Criminology and Forensic Studies BSc (Hons)

Forensic evidence and fingerprint identification in progress
UCAS Code
LF34
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

Are you interested in understanding how forensic evidence is used to help solve crime?

This BSc (Hons) Criminology and Forensic Studies degree course examines the field of crime and criminality and pairs it with the world of forensic investigation. You’ll get a deep understanding of what makes a criminal, from a societal, psychological and law perspective. And you’ll get out of the classroom to get to grips with the latest forensic theory and practice.

This course leads to careers in areas such as research and intelligence analysis, crime scene investigation, and probation and police work.

Professional recognition

By choosing certain optional units on this course, you can get pre-entry qualifications for a career in probation work and community justice.

What you'll experience

On this Criminology and Forensic Studies degree course, you'll:

  • Explore criminology while using the latest forensic facilities in one of the largest criminology departments in the country
  • Have access to a biology lab and a forensic crime scene examination house
  • Work alongside crime and forensics professionals via our partnerships with bodies including Hampshire Constabulary and Hampshire Fire and Rescue Service
  • Tailor your degree to match your interests and workplace ambitions
  • Learn from criminology, probation and policing experts and interact with practitioners from criminal justice agencies, businesses and charitable organisations
  • Go on visits to relevant destinations, like the Hampshire Constabulary fingerprint bureau and military CSI training headquarters.
  • Attend guest talks from career specialists, such as fire investigators and forensic odontologists

You can also:

  • Spend a year abroad, studying with an international partner university
  • Learn a new language and get credits towards your degree

My favourite part of my course is the passionate lecturers who are experts in their field who make the course not only up-to-date, but keep the content exciting! 

Rebecca Slattery, BSc Hons Criminology & Forensic Studies student

Careers and opportunities

When you complete the course, you’ll be prepared for a range of criminal justice careers where forensic awareness plays a key role. You can work as a forensic practitioner within the police, probation and prison services or in the fields of community safety, crime prevention and criminological research.

What jobs can you do with a Criminology and Forensic Studies degree?

Roles previous graduates have gone on to include:

  • investigative data analyst
  • police officer
  • probation officer
  • youth offending support officer
  • emergency planning officer
  • offender case administrator
  • prison officers
  • civilian investigator

You could also do postgraduate study in areas such as forensic sciences.

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Criminology and Forensic Studies degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

The approach taken combines the links between investigative practice, crime scene control, and the recovery of evidence and its analysis, crossing disciplinary boundaries. You’ll be introduced to the core theory and practical skills required to progress the investigation from crime scene to court.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate the core processes of forensic science practice
  • Discuss different analytical techniques and how to properly maximise evidence potential
  • Describe and identify the different ways in which forensic science evidence is uncovered, analysed and documented
  • Outline and explain evidence recovery procedures, for evidence taken from the scene and from individuals
  • Perform fundamental forensic science techniques
Teaching activities
  • 19 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 hours of seminars
  • 14 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 137 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the historical analysis of criminal justice systems and the core contemporary aspects of those systems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the historical development of criminal justice
  • Describe the key functions of current criminal justice agencies
  • Discuss philosophies and methods of punishment used in criminal justice
  • Recognise and reflect on examples of multi-agency working in criminal justice
  • Develop skills relating to independent working and effective teamwork
  • Obtain knowledge contributing to the ability to make informed career decisions within the sector
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1.5-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word portfolio project (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll focus on the skills required for success in your first year and that will build the foundations for success in your second and third years. You’ll develop an understanding of the core concepts in social sciences research, and become confident with your academic skills in relation to reading, writing, presenting, reflecting, and critical thinking.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the fundamental aspects of academic scholarship
  • Differentiate between the quality of academic sources
  • Reflect on personal developmental needs and make informed career decisions
  • Understand fundamental elements of research in criminology
  • Understand basic principles of quantitative and qualitative research
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the subject area and interrelationships with other relevant subjects
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 342 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (30% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to the core theoretical approaches in psychology, with a focus on the practical application of theories within the criminal justice system. These theories cover criminal investigation, treatment of offenders, risk assessment, policing and researching crime.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Engage creatively across disciplines
  • Locate and access information relevant to the subject area
  • Consider applications of theories to solve problems in society
  • Develop appreciation of ethical practice
  • Communicate ideas effectively in written form
  • Develop a reflective understanding of the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Starting from the seventeenth century, it charts the development of the social sciences through the Renaissance and Enlightenment period. You’ll examine the development of criminological analysis, considering the rise of the scientific study of crime and criminality, and review the multi-disciplinary nature of the subject area.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the historical context and origins of the subject area
  • Describe the key ideas that drove the development of the social sciences
  • Think independently and creatively across discipline boundaries
  • Recognise and apply new and existing knowledge in relation to explaining criminal behavior
  • Outline and describe the social, cultural, political and economic contexts that influenced the development of criminology and criminological thinking
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1.5-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll focus on the scientific analysis of a variety of evidence types following collection at the scene. This module is a core part of your BSc (Hons) Criminology and Forensic Studies degree, recognised by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the role of forensic science practitioners within the investigative process
  • Examine the current techniques used for forensic science analysis
  • Recognise good practice methodologies for analysing evidence
  • Compare and contrast the application of scientific methodology in the analysis of evidence
  • Discuss the analysis of forensic evidence and issue regarding its application to investigations and legal proceedings
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1000-word essay (30% of your final mark)
  • a 2000-word report (70% of your final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about the significance of forensic findings and how these findings impact the criminal justice system. This module is a core part of your BSc (Hons) Criminology and Forensic Studies degree, recognised by the Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the core sciences used in the forensic investigation process
  • Identify different types of forensic evidence, and understand the interpretative techniques used in investigating them
  • Evaluate the methodologies used in the interpretation of forensic evidence
  • Communicate the results of a forensic investigation effectively
  • Explain the importance of the interpretation of forensic evidence, and the impact this has on legal proceedings
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 18 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 1500-word essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2500-word report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your understanding of the role criminology and the social sciences have had in engineering social order. You’ll explore accounts from critical social theory and sociological analysis of social control in relation to social and cultural resistance and dissent against the imposition of control and social engineering by the state.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Appraise different critical standpoints of social control
  • Locate, access and critically engage with information pertinent to the subject matter
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice
  • Develop a further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 7.5 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute coursework exercise (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll use practical research work as the basis for understanding research in criminology and use this to develop a viable research proposal for your third year dissertation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area and apply it to your own research projects
  • Analytically and critically think about research in criminology
  • Develop your skills in research for wider application
  • Identify the ethical issues inherent in criminology research and develop responses to these issues
  • Critically evaluate how research can generate creative solutions to societal issues
  • Work independently and in groups on research projects, delivering the results of these projects in a variety of forms
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour lectures
  • 8 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 4 hours of fieldwork study
  • 6 hours of project supervision

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-page piece of coursework (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

Optional Modules

What you'll do

The core themes are state crimes (of commission and omission) and the response of the international community, particularly the response of international judicial, state and inter-governmental, and global civil society actors. You’ll explore crimes against humanity (including genocide and war crimes) and against democracy, state-corporate crime, contemporary slavery and the trafficking of humans.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop critical, reflective knowledge and understanding of state crimes concepts (of commission and omission), examining and critiquing the boundaries of subject knowledge in a disciplinary context
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of commission, including crimes against humanity and State Crimes Against Democracy
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of omission, including state-corporate and environmental market-based crimes, contemporary slavery and trafficking of human beings
  • Apply existing knowledge to generate ideas and creative solutions in the international communities' response to state crimes, with a sense of responsibility and a commitment to ethical practice and social justice
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore investigative strategies, the police approach, policies and procedures and the application of forensic science techniques in these investigations. You’ll learn the theoretical aspects of this module in a series of workshops that incorporate mini-lectures, guest speakers and practical activities.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and compare police working practices in the investigation of firearms incidents
  • Reflect upon the challenges faced by police in differing contexts when investigating firearms incidents
  • Examine and apply methods of evidence recovery from firearms
  • Examine and deploy methods of evidence recovery from scenes involving deployment of firearms
  • Critically evaluate the criminological aspects of gun crime with reference to the literature
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

Economic crime comes in many types and forms so taking a holistic approach is essential to understand the true nature of these cases.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and recognise disciplinary perspectives on the concept of economic crime in criminological, legal, and economic frameworks
  • Discuss and explain the drivers of societal risks associated with economic crime drawing on criminological, legal, political science, economic, and sociological perspectives
  • Demonstrate understanding of the main types of economic crime
  • Analyse information about major economic crime cases from a variety of sources and debate their wider societal implications
  • Retrieve and analyse information from a variety of sources
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore what security means, and how security needs are being addressed, at different levels of analysis and policy implementation from the international, national and community dimensions right through to that of the individual citizen.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise disciplinary perspectives on the concept of security within a criminological framework
  • Critically discuss the drivers of societal risk and insecurity
  • Recognise the nature and impact of economic and political developments
  • Explain and assess the many forms of threat to the security of states, corporations and individuals
  • Identify and assess responses to security threats at the global, national, local, corporate and individual levels
  • Locate, interpret, question and summarise information from a number of different sources
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework project (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll use seven simple questions as the basis for understanding and learning: what is hate crime, how much of it is there, who is involved/affected, where is it occurring, when is it occurring, why is it occurring, and what can be done about it? The module gives you a holistic appreciation and understanding of the phenomenon commonly referred to as 'hate crime'.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to the subject area
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice issues
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how your core criminological and psychology knowledge combine in relation to missing persons investigation and literature. You’ll examine real missing persons cases, and critically analyse how these cases have been dealt with in the criminal justice system and by society as a whole.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and differentiate the types and categories of missing person cases that are dealt with in the UK and elsewhere
  • Identify and discuss the role and impact of the agencies responding to or involved in dealing with missing persons incidents, including the media
  • Examine and interpret the overlap between missing person's cases and types of serious crime
  • Appraise and critique the appropriateness and effectiveness of responses by key agencies to missing persons incidents and identify areas for improvement
  • Apply relevant criminological and psychological theories to missing people, their families, responders, and offenders
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore issues such as mental health problems, violence, gangs and gender. You'll argue for the need for change in the criminal justice system to address issues for the creation of a more humane and effective system.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge of the principles and practices of penology
  • Engage creatively with the multi disciplinary basis of the subject area
  • Apply knowledge for the development of creative solutions to intractable problems
  • Engage in an ethical evaluation of the justifications for punishment
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop the fundamental knowledge required to work in the criminal justice system. You’ll gain an understanding of the legal and ethical parameters in which the police and the criminal justice system operate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject area
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject matter
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the concept of 'diversity' and its historical and current context. You'll then consider the notion of diversity when applied to the various roles, priorities and challenges that exist within modern policing.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise 'diversity' and its associated concepts
  • Examine the role and social context of policing organisations
  • Analyse and reflect on responses to diversity in the context of policing
  • Indicate the need to implement ethical practice within policing
  • Understand the subject area that permits the development of creative solutions to related issues in various industries
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 168 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine public and private organisations investigating economic crime, looking at the roles and techniques used by the Serious Fraud Office (SFO), City of London Police (CoLP), National Crime Agency (NCA), and Europol as well as those in the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), Local Authorities and Trading Standards. You'll get presentations of first-hand accounts from representatives of these organisations on the complex nature of investigating economic crimes and examine companies with their own in-house provision and other entities such as FACT (the UK’s leading intellectual property protection organisation).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and recognise the varying disciplinary perspectives on the concept of the principles of economic crime investigation within criminological, legal, and economic frameworks
  • Familiarise yourself with the main types of organisations involved in investigating economic crime—including SFO, NCA and FCA
  • Identify the different modes of investigative techniques employed in investigating economic crime
  • Analyse information on the investigation techniques employed in real economic crime cases
  • Gather, retrieve, and analyse information from a variety of sources
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also look at national and international law, the role of police wildlife crime officers, and investigation and forensic evidence.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the different types of wildlife crime and summarise environmental factors
  • Recognise and examine the importance of environmental justice and sustainability
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to environmental justice and wildlife crime
  • Interpret and assess new and existing knowledge
  • Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and identify further opportunities in the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop an holistic and fully rounded knowledge of youth crime and youth justice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about youth crime and youth justice
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to youth crime and youth justice
  • Recognise and discuss the importance of youth justice issues
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)
  • a practical exercise (20% of final mark)

Optional sandwich year

Optional modules

What you'll do

Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
  • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
  • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
  • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1,125 hours on placement
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll put together your own personal, independent research which can take many forms depending on the aims and focus of the dissertation/project.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a viable dissertation/project proposal
  • Utilise a range of current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Deploy established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to the subject
  • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to either the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 hours of project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 385 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 9,000-word dissertation (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop the basic knowledge needed to understand the management of investigations into serious and possible organised crime. You’ll develop an understanding of strategies and major incident procedures. You'll also look at the application of forensic science and of the legal and ethical parameters the police and criminal justice system operate in.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject
  • Analyse and evaluate both new and existing knowledge
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject matter
  • Critically analyse information from a variety of sources and develop an argument
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine current key issues in the forensic sciences, focusing on the benefit of interdisciplinary knowledge transfer, the importance of transparency, and the value of future technologies and capabilities.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Contextualise the current landscape of the forensic sciences
  • Critically evaluate core current issues with the forensic sciences
  • Explain the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to forensic investigation in terms of practice and a robust evidence base
  • Critically discuss the value of forensic techniques
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

Optional Modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conduct a multidisciplinary theoretical analysis of terrorism studies, terrorism, terrorists and pathways to terrorism and political violence
  • Systematically compare and contrast differing forms of terrorism
  • Critically reflect on differing counter terrorist strategies and tactics, policies and practices
  • Locate, access and critically engage with digital information related to terrorist groups globally
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 168 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,500-word coursework reports (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You’ll explore its origins, development, definitions, typologies, technologies, levels of social harm and possible modes of governance. The module is situated and contextualised in contemporary criminological thinking about, and technological challenges to, existing notions of crime and governance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop a knowledge and understanding of cybercrime that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively question current debates on cybercrime in relevant academic disciplines
  • Critically analyse and appraise new and existing knowledge
  • Critically locate, access and engage with information related to the subject area using digital technologies
  • Independently develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject area
  • Work independently and with others
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the concepts of dangerousness and risk, and how sexual and violent offenders are risk assessed and managed. You'll develop your critical understanding and appreciation of dangerousness and public protection through analysis and debates including those from the USA, Canada and Australia.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is critical, reflective and questioning
  • Think independently and develop knowledge and comprehension of risk assessments, including the metrics of risk of harm and reoffending
  • Engage intellectually, analyse and appraise new and existing knowledge
  • Locate, access and engage with information about the subject area
  • Recognise and critically discuss the importance of public protection issues
  • Work independently and with others effectively
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 9 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 169 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word risk management plan report (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll advance your understanding of psychological theory and principles studied in your first and second years, and consider the relationship of theories to criminal justice issues. You’ll study core areas where psychology has had an influence on investigation, and topics such as cognitive interview and detecting deceit.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Locate and combine information relevant to the subject area
  • Critically consider applications of psychological theory to solve problems in a forensic setting
  • Communicate ideas effectively in written form
  • Develop a critical understanding of the subject area
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine a variety of relevant subjects including field archaeology, physical anthropology, entomology, botany, geology and environmental sciences and their use in investigations. You’ll develop the skills and knowledge required to interpret and understand post-mortem factors and their use in locating, identifying and determining pertinent data to inform the investigation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise the methods available to assist investigations of unidentified and decomposed remains
  • Demonstrate critical awareness of combining scene and investigative data to formulate appropriate interpretations and conclusions
  • Critically appraise the challenges of death investigation and factors constraining or affecting interpretations
  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the biological, chemical and environmental factors relevant to the decomposition of artefacts and remains
  • Critically compare existing research for the purpose of formulating new ideas and methodologies
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 8 hours of fieldwork study
  • 2 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore how pathways to crime are influenced by gender, focusing on offending, victimisation, punishment, treatment, rehabilitation and our understanding of crime and the criminal.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse the importance of understanding crime from a gendered perspective
  • Evaluate the influence of gendered perspectives on our understanding of crime and criminology
  • Compare and contrast gendered pathways into crime
  • Critically analyse gendered responses to crime
  • Examine the impact of gender on professionals working in criminal justice agencies
  • Critically analyse the female experiences of the criminal justice system
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore eco-philosophy, before examining theory, perpetrators, victimology, and law and regulation. You’ll study the complexities of policing and investigation, and highlight the role of both environmental forensics and citizen activism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise environmental criminology and other theoretical perspectives on 'green crime'
  • Critically analyse the nature, scale and range of perpetrators and victims surrounding environmental crime
  • Examine the role of environmental law and regulation
  • Assess the importance of environmental risk assessments
  • Examine the organisations engaged in the policing and investigation of environmental crime at a national and international level
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll get a detailed understanding of the role of the intelligence analyst, their techniques and methods, and the theoretical foundations of their profession. You'll develop a critical appreciation of the different forms, benefits and potential weaknesses of intelligence analysis.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the fundamentals of intelligence analysis in terms of the different practices, types and products
  • Develop an understanding of the role of the intelligence analyst and their role in an investigative team
  • Critically examine and demonstrate how strategic intelligence analysis helps inform policy and decision-making in public and private organisations
  • Appraise how intelligence analysis technologies and techniques can support investigations into forms of serious and organised crime
  • Critically examine and demonstrate how social network analysis represents a scientific alternative to conventional intelligence analysis
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop the basic knowledge needed to understand the management of investigations into serious and possible organised crime. You’ll develop an understanding of strategies and major incident procedures. You'll also look at the application of forensic science and of the legal and ethical parameters the police and criminal justice system operate in.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Independently, analytically and creatively think about the subject
  • Analyse and evaluate both new and existing knowledge
  • Develop further intellectual curiosity for the subject matter
  • Critically analyse information from a variety of sources and develop an argument
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll look at topics such as poor police investigations and case construction, issues arising from court procedures, the use of 'junk science' and questionable expert witnesses. You’ll examine the major impact that forensic science advances have had on the detection and prevention of wrongful convictions, and review the aftermath following an overturned conviction.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically and reflectively assess the causes of miscarriages of justice
  • Critically analyse miscarriages of justice using a holistic and cross-disciplinary approach
  • Using a range of theoretical approaches, assess the impact that forensic science advances have had on the detection and prevention of miscarriages of justice
  • Critically examine the basic rights of suspects from the initial investigation and first trial to the appeals process and beyond, including the role of the Criminal Cases Review Commission
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine compliance systems, including how organisations must manage complex issues emerging from the rapidly changing legal and regulatory environment. You’ll then learn about specific compliance issues in the area of money laundering

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply your knowledge and understanding of core terms and concepts relating to economic explanation for law, organisation and compliance in the area of anti-money laundering (AML)
  • Apply the knowledge and understanding of the main AML legal and regulatory structures to new situations
  • Critically evaluate AML legal and regulatory structures and develop arguments while being aware of the limits of knowledge
  • Apply written communication skills and make use of library-based and community-based research opportunities
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework report (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop a deeper understanding of the legal and ethical parameters in which murder are investigated and critically examine the framework and complexities in the criminal justice system.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning
  • Evaluate the reasons why murder investigations fail in relation to policy and practical development
  • Analyse and appraise both new and existing knowledge
  • Engage intellectually and critically with the subject matter
  • Analyse a variety of sources and develop an argument
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to political science debates that focus on political ideologies of right-wing extremism. You’ll examine political parties, pressure groups and street movements such as the British Union of Fascists, the National Front, the British National Party and the ""counter-jihad"" English Defence League and Britain First.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise key debates from political science on the extreme right
  • Demonstrate detailed knowledge and critical understanding of the historical development and current position(s) of the extreme right
  • Critically analyse and evaluate contemporary criminological arguments on the extreme right
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll analyse employer expectations and apply your findings to refine your professional profile. You'll also prepare a job application pack, and take part in a mock interview as both a candidate and a recruiter and/or assessor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate your personal professional profile and relate it to the development of effective job application strategies
  • Research and critically evaluate employers' expectations of a candidates' skills, attributes and competences in different sector
  • Evaluate your scores from various Psychometric tests to prepare for an employment assessment
  • Professionally communicate the outcomes of your experience to potential employers by producing a CV, statement, video pitch and a mock and formal job interview
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word practical skills assessment (65% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll look at a variety of approaches to treatment and rehabilitation and the application of these approaches in criminal justice practice.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse concepts of treatment and rehabilitation towards people in the criminal justice system
  • Evaluate theoretical approaches to treatment and rehabilitation
  • Critically examine and apply theoretical debates around rehabilitation to criminal justice practice
  • Compare and contrast different approaches to rehabilitation
  • Effectively communicate research and theories related to the treatment and rehabilitation of specific offender groups and offending behaviours (domestic abuse, sexual offending, substance-related offending, youth crime, offending by women)
  • Critically analyse future directions for the treatment and rehabilitation of those in the criminal justice system
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 25-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • coursework
  • practical crime scene assessments
  • examinations
  • presentations
  • group projects
  • a dissertation

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 27% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 66% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 3% by practical exams and 97% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 8% by written exams, 5% by practical exams and 87% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the crime and forensics field.

Previous students have secured placement positions at organisations such as Hampshire Constabulary and Hampshire Fire and Rescue.

You can also spend this year studying overseas at one of our partner universities in Europe, south Asia and North America.

We’ll help you secure a work or study placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • group discussions
  • practical workshops
  • forensic crime scene examinations

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Criminology and Forensic Studies degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 10 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning Development Tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty Learning Development Tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Criminology and Forensic Studies degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 96-128 points from 3 A levels or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What skills and qualities do I need for this Criminology and Forensics Studies degree course?

As well as meeting the entry requirements, it's useful if you're inquisitive, hard working and have the ability to pay attention to detail.

How can I prepare for a Criminology and Forensic Studies degree?

Keeping up to date with crime and forensics in the media is good preparation for this course. For example, watching crime, criminal justice and forensic documentaries gives you a realistic perspective of processes involved in this area, which you'll study in more detail on the course.

It's also a good idea to read a range of tabloid and broadsheet articles on crime, and related subjects.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll need to pay additional costs of £50–£1000 to cover travel, accommodation or subsistence if you take a placement abroad. The amount you’ll pay will vary, depending on the location and length of your stay.

Common questions about this subject

Can't find the answer to your questions about this course or anything else about undergraduate life? Contact us

Common criminology and forensic studies questions

Criminology is the study of crime and criminal justice, including its causes, responses and prevention.

Forensic studies is the study of forensic, crime scene and criminal investigation, including forensic evidence analysis and interpretation.

This Criminology and Forensic Studies degree brings together these topics, providing an integrated understanding of criminal investigation with the application of forensic methods.

Because of ongoing funding pressures, criminal justice roles outside the usual policing and probation networks are expanding. Populations are increasing, crime is not disappearing and society needs more support than ever.

This means the future demand for criminology and forensic studies graduates is likely to be high.

People who work in this area do so because they want to have a significant, positive impact on society.

Careers in this area are hugely rewarding, because you work with vulnerable people, victims of crime, and sometimes perpetrators of crime, helping get them back into society.

Every day is different. Every crime scene is different.

As well as preparing you for employment in areas such as policing, probation, forensics, intelligence or counter-fraud, this degree allows you to gain valuable transferable skills including research skills, written and oral communication skills, attention to detail and social policy knowledge that you can apply to many careers.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – LF34
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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