written English, taking into account such factors as grammar, lexis, discourse features and context of production
  • Analyse samples of spoken English at the segmental and suprasegmental level
  • Make contrasts and comparisons between English and other languages
  • Compare and contrast the learning and motivational needs of various types of language learner
  • Critically evaluate how English for speakers of other language (ESOL) methodologies impact on the practical aspects of lesson planning and exploitation of material (pedagogy)
Teaching activities
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 18 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (15% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (35% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

Key areas include the notions of literariness and foregrounding, the use of literary features, narrative structure, and the concept of metaphor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and describe features of 'literariness' in a range of texts
  • Critically discuss such features and how they contribute to the style of texts
  • Identify, describe and discuss the use of metaphor in literary and non-literary texts
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework portfolio (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

This qualification is recognised by the British Council and gives you the skills to teach in language schools worldwide. To be accepted on the Trinity programme you’ll need to pass all artefacts of language, learning & teaching and a selection interview and test of competence. To choose this module, you need to take the Language, Learning and Teaching module in year one and the TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) module in the same year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify different methods and approaches to the teaching of languages, in particular English as a second or other language (ESOL)
  • Design a series of lesson plans for an ESOL class based on published and own materials
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of materials and make simple adaptations to such materials for use in a defined context
  • Teach a series of ESOL lessons effectively
  • Critically reflect on your own performance as a trainee teacher and draw up action plans for future professional development
  • Elaborate a series of recommendations for the learner profiled in TESOL including grammar and phonology
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 146 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 6-hour practical skills assessment (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
  • a 3,500-word written assignment (100% of final mark)

Optional sandwich year

Optional modules

What you'll do

Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
  • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
  • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
  • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1,125 hours on placement
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll submit a proposal which will include an outline literature review, an ethical review and an annotated dissertation contents page that will identify how you intend to define, progress, enquire into and communicate the topic.

To complete your dissertation/major project, you’ll have access to a comprehensive online repository of general and guidance materials.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a suitable dissertation/project proposal
  • Use current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Use established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the subject
  • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (that may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your own learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to either the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of project supervision
  • 6 hours of workshop
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 384 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 9,000-word dissertation (90% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll plan a series of lessons with creative activities using music, literature, drama, film, storytelling and games. You’ll examine wider contexts and make professional judgements about planning beyond individual lessons, and while examples you come across in class will relate to the teaching of English, you could us the same principles and techniques for teaching other languages.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the potential of creative texts/activities for developing language learning
  • Choose creative texts and activities suitable for use in certain classroom contexts and justify this choice
  • Design a series of lessons using creative texts/activities to develop language skills for specified levels of learners
Teaching activities
  • 7 x 2-hour seminars
  • 5 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word portfolio project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about the main historical, phonological, grammatical and lexical processes that have shaped modern English. You'll also learn more about contemporary varieties of English.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss the rise of modern English
  • Critically discuss the diversity of different varieties of English
  • Account for features of early modern English (the period of 1500-1700) from a historical perspective
  • Account for features of modern English from a historical perspective
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,200-word coursework exercises (30% of final mark, each)
  • a 1,600-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll critically reflect on the political, ideological and academic implications of the global forms and functions of English. Key areas include geographical language variation, English and imperialism, (un)equal Englishes, English as an international lingua franca, the academic implications of English as a global language, and language and ideology.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the geography and the history of the spread of English in the world
  • Critically evaluate the key aspects of the sociolinguistics of English in the world
  • Critically reflect on the political, ideological and academic implications of the spread of English in the world
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

Aspects covered include sexist language, the construction of masculine and feminine identities through texts, the language of sexual violence and sexual consent, and the impact of heteronormativity on the construction of sexual identities. You'll focus on how language mediates, and is mediated by, social constructions of sex, gender and sexuality.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a systematic and critical understanding of key concepts, models and research findings associated with language, gender and sexuality
  • Critically engage with texts and identify socially-related assumptions about gender and issues related to gendered discourse
  • Critically evaluate gender views projected by the media
  • Appreciate the different methodologies used in research on gender, language and sexuality
  • Convey complex theories to a non-specialist audience
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 6–8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written blog post (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written analytical report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll focus on the language used on social media, including social networks, blogs, and instant messaging. You'll analyse the effects that computer-mediated practices have on language and on social structures – for example, by investigating the language of online misogyny.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Compare the structure and functions of different types of social media
  • Evaluate various communication strategies on different types of new media
  • Identify ways that electronic communication affects social relationships and identities
  • Demonstrate presentation and public speaking skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll analyse employer expectations and apply your findings to refine your professional profile. You'll also prepare a job application pack, and take part in a mock interview as both a candidate and a recruiter and/or assessor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate your personal professional profile and relate it to the development of effective job application strategies
  • Research and critically evaluate employers' expectations of a candidates' skills, attributes and competences in different sector
  • Evaluate your scores from various Psychometric tests to prepare for an employment assessment
  • Professionally communicate the outcomes of your experience to potential employers by producing a CV, statement, video pitch and a mock and formal job interview
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word practical skills assessment (65% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll learn the ways in which contexts for language affect the words and phrases we choose. You'll also develop practical skills in analysis and description of lexical data, as used in the creation of dictionaries or search engines.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of English lexicology, phraseology and corpus linguistics
  • Appraise the theoretical underpinnings of lexicology
  • Analyse and report on data comprising English lexical and phraseological units
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent Study Time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in a study relevant to their course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance
  • Critically reflect on the formal learning experience and student ambassadorial role for the University, and consider the relevance of this learning to future study and/or employability and personal development
  • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your undergraduate course in the global context
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how legacies of colonialism and imperialism shaped cinematic production in different regions, and  study the impact of the move away from national filmmaking in favour of global funding, distribution and exhibition networks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret, analyse and explain aesthetic, thematic, political and economic concerns of transnational films and filmmakers
  • Apply key theoretical reading to analysis of films
  • Critically assess how new technologies, production and exhibition contexts impact on national and transnational filmmaking
  • Evaluate the relationship of film to wider geo-political agendas and concerns
  • Critically understand and articulate distribution, marketing and reception of transnational work
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and an online web design workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a quiz (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word assignment (70% of final mark) – in this assignment you'll design a website

What you'll do

You'll also work on your ability to produce these texts, using analytical frameworks to evaluate and adapt them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply theoretical frameworks to critically analyse examples of written professional communication
  • Evaluate and produce examples of professional writing
  • Apply knowledge of rhetoric to deliver a professional presentation
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute group oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)

The best part of the course was being given the opportunity and freedom to choose to study the areas I enjoy the most in English Language and Linguistics. For example, I was able to discover and explore my interest in teaching in modules like TESOL and Introduction to Teaching.

Eloise Peters, BA Hons English Language and Linguistics student

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • examinations
  • essays
  • reports
  • case studies
  • book reviews
  • written work
  • projects

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 15% by written exams, 8% by practical exams and 77% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 28% by written exams, 3% by practical exams and 69% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 10% by practical exams and 90% by coursework
Lydia's story
"I love my course because of the wide range of topics we cover..."

Hear what Lydia loves about studying BA (Hons) English Language and Linguistics at University of Portsmouth.

00:00:00  I'm studying English Language 
00:00:01  and Linguistics and I'm in my third year.
00:00:02  I love my course because of the wide 
00:00:04  range of topics we cover
00:00:05  so for example we look at, 
00:00:06  forensic linguistics, clinical, as well as
00:00:08  language in the media 
00:00:09  so it's the wide variety.
00:00:10  I would recommend the University of
00:00:12  Portsmouth to future students
00:00:13  for example one of the main things I've 
00:00:14  used throughout my time here is the 
00:00:16  library, it's 24 hours and it's really
00:00:18  good to have as a base if you need to
00:00:19  leave the house and just escape.
00:00:21  As well as something else I've used
00:00:22  is the student support and well-being 
00:00:25  which is a really good guide to have if 
00:00:26  you need any extra assistance or I 
00:00:28  suppose advice with work or home sickness. 

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • online activities

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

In 2021/22, we're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • Teaching block 1 – early October to January
  • Assessment period 1 – late January to early February
  • Teaching block 2 – February to May
  • Assessment period 2 – May to June

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning development tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning development tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • Improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2021 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year. This fee may be subject to annual increase
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including our Transition Scholarship). This fee may be subject to annual increase
  • International students – £15,500 a year. This fee may be subject to annual increase

You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

In your third year for your placement abroad, you’ll need to fund the costs of travel, transport and accommodation. The exact costs will depend on the destination. If you're studying at one of our partner universities, you won't need to pay fees at your host institution, but there may be other costs such as visa, insurance or extra tuition. If you choose to work abroad, can help you find an internship, which may be paid or unpaid.  

During your placement year, you’ll be eligible for a discounted rate on your tuition fees. Currently, this discount amounts to 90% of the year’s fees.

The costs associated with your specific destination will be discussed during your second year, as well as possible sources of additional funding.

You’ll have the option to take the Trinity College London Certificate in TESOL, which costs £335.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2021, apply through Clearing by completing this short application form, calling our Clearing hotline on +44 (0)23 9284 8074 or going to our Clearing section to chat with us online.

You can also find out how Clearing works, sign up for Clearing updates and book a call back on results day.

International and EU students

Clearing is open to all applicants. But if you'd prefer to apply without going through Clearing, use our online application form.

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – QQ31
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

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