Media studies student on Mac computer
UCAS Code
P300
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

Are you interested in how the media works and influences individuals and societies, from newspapers and television to social networks?

This BA (Hons) Media Studies degree course gives you the knowledge and skills to dissect and discuss the media at an academic level, and put what you learn into mastering media content of your own.

When you graduate, you'll be well set to begin your media career in areas such as journalism, marketing, or publishing, but you'll also have creative and transferable skills that you can put to work in any industry.

93% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

What you'll experience

On this Media Studies degree course you'll:

  • Undertake an analytical review of the global media of our times, and how they reflect and shape our society
  • Explore entertainment and identity in the media
  • Study the impact of changing forms of communication from the past and present – and the possibilities for the future
  • Benefit from the opportunity to study the practical and technical skills involved in media production, using our top spec TV production facilities
  • Work with local and national media companies
  • Learn from widely published media experts
  • Enjoy the chance to study abroad at one of our partner institutions, such as the renowned University of Zaragoza in Spain
  • Have the option to take a placement year in the industry to expand your knowledge and experience even further before you graduate

Careers and opportunities

The communication, research, writing and critical thinking skills you learn on this media degree will be valuable to employers in any industry.

What can you do with a media studies degree?

Previous media studies graduates have gone on to work in areas such as:

  • media research
  • public relations and marketing
  • journalism
  • publishing
  • new media development

You could also continue your studies at postgraduate level or set up a business with help and support from the University.

What jobs can you do with a media studies degree?

Some of our media studies alumni have gone on to work for big names such as the BBC, Warner Bros and Universal Pictures International. Job roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • production manager
  • sound and vision engineer
  • film/video producer
  • advertising journalist
  • assistant publicist
  • PR and communications officer

When you finish the course, our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job in the industry, and will give you help and advice for up to 5 years, as you advance in your career.

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) Media Studies degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of theoretical models of media to analyse current media events such as news, reality, sports and war.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand media events that take place across interrelated platforms (such as print media, radio, TV, film and internet)
  • Evaluate how media audiences select, produce, distribute and consume social and political meanings
  • Identify how contemporary media events and institutions can be aligned to political strategies and agendas
  • Use technology when reporting media events
  • Demonstrate research skills through presentation in written forms
  • Understand the production, circulation and consumption of media events
  • Reflect on your writing and researching practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and seminars.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 150 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also explore how target readerships and context inform the style, structure and presentation of written media journalism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast different modes of writing
  • Write clearly and concisely
  • Use a variety of materials in the production of media writing
  • Understand various media and cultural products
  • Understand target readerships and working towards fixed deadlines
  • Reflect upon your personal writing progress
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars, tutorials and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 138 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,000-word essays (25% of final mark, each)
  • a 1,500-word portfolio of reviews (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also explore the critical study of genres and the field of adaptation studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe basic critical approaches to film authorship
  • Indicate the importance of dominant genres to modern film culture
  • Understand a range of adaptation processes
  • Detail some of the industrial and cultural constraints on film authorship
  • Apply close reading to printed and visual texts
  • Demonstrate skills of spoken presentation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend a weekly 2-hour lectures featuring clips and lecture discussions, and a weekly 1-hour seminar to discuss ideas and key readings, and to complete seminar tasks. You'll also have access to in-class preparation sessions for assessments and one-to-one tutorials for essay assessments.

You'll be supplied with online resources such as lecture materials, supportive learning materials, the reading list, suggested film texts and other materials. You'll be able to contact module lecturers in their office hours and via email.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 4 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment: group presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the strengths and weaknesses of each approach, through case studies and practical application.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and define relevant theories, historical knowledge and methods of analysis
  • Apply appropriate theories, historical knowledge and methods of analysis to media texts
  • Use various primary sources and secondary texts in research
  • Work independently on written assessments
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and seminars.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 4 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word essay (30% of final mark)
  • 2x 1,000-word essay (35% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of conducting and using extensive research on a variety of media examples and contexts at undergraduate level.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand academic standards and concepts
  • Identify, extract and employ relevant information from appropriate sources
  • Apply generic and specific research/study techniques to the production of assessed work
  • Develop an independent research project to a final group presentation and portfolio essay
  • Use Harvard (APA) academic style in written assessments
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word essay (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop the capacity to produce and understand, and to stimulate an informed understanding of these practices that will underpin further critical and creative work and industry practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and apply practically audio-visual processes and skills in a range of media
  • Work collaboratively on specific audio-visual projects, demonstrating organisational skills
  • Demonstrate the ability to develop and design narratives, images and sequences that function within existing recognised formal systems
  • Reflect on their own creative and organisational work and understand how to develop that in future projects and modules
  • Produce effective and clear narrative project in and audio visual forms
  • Work within established procedures to produce a film within health and safety requirements
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This in on top of the 44 hours of scheduled teaching activities making the 200 hours expected for this 20 credit module. This is around 5 hours of independent study time a week over the duration of the module. Independent work, research and group project development and production are key to this unit.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • an individual project proposal (20% of final mark)
  • an individual pre-production portfolio including visual preparation and planning (40% of final mark)
  • a group project final short film and production paperwork portfolio (40% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll examine examples from various media forms (such as magazines, books, television, film, digital and social media).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Engage with and use a range of critical discussions
  • Analyse contemporary and historical media sources, of significance to diverse representations of gender
  • Identify, discuss and analyse media interventions in gender representation
  • Critically discuss the prevalence and significance of gender representation in the media
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 2,500-word essay (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll engage with a range of case studies from specific time periods to get an understanding of the techniques used in various countries to control the flow of information.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Comprehend the history and contemporary use of propaganda
  • Identify specific examples of propaganda such as advertising as propaganda, war reporting as propaganda
  • Analyse how propaganda is used to reinforce the ideologies of state, nationalism and capitalism
  • Critically interrogate how the image and visual culture serve a propagandist function in mass mediated society
  • Appraise the different dimensions of power, the role of the media and the function of propaganda in society (social control)
  • Critically analyse different accounts of media power and propaganda in terms of its impact upon public policy-making
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-words practical coursework projects (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll also explore society's engagement with popular screen media.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply theoretical and critical approaches to screen media studies
  • Critically identify, select and engage with online resources
  • Use best practice when researching
  • Understand the historical and chronological social context of screen media
  • Combine practice with theory in screen media studies
  • Understand the economic impact of the screen on the creative leisure and entertainment industry
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,000 word essay (80% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
  • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
  • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine the claim that new communication channels and cross-media platforms inspire social networking, user generated content, and digital culture.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify key theories on digital cultures and the networked society
  • Discuss cross-platform skills and content in online culture
  • Identify reliable and appropriate digital sources for personal research
  • Understand online social interaction and its implications
  • Recognise skills that make you attractive to employers through engagement with cross-platform 'polymedia'
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 2,000-word essay (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand key approaches to the study of mass media, culture and national identity
  • Analyse cultural industries and media in their national, historical and socio-cultural context
  • Develop, define and complete a personal research project on the media and national identity
  • Use various research sources for an extended research project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes, seminars and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word critical review essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate equipment and techniques to develop a video-based project, using the relevant health and safety policies and procedures
  • Collaborate effectively with group members and contribute to team projects
  • Use time management skills to complete tasks within allotted schedules
  • Demonstrate a reflective understanding of the interrelation of theory and practice within your own work, and the work of other practitioners
  • Demonstrate advanced audio-visual literacy and camera skills
  • Use post-production skills to inform your appreciation of film and video
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use appropriate equipment and techniques to develop a video-based project, using the relevant health and safety policies and procedures
  • Collaborate effectively with group members and contribute to team projects
  • Use time management skills to complete tasks within allotted schedules
  • Demonstrate a reflective understanding of the interrelation of theory and practice within your own work and the work of other practitioners
  • Demonstrate an understanding of film grammar and narrative
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify future career goals and reflect on these to develop a personal development plan (programme of learning), which includes suitable work experience and skills/knowledge development opportunities
  • Arrange suitable work experience, engage with personal development opportunities and analyse relevant literature relating to enhancing your employment opportunities
  • Critically evaluate and articulate your learning (knowledge, skills and attributes) in relation to your future career goals
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 188 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

On this module you'll examine the production, reception and marketing of genre and its main categorisations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the role of genre as a categorisation
  • Explain the critical and economic considerations of media texts
  • Evaluate texts in institutional, historical and cultural contexts
  • Recognise and analyse the cultural relevance of genre in various media
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend weekly 2-hour lectures featuring clips, analysis exercises and lecture discussions, and 3 x 1-hour online seminars to to assist with assessment preparation. You'll also have access to one-on-one group tutorials to prepare for assessments.

You'll be supplied with online resources such as recordings, suggested materials, film and media texts, the reading list and other materials. You'll be able to contact module lecturers in their office hours and via email.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word academic poster or blog post on a horror media text of your choice (50% of final mark)

Before your assessments, guidance and informal assessment through drafting and feedback will be offered on an individual basis.

What you'll do

You'll cover topics such as pornography, body image, immigration, environmentalism, and more.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse the media representation of social issues
  • Discuss and debate social issues in the media
  • Apply historical and theoretical views to representations of social issues in the media
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2x 1,500-word essay (50% of final mark, each).

What you'll do

You'll look at the global representation of sport, with a focus on the UK and the US.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use different methods and concepts to analyse the representation of sport in media
  • Identify issues related to the relationship between sport and media in historical, economic and cultural circumstances
  • Understand various approaches to the study of sport and the media
  • Reflect on your own methods of study, learning and application
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on your effectiveness at tasks that use employability skills such as project planning, communication, time management, leadership and teamwork
  • Evaluate the theory and complete the practice of establishing and running a business enterprise
  • Understand the systems commonly used to plan, record and monitor business decisions and company transactions
  • Critically reflect on the factors that contribute towards the success or failure of business start ups
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 2,000 word report (50% of your final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of your final mark)

What you'll do

The cross disciplinary nature of this module equips you with employability skills required by creative transmedia industries. You'll develop practical approaches and team work skills, combined with theoretical underpinning, to develop your own transmedia franchise.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically examine commercial and grassroots texts that contribute to larger media franchises (mobisodes and webisodes, comics, games)
  • Trace the historical context from which modern transmedia practices emerge
  • Understand the processes of transmedia narrative structures
  • Develop and pitch transmedia strategies around an existing or proposed media property in a team
  • Conduct, apportion and complete research within planning processes
  • Successfully execute a student proposed transmedia project
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 13 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 hours of demonstration
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (70% of final mark)

Year 3

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of research and writing skills. You'll also receive ten hours of one-to-one tutorial support.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use analysis and enquiry techniques within an ethical framework
  • Critically evaluate theories and data to form a judgement, frame further questions and identify potential solutions
  • Use current research or equivalent advanced scholarship in the relevant field
  • Manage your own learning
  • Communicate in writing to a specialist audience
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 386 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000 word essay (10% of final mark)
  • a 9,000 word dissertation (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn how to create a video to industry standards and requirements.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work as part of a team to produce practical projects
  • Research and develop appropriate skills for a chosen production role
  • Apply time, scheduling, project and resource management skills to practical projects
  • Complete projects to a predetermined schedule
  • Apply knowledge of equipment, techniques and resources to the production of video
  • Work in a professional manner that follows industry practices
  • Understand the connection between film and media theory and production practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and supervised workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 320 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a project (50% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of four main modes of consumption, and how the media presents them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and apply critical discussions around the field of consumption
  • Analyse primary media sources that are significant to consumption and lifestyle
  • Identify, discuss and analyse media interventions in consumption
  • Critically discuss the pervasiveness and significance of consumption and lifestyle media
Teaching activities

12 x 2-hour lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 3,000-word essay (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll also learn to consider the theoretical and methodological development of audience research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate theoretical approaches to the study of audiences and fans
  • Analyse the social, cultural and economic premises and consequences of media fandom across different texts and their contexts
  • Show an understanding of various discrete practices of media fan communities
  • Research and defend a theoretical position related to media fan cultures and their practices
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, supervised workshops (focused on the assessments) and seminars (to prepare for the assessments).

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll critically examine the responsibility of journalists in conflict situations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically engage with debates and theories about the relationship between news, war and peace
  • Assess and analyse arguments about the news media's role in reporting war and peace
  • Evaluate critical positions taken towards the news media's reporting of war and peace
  • Apply knowledge gained on the module to self-directed research
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 4,000-word essay (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You’ll focus on the distinction between 'factual' and 'fictional' science, and draw on history and theory to examine how science, technology and the figure of the scientist have been represented in a variety of media forms. These include literature, cinema, television, advertising, new media and journalism.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss the role of the mass media in our understanding of the world, including the consequences and effects of social and technological change on that media and understanding
  • Evaluate diverse representations of mediated science and technology in a variety of institutional, cultural and historical contexts
  • Recognise and critique the wider social and cultural relevance of science and technology, as well as the implications of its mass mediation, in contemporary society
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your knowledge of research methods for both visual and written sources.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate animation styles, designs and the visual practices commonly associated with familiar animated texts
  • Apply various codes and visual practices to a variety of animation styles
  • Evaluate agency, authorship, national and industrial factors in animation
  • Demonstrate the use of both primary and secondary arguments for a written piece of work
  • Review your own methods, learning process and application of research
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend 4-hour sessions in lecture rooms per week. In these sessions you'll participate in reflective and interactive exercises that will feed into written assessments.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word portfolio (10% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word essay (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll look at these ideas from political, philosophical and ethical positions.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Engage with key debates and theories on modern comedy history and theory
  • Demonstrate the use of both primary and secondary arguments for a written piece of work
  • Evaluate agency and authorship, as well as national and industrial factors in comedy
  • Approach the study of comedy from national, political, social and cultural contexts
  • Use different academic views in the analysis of comedy
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend small group lectures. These will incorporate reflective and interactive exercises that will inform your assessments.

You'll be supplied with online resources such as recordings, suggested materials, film and media texts, the reading list and other materials. You'll be able to contact module lecturers in their office hours and via email.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (10% of final mark)
  • a 3,000 word essay (90% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll combine textual, theoretical and historical analysis to the study of British television drama.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply analytical approaches to TV drama texts
  • Evaluate critical arguments about TV drama
  • Analyse various industrial and historical contexts of British TV drama
  • Analyse stylistic conventions of TV drama
  • Discuss the treatment of sociopolitical themes in TV drama
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2 x 1,500-word essays (50% of final mark, each).

What you'll do

You'll focus on 'late night' celebrity talk shows and 'daytime' issue-orientated talk shows.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply your understanding of theoretical approaches to the study of TV talk shows
  • Use various methodologies and concepts to analyse TV texts
  • Evaluate issues that govern the relationship between TV production and reception
  • Critically evaluate related historical, economic and cultural issues
  • Review your own methods, learning processes and the application of what you've learned
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word essay (45% of final mark)
  • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (45% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • presentations
  • scripts
  • video productions
  • programme proposal/pitch
  • reviews and features
  • reports/magazine features
  • examinations
  • dissertation/project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 20% by practical exams and 80% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 12% by practical exams and 88% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 13% by practical exams and 87% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the media industry. We'll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You'll have access to Creative Careers, a team within the faculty helping students to find placement opportunities within the creative industries. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, help with your job search, including applications and interviews, and support throughout your placement, should you need it.

Previous students have been on placements to NBC Universal, Disney, and St James Place Wealth Management.

In your placement year, you can also set up a business on your own or with other students.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate from your media degree, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

Teaching

Teaching activities on this course include:

  • workshops
  • seminars
  • lectures
  • practical performance sessions
  • simulation

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your media studies degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as workshops, lectures and seminars for about 15 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which options you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You’ll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

Student support advisor

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

Academic skills tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Creative skills tutors

If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.

IT and computing support

Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BA (Hons) Media Studies degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 104-112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You may need to buy items such as DVDs and MiniDV tapes to use on practical units, which cost approximately £20–£30.

You’ll need to cover the material costs for individual project work, which usually costs £50–£100.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – P300
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:
  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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