Young people looking at web design and user interface board
UCAS Code
G400
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

If you’re ready to make a career out of your interest in computer tech, then this BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree course will give you the skills and knowledge you need.

You’ll examine every aspect of computing, from programming to networks, and learn to develop the computer applications that are moulding the future. You’ll be able to explore the latest boundary-pushing technology, such as artificial intelligence and robotics.

Interested in becoming a Computer Science teacher? You can combine your computing studies with teacher training and school teaching placements. If successful, you’ll get a £9,000 bursary in your final year and have Qualified Teacher Status alongside your BSc Computer Science degree.

Accredited by

This course is accredited by BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, and meets the academic requirements for registration as a Chartered IT Professional (CITP). This helps you stand out against the competition when it comes to apply for jobs.

What you'll experience

On this degree course, you'll:

  • Get a thorough grounding in hardware, software and information processing
  • Learn from experts with career experience in computer science
  • Get to grips with the technical side of computer systems design and use your knowledge to find solutions to practical problems
  • Use the latest tech and apply your skills to real-life problems via our partnership schemes with charities and organisations
  • Access equipment such as our high performance computer labs, mobile app development lab and usability labs, including the latest eye-tracking technology
  • Build your knowledge in specialist areas of the industry such as cyber-security
  • Make the most of workplace trips, pop-up lectures and hack days, where you'll join forces with other computing students to collaborate on projects and solve challenging problems
  • Have the opportunity to get a £9,000 bursary to train and graduate as a qualified teacher

Careers and opportunities

You’ll graduate with a diverse skill set that covers programming, software development and network management.

What can you do with a Computer Science degree?

This gives you a foundation for a career in areas such as:

  • software engineering
  • web development
  • computer programming
  • network design
  • teaching (with Qualified Teacher Status)

Whatever you decide to do, you’ll get career help, support and guidance for up to 5 years after you graduate from our Careers and Employability service.

Teacher training pathway with £9,000 bursary

Traditionally, if you wanted to qualify as a teacher of computing you’d have to complete a Bachelor’s degree and then progress onto a 1-year Postgraduate Certificate of Education (PGCE). Our Initial Teacher Training (ITT) pathway saves you the extra year of study, plus you get a £9,000 bursary. You’ll graduate with Qualified Teacher Status (QTS), meaning you can start work teaching right away in most schools in England and Wales. 

The ITT option is available for any Computer Science or Computing student. You have to take the level 5 Computing ambassador module as a stepping stone to the ITT in your final year.

Timetabling for this additional qualification is bolted onto your second and third years of study (in 3 phases). You’ll work on placement in a school every weekday from June to mid-July at the end of your second year. Then you’ll do 2 days a week in school in your third year. Finally, you’ll do every day in a school from June to mid-July at the end of your third year. 

Your £9,000 bursary will be paid in 9 x £1,000 instalments from the September of your third year of study, after you register on the ITT pathway.  

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the logical concepts underpinning the design of computer systems
  • Demonstrate the application of practical digital circuit design and optimisation techniques
  • Define the fundamental developments and functions of the CPU and OS (operating system)
  • Apply mathematical skills that support the technical aspects of computing at basic and advanced levels
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute examination (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll learn a brief history of computing.

You'll also discuss its sub-disciplines and its current trends and advances.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Summarise computing's history, sub-disciplines, major advances and trends
  • Explain the key concepts of usability evaluation
  • Describe the major principles of cyber security
  • Apply development technologies and techniques specific to your studies
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour seminars
  • 18 x 1-hour practical workshop classes
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment, including essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word practical set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word practical set exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework set exercise (25% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the lifecycle of systems development to learn how to analyse a business-need, collect requirements, and design a relational database. You'll implement your design using industry standard software.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use structured analysis techniques to identify the requirements of an information system
  • Demonstrate the fundamental principles of database design and development
  • Identify legal, ethical and professional issues associated with information systems
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 18 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll work in practical lab sessions on current and past technologies, using Windows and Linux platforms.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and use computer systems network terminology
  • Define the fundamental principles of computer networking topologies, security and professional standards
  • Describe the 7-layer Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model and discuss its application
  • Examine the fundamental requirements of systems management and security
  • Develop an awareness of the importance of ethics and communication law to the practice of journalism
  • Identify network security and the impact of network vulnerabilities
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about practical programming techniques using the Python and Java programming languages.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design, implement and test algorithms to solve problems using appropriate data types and control structures
  • Design, implement and test object-oriented programs based on a specification
  • Describe and analyse fundamental programming concepts and techniques
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
  • 26 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 8 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 hours of demonstration
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 110 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word practical exercise (60% of final mark)
  • 2 x 1,500-word coursework exercises (20% of final mark, each) – programming coursework assignments

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll also analyse and use these structures as you design efficient algorithms with the efficiency expressed in BigO notation. To choose this unit, you need to have taken a first year programming module, and be confident in elementary mathematics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Construct and use fundamental data structures to solve problems
  • Demonstrate the practical effects of different data structures and typical algorithms
  • Review and analyse the practical effects of using different data structures in the design of algorithms
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 45-minute set exercise exam (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

To study this module, you'll need to take at least one of  the Computer Architectures and Operating Systems, Programming or Application Programming modules in your first year. 

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret and apply mathematical notation for problems in computing science
  • Apply proof techniques and logic in order to prove the correctness of solutions to mathematics problems
  • Apply graph algorithms to solve practical problems
  • Design, write and test programs using a functional programming language
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 500-word set exercise (exam) (10% of final mark)
  • a 1.5-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll look at the implementation of operating systems, microprocessor architectures, routing, mobility, and security protocols. To study this module, you need to take the Architectures and Operating Systems, Networks, and Programming modules in year one.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate a multi-tasking and multi-user operating system
  • Demonstrate the role of concurrency and communication in modern operating systems and processors
  • Analyse the operation of advanced computer architectures and high performance processors
  • Examine the principles, limitations and applications of current computer networks
  • Apply the principles of error control, quality of service and security to networks
  • Develop and interpret simple codes in a system-level programming language
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 1.5-hour written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll then explore the design and implementation of programming language concepts including language evaluation, syntax specification, compilation, control structures, memory allocation and abstraction mechanisms.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design, implement and test programs that use inheritance, polymorphism and exception handling
  • Construct interactive software applications and user interfaces
  • Explain the components of different programming languages and critically compare their designs
  • Formally define the syntax of language constructs and describe the operation of the phases of program compilation
Teaching activities
  • 30 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 1.5-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop and document a medium sized software system as part of a project team. You'll also explore aspects of software development such as planning, requirements engineering, collaborative coding and testing, as well as best practice and application in specific industries.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate the problems of scale in the development of larger software systems
  • Review the diversity of 'difficult' software scenarios and their special problems
  • Apply technical and process solutions to the problems of particular 'straightforward' software developments
  • Discuss software development in a thoughtful, investigative, and well-argued manner
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a set exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll explore virtual reality (VR), 3D web authoring, 3D printing and prototyping, 3D visualisation and simulation, and creation of movies and video games.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the key concepts, processes, principles and issues of 3D computer graphics
  • Appraise and use modelling and animation methods and tools
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute-written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore data mining of unstructured data, business needs for analytic insights and scale-out architectures/platforms to perform analytics queries on large datasets. To study this module, you'll need to take the Programming module in year 1.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of main scale-out and Big Data system architectures.
  • Analyse operating systems issues related to Big Data
  • Design, implement and run algorithms to deal with large structured or unstructured datasets
  • Apply the methods and algorithms for dealing with data streams
Teaching activities
  • 48 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll focus on known classes of vulnerabilities and will cover standard pen-testing techniques such as scanning, intelligence gathering, local/network enumeration, local privilege escalation, persistence and domain privilege escalation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate tools and techniques for intelligence gathering and enumeration, and for enumerating data/command injection vulnerabilities
  • Propose recommendations for securing a system
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of demonstration
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll get the opportunity to put into practice your learning from the first two years of the degree and improve your chances of securing a professional level role upon graduation. Once you successfully pass the module, you’ll be eligible to apply for either ENGTech or ICTTech registration.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate your learning, personal development and future career opportunities
  • Describe tasks undertaken and responsibilities held in the course of (self) employment
  • Differentiate your employability as graduates, as a result of the placement experience
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour seminars
  • 195 hours of placement
Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word portfolio project (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you’ll do

You'll spend five to six days with students in local schools from key stage 2 to sixth form, beginning your initial teacher training (ITT) award. To study this option, you'll need to demonstrate your commitment and suitability for school work, and pass a Disclosure and Barring Service check. 

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the skills required to work in an unfamiliar environment
  • Explain the key aspects of teaching computing in schools, including knowledge of the National Curriculum, appropriate teaching techniques, and computing related topics
  • Devise and evaluate appropriate ways to communicate a difficult principle or concept
  • Reflect on your learning and experience during your time in school
Teaching activities
  • 25 x 1-hour seminars
  • 42 hours on placement
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 175 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (15% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word report (55% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also cover the integration of client and server programs with API-based services, such as database access.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify industry best practices in web application design
  • Design a contemporary web application using industry best practices
  • Evaluate the design and implementation of web applications
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you’ll do

To study this module, you need to take the Operating Systems and Internetworking module in year 2, or show an understanding of communication networking environments from a hardware and software perspective.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate current and emerging issues in the research and development of distributed systems
  • Develop a conceptual model for evaluating distributed systems and their constituent components, encompassing new and emerging technologies, within distributed systems
  • Apply and evaluate authentication and access control techniques for distributed systems
  • Analyse the impact of attacks upon distributed systems.
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word report (60% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour exam (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll analyse relevant issues and literature, propose solutions to your problem, and investigate through lab or field based activities, case studies, surveys, documentary or database research to produce a final report.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Employ best practice methods and approaches to manage a large-scale project
  • Identify and summarise the problem to be solved and put it in context
  • Identify legal, ethical, social and professional issues relevant to your project and take necessary action(s) to address these issues
  • Conduct a formal literature search, identifying, analysing, comparing and contrasting sources and writing an evaluative review
  • Design, implement and test a substantial relevant artefact (or several smaller artefacts)
  • Critically evaluate your work against its objectives, reflecting and generalising on the learning achieved in your written report
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of project supervision
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 382 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10,000-word report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about language theory, automata and sorting problems. To choose this module, you'll need to study the Discrete Mathematics and Functional Programming module in year 2, or show your understanding of basic algebra, set theory, logarithms and the structure of mathematical proof.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse different computation models
  • Demonstrate practical skills in the design of automata
  • Explain the concept of computability
  • Solve and analyse computation complexity of algorithms for practical problems
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2 hours of lectures
  • 12 x 2 hours of practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute set exercise exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll work in a group to research and review selected protocols and techniques or design a solution to an advanced networking problem. To study this module, you'll need to take the Fundamentals of Networks module in year one, and Operating Systems and Internetworking in year two. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the needs and requirements for wireless network technologies
  • Identify the limits and applications of current networks and examine alternative technologies
  • Apply the principles of security, error controls, modulations, and impairments of communication principles to the network technology
  • Evaluate, assess and simulate the different techniques that shape the emergence of new network technologies
  • Analyse, simulate and evaluate current network configurations and technologies, identify issues and provide solutions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1.5-hour written exam (60% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll apply your acquired knowledge in a teaching placement.

To study this module, you need to take the Computing Undergraduate Ambassador module in year 2, have Mathematics and English GCSE at grade C or above (or equivalent), and have passed professional skills tests in literacy and numeracy.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Build effective lessons with clear learning objectives that take into account specific needs of learners and conform to your placement school’s ethos and policies
  • Provide evidence of progress and achievement against the current Teachers’ Standards
  • Demonstrate development of subject knowledge and understanding of methods and practices of teaching Computer Science
  • Demonstrate an understanding of contributory factors that make up a successful school
Teaching activities
  • 27 x 1-hour lectures
  • 27 hours of practical classes & workshops
  • 300 hours on placement
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 346 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word set exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll adopt current tools and practices in the evolving, expanding and diversifying field of software engineering. To study this module, you need to take the Software Engineering Theory and Practice module, and either or both of the Application Engineering and Web Programming modules, in year two.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and develop advanced systems and applications using emerging tools, techniques and technologies
  • Model, create, process and communicate data using open formats and models
  • Test, evaluate and formally report on your work and the technologies used
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark).

What you’ll do

To study this module, you'll need to study the Web Programming module in year 2.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the issues and technological trends that influence the design of a web application
  • Explain the critical features of advanced techniques for web application development
  • Appraise web technologies for use in an application and choose an appropriate architecture for your project
  • Design and implement a web application and web services
  • Integrate web applications with multiple data sources
Teaching activities
  • 12 lectures
  • 12 practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a programming project (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use and reflect on the mathematical foundations of fuzzy logic
  • Choose and apply techniques for building fuzzy systems and networks
  • Analyse and design fuzzy systems and networks with specialised software
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also study the computer vision technology that's essential for developing vision systems in artificial intelligence applications for autonomous vehicles, mobile robots, visual surveillance and welfare monitoring. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise the principles and methods of 3D computer graphics and their current implementations
  • Analyse and solve computer vision problems using essential computer vision methods
  • Apply 3D graphics methods, web programming languages and APIs to real world problems
  • Use and evaluate appropriate computer vision methods and tools
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll examine the fundamental IoT design issues, and the current and emerging hardware and software technologies that are used to support a range of IoT applications.

To study this module, you need to take the Introduction to Programming module in year one, or show Java programming knowledge and a basic understanding of communication networking environments, from both a hardware and a software perspective.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the design and development of technologies on different layers, for typical IoT systems
  • Evaluate the current and emerging issues in the research and development of IoT that cover current architectures, technologies, applications and trends
  • Develop effective applications or protocols to exploit commercially available sensors and actuators in an IoT architecture
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the basic concepts and principles of these nature inspired computational intelligence models, their underlying theories and practical applications.

To study this unit, you need to show competence in at least one programming language and familiarity with basic maths, such as vector and matrix operations, simple function analysis or Boolean operations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise nature inspired computational intelligence models, such as Genetic Algorithms (GA) and Artificial Neural Networks (NN), and discuss their theoretical foundations
  • Design, train, critically evaluate and implement a variety of NN architectures and GA algorithms for solving practical problems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll apply different data mining and machine learning methods to databases and investigate their use for decision support.

To study this unit, you need to take the Database module in year one.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Model and implement a data warehouse
  • Analyse the performance of different data mining techniques
  • Select and apply appropriate data mining techniques for analysis tasks
  • Describe how data mining design and implementation methods could be used to solve problems
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module has been devised for direct entrants to the final year of our computing degrees. If you don't have much experience of the UK, we will provide additional materials to enhance your knowledge of UK education procedures and processes.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate and synthesise theoretical, contextual and practical issues relating to a range of research skills
  • Analyse professional and ethical issues within the ICT discipline
  • Reflect on and critically evaluate the extent to which the existing BCS/IEEE professional codes of practice and ethics might apply in actual workplace situations
  • Evaluate opportunities for IT in computing
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of tutorials
  • 24 hours of lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore theoretical and practical aspects of computational intelligence and robotics, such as kinematics, sensing, motion control and human-robot interaction. To study this module, you need to take the Introduction to Programming module in year one, or show programming experience and knowledge of fundamental mathematics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise the principles and methods of robot sensing and motion control
  • Analyse different approaches and techniques in the robot sensing and control algorithms and systems
  • Apply computational intelligent algorithms to real robotic systems
  • Implement and develop practical programming skills for robot decision-making, robot motion control and human-robot interaction and collaboration in modern robotic systems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

To study this module, you need to take a mathematics module and demonstrate your understanding of data representation (such as hexadecimal and binary.).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Synthesise a secure computer system
  • Evaluate common cryptographic techniques
  • Analyse a cryptographic system, identify vectors for attack, and determine mechanisms for closing vulnerabilities
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 500-word portfolio (10% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (40% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

I chose to study computer science at Portsmouth because the University is well known for its high teaching standards, modern facilities and diverse culture. Applying as an international student, I was confident settling in would be pretty easy.

Hassana Sadiq, Computing Student

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • multiple choice tests
  • in-class exercises
  • written exams
  • mini projects
  • presentations
  • written reports
  • review articles

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 33% by written exams and 67% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 58% by written exams, 3% by practical exams and 39% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 22% by written exams and 78% by coursework

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your CV.

If you combine your degree with teacher training, you'll do teaching placements as part of your course.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • tutorials
  • laboratory work
  • project work

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops for about 13 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

Laboratory support

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Computer Science degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, including an A Level in a relevant subject.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,400 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Apply

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – G400
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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