History student using primary sources
UCAS Code
V100
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

If you’re fascinated by history, there’s no better place to study it than Portsmouth, a city that's played a key role in the past of Britain.

On this BA (Hons) History degree course, you’ll explore the past and bring it to life, through practical study. You’ll pick the periods of time that interest you most, both in British and global history, and develop your skills in research and analysis.

After the course, you'll have sought-after qualities you can transfer easily to the workplace in roles that involve analysis, research, communication and teamwork.

95% Graduates in work or further study (Unistats data on DLHE 2017)

92% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2019)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this History degree course you’ll:

  • Tailor your studies to your interests and the periods of history that excite you most
  • Have access to primary and secondary historical sources through local organisations and archive subscriptions
  • Learn from staff who are members of the Centre for European and International Studies Research (CEISR), the UK's largest research centre of its kind
  • Enhance your studies by taking advantage of our close links with the National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth Records Service and the D-Day Museum
  • Explore current debates about the past and how it's interpreted, with expert scholars in the field
  • Study in a city that has played a major role in the history of Britain

Optional pathways

You can follow optional sociology or politics pathways through this degree, or include it as a pathway in our English Literature, American Studies or International Relations courses. It'll lead to one of these awards at the end of the course:

Careers and opportunities

Employers from every area of industry value history graduates. When you complete the course, you'll have the ability to analyse and manage large amounts of information, communicate effectively, research in groups or independently, and write in a concise and informative way.

What can you do with a History degree?

Previous graduates have gone on to pursue roles in areas such as:

  • journalism
  • law
  • teaching
  • administration
  • the heritage sector
  • publishing
  • research for media production companies

What jobs can you do with a History degree?

Roles they've taken on include:

  • archivist
  • recruitment consultant
  • museum curator
  • public relations officer
  • information analyst

You could also continue your studies at Master's or PhD level.

When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry. After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years as you advance in your career.

The history degree at Portsmouth has been very enjoyable and the city itself boasts a wealth of material that has been beneficial to my learning.

Connor Jones, BA Hons History student

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) History degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll explore significant turning points and important underlying themes in a chronological fashion.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss core developments and themes across the period and assess their significance
  • Develop an appreciation of various historians' views and approaches to the period
  • Apply knowledge of specific examples to understand larger historical trends in early modern and modern European society
  • Reflect on the extent of social, cultural and political change in European society across the early modern and modern period
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (30% of final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how historians construct arguments by gathering and interpreting evidence and challenging orthodox views and historical perspectives. You’ll examine how historical debates evolve, how contemporary contexts inform the historians' writing and reflect on how to unpack arguments and employ analysis in your own work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of historiography in debates, and identify and appraise different strands of historiography in social and cultural history
  • Describe and reflect on different strands of historiography
  • Describe how historiography has evolved in a number of historical controversies
  • Discuss a variety of historical controversies in small and medium size groups
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-hour oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,250-word coursework project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore a variety of primary source examples including written, visual and digital materials. You’ll examine issues of the bias inherent in all sources and how historians deal with the impartial and incomplete record of the past they present.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss different types of primary sources
  • Apply historiographical debates about the use of primary sources to specific examples
  • Discuss the nature of primary sources for historians
  • Develop an understanding of the wide range of primary sources that historians now draw on in their work
  • Identify bias and discuss its importance for the ways in which sources might be analysed
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework project (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and discuss important developments and themes across the period and assess their significance
  • Develop an appreciation of a range of historiographical views and approaches to the period
  • Apply knowledge of specific examples to understand larger historical trends in early modern and modern societies around the world
  • Reflect on the extent of social, cultural and political change across the early modern and modern period in a number of places around the world
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

Through a series of voluntary round-tables, visiting speakers, student symposia, tutor-led sessions, and professional-practice training: The academic enrichment programme engages you with contemporary events and issues, and emerging agendas, in order to remain a vibrant and relevant module. The programme is an inclusive environment which brings you together with other students from different degrees and disciplines.

Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops

What you'll do

Continuing the work of induction and underpinning the wider first year curriculum, you’ll develop practical and methodological skills that enhance your independent learning and your delivery of well-articulated written and verbal materials for assessment. You'll work intensively with a tutor in weekly small-group workshops, guiding you through all the key elements of the first year of your degree.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect successfully on engagement with the practice of group work at university level, and develop strategies to maximise the educational benefits from this engagement
  • Demonstrate the development of a critical awareness of your own skills and qualities in approaching the reading and writing of academic English, and of strategies and practices to enhance your performance in such tasks
  • Engage in debate over the essential conceptual and methodological frameworks of cultural and social history, and articulate a developing awareness of your own perspectives and decisions in such debates
  • Demonstrate consistent engagement with learning tasks through the VLE, and development of competencies in online and library-based information-handling tasks
  • Proactively identify various personal development needs, and address them through a menu of support options
  • Complete a range of tailored assessments to demonstrate individual and group engagement with the fundamental techniques of historical research, analysis and presentation in written and oral forms
Teaching activities
  • 72 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 328 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a continuous assessment of tutor-group workshop preparation and contribution (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word portfolio project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (30% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

Through a series of voluntary round-tables, visiting speakers, student symposia, tutor-led sessions, and professional-practice training: The academic enrichment programme engages you with contemporary events and issues, and emerging agendas, in order to remain a vibrant and relevant module. The programme is an inclusive environment which brings you together with other students from different degrees and disciplines.

Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops

What you'll do

You’ll explore the ways in which historians identify and engage with primary sources as part of their broad research agenda which will develop your understanding about the nature of historical evidence and how to begin to identify the kinds of sources available to historians. You’ll focus on the need for evaluation, interpretation, contestation and contextualisation in the research process and work with a variety of historical source materials to recognise the kinds of issues involved in using such evidence.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine the diversity of approaches to the study of history, and have a critical and reflective knowledge and understanding of historical research with both the ability and readiness to question its practices
  • Evaluate a variety of historical source materials by thinking independently, analytically and creatively
  • Exhibit the communication skills required in both oral and written evaluation of sources and the ability to contextualise primary source materials
  • Develop intellectual curiosity and embrace the challenges of selecting and researching sources independently
  • Locate, access and critically engage with archives, either physical or digital
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,000-word blog entry assignment (60% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your presentation skills, your ability to engage in rigorous and detailed debate, and enhance your interpretative and analytical skills. This module develops the intellectual and conceptual sophistication needed in your third year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse themes relating to the social, cultural, and economic history of the period
  • Evaluate the connections between social, economic, cultural and political factors through group discussion and essays
  • Critically appraise historiographical interpretations surrounding these topics through individual reading, essays, and small and whole group discussion
  • Express yourself appropriately in oral and written form to actively participate in group discussions and self-manage your learning activities
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 177 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 6 x assessed seminars (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to theoretical and conceptual ways of thinking about leadership, and to thinking in practice from different disciplinary perspectives. You’ll use different leaders as case studies to draw on conceptual themes such as power/authority, policy, performance, context, chance, and political capital/popularity,

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess key moments in British politics from the Post-war period to the present day
  • Distinguish between different leadership styles and evaluate their significance
  • Assess how and to what purpose leadership power is exercised collectively and personally
  • Manage, assess and critically interpret political sources
  • Use a variety of interdisciplinary theories/concepts in analysing British politics and leadership
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll consider who defines what is and isn’t acceptable, how those standards have changed over time, and how people have resisted the restrictions placed on them. You’ll examine notions of self-censorship and self-regulation, as well as ideas of control and agency as a basis for critically engaging with the notion of state power in different historical periods.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources and appraise different aspects of censorship, state power and control
  • Compare and critically reflect on different notions of human control and agency and the various ways that these operated in different locations under contrasting regimes
  • Differentiate between the historiographical approaches towards notions of censorship, state power and control
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively, in a range of different formats
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures/seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the current labour market and the changing definition of a ""career"". You'll also investigate intergenerational relationships, and whether we make career choices alone or instead uphold the work values of our parents and family.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an awareness of employment and the labour market, specifically the social science study of careers and work life balance
  • Outline, compare and contrast different understandings of work, why we do this, how it is informed by our background, and how this effects our identity
  • Creatively and reflectively apply key ideas about how work is performed and understood in people’s lives
  • Use learning technologies to assess and evaluate current debates about the social and cultural dimensions of work in written formats
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine various themes including anxiety, aspirations, agency and experience which you’ll use to focus on how popular culture has repeatedly been a source of unease for elites. You’ll explore the fears and moral panics arising from different forms of popular culture in the early modern and modern periods while looking at how popular culture could serve as a form of opposition to respectable ‘norms’, a means of aspiration and social improvement for some, and a form of unity.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the ways in which different social groups have understood and experienced popular cultures over time
  • Communicate ideas and arguments effectively, in a range of different formats
  • Examine and evaluate differing historiographical views on popular culture across the period of the module
  • Analyse a range of primary and secondary sources relating to popular cultures
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll critically examine intertwined political, ideological, social, economic and cultural themes from this period.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate core historiographical debates in Russian and Soviet history and examine the influence of the wider political context such as the Cold War and Soviet collapse on the writing of history
  • Analyse the interplay between different factors in determining the causes and course of the 1917 Russian Revolution
  • Compare and contrast the role of different factors in determining the development of the soviet state
  • Assess the usefulness of different models and approaches in analysing soviet society and politics in the 1930s
  • Examine the effects of social and political development on core themes in Russian and Soviet politics and society
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll evaluate various sociological, feminist and queer theories on the social construction of gender and sexuality, and apply these to current debates. You'll also develop the analytical tools to challenge contemporary views that we now live in an equal 'post-feminist' society.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of and engage with different sociological, feminist, queer (and related) theories of gender and sexuality
  • Use various theories to analyse the social world and everyday experience
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how gender and sexuality intersect with other social categories and positions
  • Recognise the importance of locating analyses of gender and sexuality in social, historical and geographical contexts
  • Develop a theoretically-informed essay plan based on a set essay question
  • Construct and present a theoretically-informed essay, exploring a topic related to the module in-depth
  • Learn from and implement feedback to develop future work
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 3-hour lectures and seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll analyse the relationship between ideology and the operation of political parties, social movements and government policy-making and explore how ideologies have developed and what role they play in individual and group identity. You’ll adopt a global perspective to look  at the 'classic' Western-oriented ideologies and considers ideologies from a non-Western perspective and context.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess the status, logic and consistency of ideologies
  • Assess and account for the significance and role of ideologies in political contexts and periods
  • Discuss the relationship between ideologies and the conduct of politics (in parties, movements, leadership)
  • Evaluate the contribution of key thinkers to the development of political ideologies
  • Discuss the relationship between ideology and individual and group identities
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars 
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at questions of how national identities are constructed, how they change over time, and who is considered part of a national or ethnic community and who is excluded.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore the formation of national and ethnic identities through case studies
  • Evaluate scholarly debates about national identities, ethnic identities and nationalism
  • Apply theoretical and methodological approaches to a number of different case studies
  • Conduct research through focused reading, examine primary sources, and communicate findings effectively
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word document commentary (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word documentary essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the history and ongoing existence of race and racism in the West. To achieve this, you'll look at the development of modern racism in relation to colonial and 'scientific' notions of separate peoples, and in relation to the rise of 'colour-blind' racism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Engage critically and reflectively with theoretical and empirical literature on race and racism
  • Show independent and analytical thinking in relation to knowledge of the history and/or modern presence of race and racism
  • Reflect on how race and racism intersect with other dimensions of identity and inequality
  • Apply your learning in relation to specific case studies and an overarching context of social justice
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at reasons for the collapse of the Soviet Union and the post-soviet period and the transition in Russia. You'll also analyse the transition in former Soviet states in the Caucasus, Central Asia, Ukraine and Belarus through core themes such as ethnicity, identity, historical memory, security and relations with the West.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the operation of the Soviet system and assess the relevance of key theoretical models
  • Critically assess the reasons for the collapse of the Soviet Union and the problems of transition
  • Compare and contrast the role of important factors such as elites, ethnicity, identity, economic development, security in shaping the post-soviet transition
  • Explain the role of core determinants of the relationship between Russia and the former Soviet states and their relationship with the West
  • Critically account for and assess the extent of democratisation in Russia and the former Soviet states
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

Framed by the ideas of the Atlantic world, you’ll explore the space created by the peoples who inhabited Europe, Africa, and the Americas where peoples, goods, and ideas were exchanged across national and imperial borders.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore various core topics in the history of race and slavery in the Atlantic World
  • Evaluate the historiography of slavery and antislavery in the Atlantic world
  • Critically examine the nature and basis of primary evidence
  • Write effectively using appropriate academic norms and conventions
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also look at how society has to adapt to many points of resistance in the configuration of power.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the key causes of social divisions in capitalist democracies
  • Recognise the mechanisms of persuasion that maintain these divisions
  • Evaluate political violence as a historical outcome of failure by the elites to maintain social control
  • Analyse and evaluate the use of ideology in how social control and resistance to elites, are maintained
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment (90% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in a study relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, initiative, independence and performance
  • Critically reflect on the formal learning experience and student ambassadorial role for the University, and consider the relevance of this learning to future study and/or employability and personal development
  • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your undergraduate course within the global context
Teaching activities
  • 5 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 595 hours abroad
Independent study time

n/a

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

Using material evidence (objects, buildings, landscapes and others) as a starting point, you’ll examine new ways of interrogating existing historiographical questions that include the relationship between private and public in the early modern and modern world, the emergence of a culture of consumerism in Europe (and when this happened), the analysis of encounters and the interactions that formed part of the European colonial projects in the modern world. You’ll use an interdisciplinary approach and draw on a variety of new areas in the study of the methods of historians, including the history of the emotions.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explore debates about the use of material culture by historians
  • Assess how the use of material culture might help to challenge older historical narratives
  • Apply theoretical and methodological approaches to specific objects/artefacts
  • Conduct focused reading and research on particular examples of material culture, and communicate findings effectively
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll study how behaviours now considered private or medical such as sexual incontinency were formerly monitored and controlled, the role of religious ideas and the participation of neighbours,  and you'll examine changes to criminal justice from when corporal, capital punishment and torture were considered acceptable to the eighteenth-century 'bloody code', to the enlightenment ideas of punishment and modern policing. You’ll also explore the impact of urbanisation on patterns of crime and anxieties surrounding it and the use of criminal prosecution as a means of social control, in relation to enforcing gender-roles and controlling the poor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate a variety of sources relating to and appraise different aspects of the history of crime
  • Assess methods of social control used at different periods of time, and the extent to which these were challenged
  • Differentiate between different historiographical approaches and arguments in the history of crime
  • Review how legal records can be used as a primary source for the understanding of social history
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

Optional sandwich year

Optional modules

What you'll do

Your placement year will be assessed after a period of no less than 30 weeks, on a pass/fail basis.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on the skills needed in a placement environment
  • Identify and evaluate your learning experience and the relevance of this to future careers and professional development
  • Identify areas for improvement or further training in your professional development
  • Evaluate your success in meeting the objectives identified in your learning agreement
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1,125 hours on placement
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll put together your own personal, independent research which can take many forms depending on the aims and focus of the dissertation/major project. You’ll complete this significant and individual piece of work over an extended period of time using self-managed learning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design a viable dissertation/project proposal
  • Use current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Deploy established and relevant techniques of analysis and enquiry in an ethical framework to a specific and focused area relevant to history
  • Critically evaluate assumptions, arguments and data (which may be incomplete) to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Manage and reflect on your learning and communicate in writing to a specified audience relevant to the academic or workplace community
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 390 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 9,000-word dissertation (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

Through a series of voluntary round-tables, visiting speakers, student symposia, tutor-led sessions, and professional-practice training: The academic enrichment programme engages you with contemporary events and issues, and emerging agendas, in order to remain a vibrant and relevant module. The programme is an inclusive environment which brings you together with other students from different degrees and disciplines.

Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll discuss and apply core theories of authoritarianism and democracy and the factors that promote democratic consolidation and authoritarianism, looking at them from contrasting regions and countries. You’ll also examine alternative themes and compare them, such as the way that human rights, media, religion and identity are affected by authoritarian systems and democracies, and you'll explore variations in the nature and responses to threats and challenges such as terrorism populist movements and protest.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate competing theories of democratic consolidation and authoritarianism
  • Compare and contrast the role of procedural and substantive conditions in determining the success of democratic consolidation and the maintenance of authoritarianism
  • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of competing explanations of democratisation and authoritarianism through an in-depth study of one country or region, taken from the late twentieth or early twenty-first centuries
  • Critically examine the relationship between democracy and authoritarianism and factors such as religion, identity media and political culture
  • Assess the resilience and response of democratic and authoritarian systems to challenges and threats such as terrorism, populism, protest, corruption and economic problems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word practical skill assessment (10% of final mark)
  • a 3000-word coursework report (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at contemporary social movements that have envisioned and enacted an end to oppression, and the relationship between social justice and education. You'll also be encouraged to develop your own political framework for challenging oppression.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate one key concept explored on the module, describing how it has been employed as a political framework for dismantling oppression
  • Examine key debates related to at least one social justice issue, demonstrating awareness of the interlocking nature of different structures of oppression
  • Reflect on how structures of oppression relate to your own life and experiences, as part of developing your own political framework for challenging oppression
  • Critically reflect on the relationship between education, knowledge production and social (in)justice
  • Plan and manage self-directed and independent learning
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll organise your own programme of learning activities to total at least 80 hours, supported by faculty-led workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on your learning and experience to date and use this to organise suitable work experience
  • Propose a programme of learning that will demonstrate and develop your employability skills
  • Critically evaluate your learning and experience and relate this to your future career goals
  • Use reflective practice to communicate the results of your experience
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 80-hours of work-based learning
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

In this module, you’ll examine utopian ideas, ideologies, and practices as a basis for engaging critically with the idea of human progress at the beginning of a new millennium.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate awareness of a variety of sources, identify and appraise different strands of utopian and dystopian political thought
  • Compare and reflect critically on different ideas about human progress and the difficulties of pursuing utopias under conditions of complexity and uncertainty
  • Creatively apply relevant aspects of utopian and dystopian thought to contemporary political issues across local, national and global contexts
  • Assess the insights and limits of utopian and dystopian thought in relation to how societies understand and address the challenges facing humanity in the twenty-first century
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 5 hours of supervised time in a studio/workshop
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on the everyday, intimate and embodied boundaries of nation-states, and how these shape our lives. You'll discuss questions relating to the relationship between nationalism and attitudes towards immigration.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically and reflectively engage with literature exploring nationalism from various disciplines
  • Analyse current political and economic debates surrounding immigration
  • Evaluate how global inequalities relate to nationalist social and political structures and ideologies
  • Demonstrate an understanding of how the issues discussed are relevant at micro and macro levels globally
  • Understand and critically question how nationalism and national identities are often taken for granted in Western societies, and how this relates to contemporary global power relations
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

Grassroot political activist movements have grown fast and now international non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are increasingly visible advocates in various policy areas as well as important service providers, particularly in fragile and post-conflict states. This module encourages you to reflect on the legitimacy and accountability of NGOs and social movements, and consider the political consequences of their activism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the accountability of core civil society actors
  • Critically evaluate the composition, competencies and influence of core civil society actors
  • Critically engage with debates on the potential and challenges of civil society activism
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 178 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 750-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll analyse employer expectations and apply your findings to refine your professional profile. You'll also prepare a job application pack, and take part in a mock interview as both a candidate and a recruiter and/or assessor.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate your personal professional profile and relate it to the development of effective job application strategies
  • Research and critically evaluate employers' expectations of a candidates' skills, attributes and competences in different sector
  • Evaluate your scores from various Psychometric tests to prepare for an employment assessment
  • Professionally communicate the outcomes of your experience to potential employers by producing a CV, statement, video pitch and a mock and formal job interview
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word coursework report (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word practical skills assessment (65% of final mark)

What you'll do

From a conceptual perspective, you’ll examine new debates in security studies and critically examine the enduring relevance of strategic thought in the face of contemporary challenges. You'll also explore contemporary events and issues, analysing the modes and causes of contemporary global threats and the options and responses of those tasked to deal with them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the underlying causes and implications of contemporary security challenges
  • Critically review perspectives on the strategic options for managing these issues
  • (Re)appraise the use of traditional strategic concepts with respect to new forms of global (in)security
  • Demonstrate independent thought with respect to novel solutions to global (in)security concerns
  • Effectively communicate research findings for academic or professional audiences
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 1 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 175 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

The topics will be driven by your deep engagement, working in groups, with both the historiography and primary sources relevant to the topic.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and assess the various historical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history
  • Conduct intensive critical work on primary source documentation
  • Explore the relationship between primary and secondary source materials
  • Engage with the methodological and interpretive issues in the historiographical theme identified
  • Individually or within a group context, build upon prior research and construct a coherent presentation in the chosen subject area
  • Demonstrate intellectual, transferable and employability skills appropriate to the field of history
Teaching activities
  • 3 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 3-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

The topics will be driven specifically by your engagement, working in groups, with both the historical debates and primary sources relevant to the topic.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and assess the various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history
  • Conduct intensive critical work on primary source documentation
  • Explore the relationship between primary and secondary source materials
  • Engage with the methodological and interpretive issues in the historiographical theme identified
  • Individually or within a group context, build upon research already gleaned and construct a coherent presentation in the chosen subject area
  • Demonstrate intellectual, transferable and employability skills appropriate to the field of history
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 16 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in individual research and reflection as well as in group discussions. Your research will be driven by your engagement with primary sources relevant to the topic, and this in-depth engagement with a specific topic will allow you to form your own conclusions. You'll develop skills from your first and second years in handling primary and secondary sources, synthesising materials, developing arguments and presenting responses in a variety of formats to particular debates between historians.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Undertake intensive critical work on primary sources relating to a strand of specialist history
  • Analyse and critically evaluate various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history
  • Construct and present arguments effectively and persuasively in a range of appropriate formats
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll take part in individual research and reflection as well as in group discussions. Your research will be driven by your engagement with primary sources relevant to the topic, and this in-depth engagement with a specific topic will allow you to form your own conclusions. You'll develop skills from your first and second years in handling primary and secondary sources, synthesising materials, developing arguments and presenting responses in a variety of formats to particular debates between historians.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Undertake intensive critical work on primary sources relating to a strand of specialist history
  • Analyse and critically evaluate various historiographical approaches to the study of a strand of specialist history
  • Construct and present arguments effectively and persuasively in a range of appropriate formats
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 3-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word written assignment including essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of the changing character of contemporary wars, structural and everyday violence, as well as gender and sexualised violence. You'll also explore militarist culture and entertainment, genocide and ethic cleansing, violence and the body.  

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and summarise key concerns, theories and debates in the sociology of violence and war
  • Show an understanding of empirical cases of collective violence using sociologically informed analysis
  • Compare, contrast and evaluate diverse analytical accounts of contemporary violence and war
  • Critique and defend arguments and perspectives in analytic accounts of contemporary violence and war
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word written essay (90% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • close textual analysis
  • group and individual presentations
  • a dissertation

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 8% by written exams, 10% by practical exams and 82% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 22% by practical exams and 78% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 24% by practical exams and 76% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

This course allows you to take the Learning From Experience (LiFE) option. This means you can earn credits towards your degree for work, volunteer and research placements that you do alongside your study.

Richard's story
"Portsmouth has definitely given me the tools I need to achieve..."

Find out what Richard loves about studying a BA (Hons) History degree at Portsmouth, and where he hopes this will take him next.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • workshops
  • seminars
  • one-on-one tutorials

There's an emphasis on learning the skills to conduct your own research, follow your own initiative, and confidently present your ideas.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Law and Business degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 15 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your History degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, independent reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next scheduled meeting.

Learning Development Tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty Learning Development Tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BA (Hons) History degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 96-112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, to include History or another relevant subject.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What skills and qualities do I need for this history degree course?

As well as meeting the entry requirements for this course and having an interest in the past, the skills and abilities you'll need for this course include:

  • the ability to read and evaluate different types of information
  • good writing skills
  • an interest in people and what might motivate them
  • a willingness to combine imagination with careful examination of evidence

You'll develop these skills further on the course.

How can I prepare for a history degree?

To prepare yourself for starting this degree, read widely, focusing on historical topics from around 1450–2000.

Also look at our social media presence, especially our blog, to find out more about ongoing teaching and research activities.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

For optional placements or placements abroad, you may need to pay additional costs, such as travel costs. These costs will vary depending on the location and duration of the placement. They'll range from £50 to £1000.

Common questions about this subject

Can't find the answer to your questions about this course or anything else about undergraduate life? Contact us

Common history questions

History is:

  • the study of past people, societies and events
  • the consideration of change and continuity across time
  • the study of how past developments impact on the present

When we understand the past in all its variety and controversy, we can understand how it impacts on the present, and how it can help to shape the future.

Because of the transferable skills you'll develop, a history degree is highly valued by employers across all sectors.

For example, history graduates have strong critical and imaginative thinking skills, are good communicators and are able to employ an analytical approach. These are all skills needed in future job markets.

A history degree allows you to apply your passion for the past in many different job roles and career paths.

It can lead to exciting and rewarding careers where you can find out where we came from and think about how past developments have shaped present day society.

You can also use the skills you develop as a historian in areas not directly connected to history.

History helps us understand what it is to be human. It develops an understanding of the importance of the contexts in which people act and change happens, and encourages you to think about the specific and the bigger picture.

Historians are excellent researchers, critical thinkers, communicators and arguers.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – V100
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:
  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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