Economics, Finance and Banking BSc (Econ) (Hons)

students using the bloomberg suite
UCAS Code
LN13
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2019, September 2020

Overview

If you have an interest in the banking industry and how financial markets work, this BSc (Econ) (Hons) Economics, Finance and Banking course is ideal.

You’ll get a thorough understanding of economics and learn apply it to the fields of finance and banking.

After the course, you'll be set for a career in investment banking, tax consultancy or risk management and your money-savvy knowledge will make you a valuable asset to any business.

This degree shares some first year elements with several other economics courses. This gives you the flexibility to transfer to another course if you develop an interest in a different subject area.

96% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

What you'll experience

On this degree course you'll:

  • Learn from active researchers, whose expertise on topics such as herding behaviour and anti-competitive practice in foreign exchange markets has helped shape our society and the economy
  • Get a foundation in economics with a focus on the world of finance, covering topics on money, banking and financial markets
  • Tailor your studies to focus on the topics that match your career ambitions
  • Get your hands on the latest econometric software, such as eViews
  • Analyse market movements and learn to make fast-paced investment decisions using our Bloomberg Suite, the trading platform used by professionals
  • Get the Bloomberg Certificate as part of your studies, demonstrating to future employers that you know your way around the Bloomberg Suite
  • Study at a university ranked in the top 15 in the country for Economics in the Guardian university guide 2018 league table
  • Develop your maths and statistics skills with support from our Maths Cafe team
  • Have the opportunity to study abroad through our links with overseas universities

Careers and opportunities

The skills you learn on this course are in high demand. When you complete the course, you’ll be prepared for work in areas such as commercial and investment banking, accounting, tax consultancy and risk management.

What jobs can you do with an Economics, Finance and Banking degree?

Previous students have secured positions in organisations including Merrill Lynch, JP Morgan and Barclays Corporate Banking in roles such as:

  • financial analyst
  • actuary
  • investment analyst
  • trader in financial assets
  • purchasing and acquisitions officer
  • econometrician

You'll receive help and support from our Employability and Careers service throughout your studies, and for 5 years after you graduate.

I enjoy the practical experiences and applications, including the use of the Bloomberg suites which aren’t offered at most other Universities, and the opportunity to earn qualifications outside of the degree programme. The guest speakers are also brilliant, providing real life examples and problems which we could face later on, it’s a welcome change to usual lectures on theory.

Robert Moss, BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking student

What you'll study on this BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Modules currently available

Core modules in this year include:

  • Microeconomics
  • Macroeconomics
  • Issues in Finance and Banking
  • Mathematics for Economics
  • Statistics for Economics
  • Business Accounting

There are no optional modules in this year.

Core modules in this year include:

  • Economics of Money, Banking and Financial Markets
  • Intermediate Macroeconomics
  • Intermediate Microeconomics
  • Econometric Methods
  • Data and Research Methods for Economics

Options to choose from in this year currently include:

  • International Economics
  • Financial Management
  • Managerial and Decision Economics
  • Behavioural Economics and Game Theory
  • Financial Management
  • Study Abroad (year long)

On this course, you can do an optional work placement year between your 2nd and 3rd years to get valuable experience working in industry.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your situation and ambitions. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Core modules in this year include:

  • International Banking and Financial Instruments
  • Financial Economics
  • Development Economics

Options to choose from in this year currently include:

  • Advanced Topics in Economics
  • Advanced Corporate Financial Management
  • Behavioural Finance and the Psychology of Investment
  • Industrial Organisation and Competition Policy
  • Development Economics
  • Econometric Analysis
  • Labour Economics
  • Public Sector Economics
  • Industrial Organisation and Competition Policy

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Placement year

After your second year, you’ll get the opportunity to take an optional placement year, working in an organisation to gain valuable experience and put your skills to work.

You’ll get mentoring and support throughout. We’ll help you find a placement that supports your interests and workplace ambitions.

Previous students have secured placements at:

Many students go on to work for their placement employer after the course.

Work experience and career planning

To help you secure a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course that'll develop your skills and build links in the industry.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and opportunities that will complement your studies and develop your abilities.

Since graduation, I have developed a career in financial advice. I joined a small business with a strong reputation within the industry for the quality of its service. The highly quantitative content within my degree course has had a significantly positive influence on my ability to work with numbers on a daily basis.

Rob May, BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking student

Learning support

As well as support by faculty teaching staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a mental or physical disability, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) can give you help, support and advice so you can reach your potential.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers free advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • workshops
  • tutorials
  • practical sessions

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who'll teach you on this course.

Alexis Stenfors, Senior Lecturer

Alexis joined the University to teach economics and finance subjects after an extensive career in the foreign exchange and interest rate derivatives markets, having been a trader at HSBC, Citi, Crédit Agricole and Merrill Lynch.

He is the author of ‘Barometer of Fear: An Insider’s Account of Rogue Trading and the Greatest Banking Scandal in History’, a book discussing his time in the finance industry.

 

Giorgio Bendoni, Teaching Fellow

Giorgio had a long career in the Navy before moving into managerial positions within the Aviation and Marine Industry and the Technology sector. He teaches on a variety of courses at undergraduate level including topics such as: Intermediate Microeconomics; Quantitative Economics; Economics of Money Banking and Financial Markets; International Banking and Financial Management.

 

Paul Lovejoy, Senior Teaching Fellow

Following an initial spell in the manufacturing industry, Paul spent most of his career in local and regional economic development: working a economist supporting regional venture capital funds, as a director of an international consultancy company and as a leader of economic development agencies.

He teaches macroeconomics, primarily to first year undergraduate students.

Graeme Chamberlain, Senior Teaching Fellow

Graeme is a macroeconomics expert. He has previously worked in the private sector for a boutique economics consultancy firm, and in the Government Economic Service at the Office for National Statistics and the Office for Budget Responsibility.

Adam Cox, Senior Lecturer

Adam leads engagement with local authorities and businesses, to develop ways of using economics to solve business and public policy problems. He specialises in teaching microeconomics to those who have not studied economics previously.

Pierre Fallier, Reader

Pierre's ongoing research into marine resources management has gained plaudits from around the world. He leads a number of high profile research projects, and specialises in teaching Development Economics.

How you'll spend your time

Each academic year is divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Most teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • analysis of topical case studies
  • written reports
  • examinations
  • essays
  • presentations
  • self-led independent study project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 62% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 34% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 62% by written exams and 38% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 37% by written exams and 63% by coursework

Entry requirements​

BSc (Econ) (Hons) Economics, Finance and Banking degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112-120 points from 3 A levels or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

Qualifications or experience
  • 112-120 points from 3 A levels or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2019 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £13,900 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 units a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each unit.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Apply

How to apply

To start in 2019 you need to apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – LN13
  • our institution code – P80

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

Not quite ready to apply?

Come to an Open Day to explore our course facilities, tour the campus and have a look around our halls of residence.

If you’re new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

To start in 2020 you need to apply through UCAS. You can start your application now and submit it from 4 September 2019.

In the meantime, sign up to an Open Day to explore our course facilities, tour the campus and have a look around our halls of residence.

If you’re new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

When you apply, you'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – LN13
  • our institution code – P80

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also apply directly to us or you can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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