a mechanical engineering student adjusts the steering wheel in a formula student racing car
UCAS Code
H300
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Recent years have seen huge advances in technology for transport, healthcare and robotics. If you enjoy getting stuck into technology projects and love finding practical solutions to problems, this BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree course is the perfect choice for you.

To meet the challenges of the engineering world, you'll study the design, development, manufacture, installation, operation and maintenance of engineered products. You'll get to specialise in advanced subjects such as sustainable development and computer-aided engineering and have the option to get involved in UP Racing - the University's Formula Student team.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) meeting in full the academic requirement for IEng (Incorporated Engineer) and in part the academic requirement for CEng (Chartered Engineer).

95% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this course you'll:

  • Learn about the underlying elements of successful engineering and manufacturing projects, including solid mechanics and dynamics, and engineering design
  • Use our CAD and rapid prototyping suites, energy systems lab, stress analysis lab, and metrology and 3D scanning microscopy facilities
  • Get the chance to be involved in Formula Student, where you'll design, construct and test a competitive race car with fellow students
  • Put your skills to the test by building your own products in our manufacturing workshops
  • Have to option to expand your learning and meet potential employers by working on an industrial project

Take tour of our engineering labs

Take a virtual tour around our engineering facilities, or check out one of our labs, below.

Take a tour

Careers and opportunities

There's currently a shortage of talented engineers in the UK and abroad, so there will be many opportunities open to you when you graduate.

What can you do with a Mechanical Engineering degree?

Previous graduates have gone on to work in areas including:

  • design
  • research and development
  • product manufacture
  • project management

What jobs can you do with a Mechanical Engineering degree?

Graduates from this course have gone on to work as:

  • mechanical engineer
  • product design engineer
  • aerospace engineer
  • application engineer

Other graduates have continued their studies at postgraduate level or set up successful businesses with help and support from the University.

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

What you'll study on this BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Model and predict the performance of simple circuits containing active and passive devices, explain the operation of a range of active devices and analyse simple R, C and L combinations in alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) circuits
  • Explain basic electromagnetic phenomena qualitatively, perform calculations on linear circuits and explain the operation of and perform simple calculations on electrical machines
  • Explain the operation of basic logic elements
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 144 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute written exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore all important graphic communication starting with hand drawings to British standards, continuing with 2D computer aided design.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Communicate technical information via manual and computer aided techniques with sketches, detail and assembly drawings
  • Use design tools to produce a conceptual mode
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.""

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour exam (50% of final mark)
  • a coursework project (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and analyse a range of fundamental concepts in the field of fluid mechanics and thermodynamics
  • Perform calculations to analyse simple physical systems using these concepts
  • Apply this knowledge to various engineering scenarios and problems
  • Apply these concepts to practical applications
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 2-hour practical classes and tutorials
  • 24 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 122 hours studying independently. This is around 7.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (80% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll examine the classification, evaluation, analysis, and selection of different materials and their fabrication techniques in the context of mechanical and manufacturing engineering.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of theories and underlying principles involved in engineering materials
  • Compare and contrast the properties, performances and limitations of different types of engineering materials
  • Select the most appropriate materials for engineering applications
  • Demonstrate an understanding of a wide range of conventional and advanced manufacturing techniques
  • Describe different manufacturing techniques, their capabilities and limitations
  • Describe how properties of engineering materials are influenced by manufacturing techniques and use
Teaching activities
  • 21 x 2-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 4 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 4 hours of guided independent study
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 146 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 50-minute written exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, and differential and partially differential equations

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, differential and partially differential equations
  • Demonstrate organisational and time-management skills
  • Apply routine mathematical methods
  • Critically analyse and solve mathematical problems applicable to engineering
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour practical and workshops
  • 23 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 108 hours studying independently. This is around 6.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 16-week coursework portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (80% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you’ll do

You’ll learn how to use the computer as an aid to engineering activities and advance your capabilities and economics of manufacture and how it relates to product design. You’ll also learn about product modelling and apply manufacturing simulation techniques in the production of a product.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Produce solid models of engineering components
  • Evaluate design proposals using structural finite element analysis to optimise solutions
  • Demonstrate the use of a computer aided engineering package for manufacturing systems
  • Generate appropriate data for computer numerically controlled machine tools, assembly robots and flexible manufacturing cells
  • Appraise machining constraints and economics in the development of components
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 3,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark).

What you’ll do

You’ll examine the conceptual design phase including analysis of needs, development of product design specification, exploration of alternative concepts and the selection of a concept that best meets goals of performance, time-scale, and feasibility. You’ll also look at detail design, the use of standard parts and standardisation for effective design.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and define a problem, through a specification, and demonstrate familiarity with sources of design information
  • Apply problem solving techniques to an open ended design problem
  • Make effective use of standard components in an engineering design
  • Demonstrate ability to utilise engineering design calculations to size features and components
  • Demonstrate ability to present design solutions to an audience
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll develop your ability to write MATLAB programmes and explore broader programming techniques needed to solve engineering problems.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate competence in recognising, defining and using the functions and techniques introduced in this module
  • Show ability to develop and assess mathematical models of physical processes
  • Demonstrate capability to select and apply appropriate techniques to obtain a robust solution of engineering problems
  • Demonstrate confident use of built-in MATLAB tools
  • Demonstrate a sound understanding of algorithms and ability to formulate and implement step-by-step solution of a specific engineering problem based on its mathematical model
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 11 x 3-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour written exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word portfolio project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your knowledge and expertise in solid mechanics and dynamics which is of vital importance in mechanical engineering. This module will further your problem solving, numeracy, analytical, technical and written communications skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and evaluate the principles within solid mechanics of multi-dimensional stress state, elastic limitation and instability
  • Apply the principles kinematic and kinetics to more complex mechanisms and evaluate the principles of epicyclic gear trains
  • Interpret how damping and force modelling can be applied to problems involving a single degree of freedom vibration and evaluate the vibration theory for more complex systems
  • Interpret the concept of strain energy method for solving static and dynamic problems
  • Apply the principles of elasticity to solve practical solid mechanics problems on components
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 148 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your knowledge of the second law of thermodynamics in order to critically analyse thermofluids plant and equipment.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

 

  • Use key principles flowing from the Second Law of Thermodynamics
  • Apply analytical and semi-empirical methods to combustion, fluid flow, heat transfer and energy conversion systems
  • Analyse the performance of thermofluid processes and cycles and identify core system variables
  • Apply the principles and concepts developed in the module by means of problem solving
  • Apply thermofluid concepts to practical applications
Teaching activities
  • 26 x 2-hour lectures
  • 4 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (25% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (75% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll get an introduction to the mathematical modelling of physical systems, the practical aspects of applying feedback control, and assess system performances using mathematical modelling of physical systems and assess system performance using mathematical models and experimental data. You'll also analyse the stability and performance of feedback control systems using root locus technique and frequency response methods.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Construct models of physical systems
  • Analyse dynamic system response using Laplace transform, time and frequency response
  • Use a CAE package to simulate the behaviour of dynamic systems and analyse the system time response
  • System Modelling using software tools
  • Assess system performance in time and frequency domain
  • Design simple control systems
Teaching activities
  • 4 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 10 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 148 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-hour written exam (70% of final mark)
  • 2 x 1,000-word coursework reports (15% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

No previous knowledge of programming is assumed. You'll learn techniques of program design alongside the Visual Basic (VB) and embedded systems programming languages.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design algorithms to solve problems
  • Apply the principles of writing program code using appropriate data types and control structures
  • Use appropriate programming techniques to build GUI interfaces to applications
  • Apply simulation for the programming of embedded systems
  • Apply the principles and concepts developed in the unit by means of problem solving
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of lectures
  • 23 hours of supervised time in studio/workshop
  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 5 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 150 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute written exam (20% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll focus your study on power plants, CHP systems, fluid flow and turbulence. To take his module, you need to take the Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics module in Year 2.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the principles of conservation to describe the motion of a fluid
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature of turbulent flows
  • Apply thermodynamic principles and critically analyse the performance of a thermal plant
  • Critically evaluate system design in relation to the development of thermal plant
  • Apply the principles and concepts developed in the unit by means of problem solving
Teaching activities

24 x 2-hour lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2 x 90-minute written exams (50% of final mark, each).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the theoretical bases of the Finite Element Formulation and apply the Finite Element formulation to relevant reference problems in solid mechanics
  • Classify and identify all the relevant parameters influencing the accuracy and the reliability of the numerical solution based on finite element analysis
  • Generate and compute a finite element analysis for a complex 3D problem on solid mechanics
  • Interpret and discuss the results of a finite element analysis for a complex 3D problem involving solid mechanics
  • Assess and characterize the reliability of the outcomes obtained from a finite element analysis
  • Produce a comprehensive report and prepare a rigorous discussion for a finite Element Analysis of an engineering problem focused on solid mechanics
Teaching activities
  • 16 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 hours of supervised time in a studio/workshop
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word portfolio project (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

Your project will come from an extensive list provided by academic staff, or suggested by yourself.

You'll develop planning and self-management techniques, as well as the skills for activities that require a solution, investigation or analysis.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Organise, plan and schedule a comprehensive task demonstrating competency in conducting research, design and/or development elucidating project management skills including time and resource constraints, as well as ability to work with technical uncertainty
  • Conduct a substantial problem-solving activity requiring measures of analysis, synthesis, creativity and decision-making reflecting technical skills gained through the chosen programme award
  • Reflect on the commercial, economic and social context of the project, including ethics in engineering, health and safety, environmental and commercial risk, sustainability and innovation, risk assessment and management.
  • Confidently present and communicate information by written report, visual display and orally illustrating competence in critical evaluation and thinking
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 hours of project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 382 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a 10,000-word portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll also learn about the technologies and innovations that might lead to improvements in industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, calculate and analyse the environmental improvement and economic benefits coming from the application of environmental management tools and methodologies
  • Critically analyse global environmental issues, as well as national and international responses
  • Apply sustainable development principles to the practice of engineering, the improvement of efficiency, and the development and implementation of innovations, to reduce the environmental impact of industrial production and processes
  • Review major environmental consequences arising from human activity, and discuss the responsibilities of technologists with regard to sustainable development and business processes such as competition and the need for leadership, ethics, quality and performance improvement
  • Critically evaluate materials (their selection, use and substitutes) and manufacturing processes for engineering materials, using life cycle analysis
  • Critically analyse, formulate and manage constraints in manufacturing operations due to legislation, hazard and risk
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 18 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll get a fundamental understanding and appreciation of advanced engineering materials (composites and alloys) and their applications to engineering design and assessments. This module will develop your problem solving, modelling, analysis, decision making, technical and written communications skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the nature and applications of composite materials
  • Characterise engineering alloys and evaluate their failure mechanisms
  • Demonstrate the basic theory describing the mechanical properties of reinforced composites (tensile, flexural, impact, fatigue, fracture toughness and creep)
  • Apply safe-life and damage tolerance approaches to engineering design and assessments
  • Analyse the technologies for the production of composite components
  • Criticise the interrelation between the design and manufacture of polymers and composites
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate, justify and apply engineering design approaches proven in industry to create good quality products
  • Appraise the influences of engineering design on manufacturability and quality of a product
  • Appraise the constraints on the designer, engineering standards, codes of good engineering design practice and achieving the quality
  • Identify, justify and apply methods for testing and improving the quality of a product to be manufactured in different production volumes
  • Demonstrate understanding and manage a variety of tools for quality control of an engineering product
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour tutorials
  • 2 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word portfolio project (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Formula Student has given me the confidence in my ability as an engineer, as components that I have designed were built and proven to withstand their environment.

Simon Hotchkiss, Mechanical Engineering Student

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • written examinations
  • coursework
  • practical tests
  • project work
  • presentations

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year one students: 84% by written exams and 16% by coursework
  • Year two students: 56% by written exams, 13% by practical exams and 31% by coursework
  • Year three students: 60% by written exams and 40% by coursework

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies.

Discover Formula Student

Harrison: I'm the vice-Team Leader this year for the Formula Student project UP Racing. 

Ryan: So the rewarding aspect is probably starting from scratch, so having a complete clean sheet - designing it fully then seeing it actually get implemented on the car, racing at Silverstone. 

So I got recommended through a friend, then you had to do an application process. Show that you're dedicated and want to be part of the team. 

Ryan: We're going to be getting involved into Silverstone this year and also Formula Student Netherlands, which is a great prospect for the team. 

Harrison: So we get to take the car all the way over to Amsterdam to the TT racing circuit, Assen. We get to compete there with loads of Netherlands teams as well as teams across Europe, India, Egypt. 

Tom: Very good learning experience. You develop a lot of maturity because you have to sort of really push yourself. 

Alex: I'm lucky enough to be a driver so I get to have a bit of fun in the car and see, you know seeing everyone's faces once the project is done - the feeling is immense and it's really great to get the car rolling on its own power. 

 

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials (personal and academic)
  • laboratory and project work
  • Computer-Aided Engineering (CAE) system activity
  • open access study

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Law and Business degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 15 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops for about 14 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

Laboratory support

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BEng (Hons) Mechanical Engineering degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 104-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from Mathematics, plus a relevant subject.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What skill and qualities do I need for this Mechanical Engineering degree course?

As well as meeting the course entry requirements, you need to have an interest in maths, physics, and design. An interest in how things work and how to improve systems and products is also useful.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,400 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

There may be occasional trips for which you will be asked to contribute £25 a trip.

Common questions about this subject

Can't find the answer to your questions about this course or anything else about undergraduate life? Contact us

Common mechanical engineering questions

Mechanical engineering involves the design, manufacture and maintenance of mechanical systems – from individual parts and small devices such as microscale sensors and inkjet printer nozzles to large systems such as spacecraft and machine tools.

Mechanical engineers take products from ideas to the marketplace using disciplines such as engineering, engineering mathematics and science.

Mechanical engineering is one of the world's most in demand engineering disciplines. Mechanical engineers can work in many industries and on many types of projects.

The number of jobs in mechanical engineering is expected to grow 3.8% from 2019 to 2023 according to Labour Marketing Information (LMI).

The world relies on mechanical engineering solutions, so you'll positively contribute to society when you graduate.

You'll also develop a versatile skillset including analytical, critical thinking and design skills, which makes you highly sought after and employable.

Both. You'll learn theoretical aspects and then apply what you've learnt in laboratory practicals.

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How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – H300
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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