Economics, Finance and Banking BSc (Econ) (Hons)

students using the bloomberg suite
UCAS Code
LN13
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020

Overview

If you have an interest in the banking industry and how financial markets work, this BSc (Econ) (Hons) Economics, Finance and Banking course is ideal.

You’ll get a thorough understanding of economics and learn apply it to the fields of finance and banking.

After the course, you'll be set for a career in investment banking, tax consultancy or risk management and your money-savvy knowledge will make you a valuable asset to any business.

This degree shares some first year elements with several other economics courses. This gives you the flexibility to transfer to another course if you develop an interest in a different subject area.

96% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

What you'll experience

On this degree course you'll:

  • Learn from active researchers, whose expertise on topics such as herding behaviour and anti-competitive practice in foreign exchange markets has helped shape our society and the economy
  • Get a foundation in economics with a focus on the world of finance, covering topics on money, banking and financial markets
  • Tailor your studies to focus on the topics that match your career ambitions
  • Get your hands on the latest econometric software, such as eViews
  • Analyse market movements and learn to make fast-paced investment decisions using our Bloomberg Suite, the trading platform used by professionals
  • Get the Bloomberg Certificate as part of your studies, demonstrating to future employers that you know your way around the Bloomberg Suite
  • Study at a university ranked in the top 15 in the country for Economics in the Guardian university guide 2018 league table
  • Develop your maths and statistics skills with support from our Maths Cafe team
  • Have the opportunity to study abroad through our links with overseas universities

Careers and opportunities

The skills you learn on this course are in high demand. When you complete the course, you’ll be prepared for work in areas such as commercial and investment banking, accounting, tax consultancy and risk management.

What jobs can you do with an Economics, Finance and Banking degree?

Previous students have secured positions in organisations including Merrill Lynch, JP Morgan and Barclays Corporate Banking in roles such as:

  • financial analyst
  • actuary
  • investment analyst
  • trader in financial assets
  • purchasing and acquisitions officer
  • econometrician

You'll receive help and support from our Employability and Careers service throughout your studies, and for 5 years after you graduate.

I enjoy the practical experiences and applications, including the use of the Bloomberg suites which aren’t offered at most other Universities, and the opportunity to earn qualifications outside of the degree programme. The guest speakers are also brilliant, providing real life examples and problems which we could face later on, it’s a welcome change to usual lectures on theory.

Robert Moss, BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking student

What you'll study on this BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll also use appropriate tools to analyse microeconomic issues.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify appropriate economic theories and interpret their uses, particularly in relation to the sustainable and socially optimal use of scarce resources
  • Review economic problems using logical and creative approaches involving skills of abstraction and simplification
  • Express findings orally or in writing
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also be introduced to the key concepts which are used to develop the macroeconomic models which make up the foundations of economic policy. You'll learn to work with tools to define and use macroeconomic frameworks.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify appropriate theories and interpret their uses in the context of the UK and global macroeconomies
  • Review economic problems using logical and creative approaches involving skills of abstraction and simplification
  • Understand the role played by central banks and other international regulatory bodies in establishing monetary policy
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret a range of mathematical functions and equations that are typically used by economists
  • Select and apply mathematical procedures to solve economic problems
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 48 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop the basic statistical skills needed in the study of econometrics and data analysis at levels 5 and 6.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Indicate how inferences about a population can be drawn from an analysis of sample data
  • Show an appreciation of the use of specific probability distributions
  • Construct a confidence interval and test a hypothesis in relation to a population parameter
  • Produce statistical results with the aid of an econometric software package
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
  • 24 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 500-word reports (20% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Prepare financial statements for sole traders and limited companies
  • Interpret the Annual Report of a company to analyse its performance
  • Discuss how the main financial principles and conventions impact accounting
  • Apply budgeting and the basic costing principles, concepts and cost classifications
  • Apply the financial techniques you learn to analytical and managerial problems
  • Explain the need for good corporate governance and social and ethical responsibility in business
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 1-hour lectures
  • 22 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2,000-words of reporting (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the extent to which economic theory can explain contemporary issues in finance and banking
  • Communicate complex economic ideas in ways that can be understood by non-specialist audiences
  • Examine the development of economic thought through a focus on key issues in economics
  • Undertake personal development planning and reflection
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of seminars
  • 24 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll reinforce your academic and study skills, and develop key employability skills. Depending on your degree pathway, your portfolio will link to either the Issues in Economics or Issues in Economics, Finance and Banking module.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on the skills and knowledge required to fulfil the Learning Outcomes and subject benchmark threshold standards at Level 4
  • Implement a Personal Development Plan to enhance personal, academic, and career achievements
  • Identify the qualities and skills that contribute to the employability of economics graduates
  • Develop the writing skills required to complete academic and employability tasks, such as essays, reports and covering letters
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of tutorials
  • 38 hours of guided independent study 
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do
You'll also learn about the role that a central banks' monetary policy and financial regulations play.
What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the structure, conduct and performance of banking and financial markets
  • Understand the role of financial regulation in the banking and financial sectors
  • Explain the analytical techniques for studying money, banking and financial markets
  • Assess the relative merits and limitations of analytical techniques for studying money, banking and financial markets
  • Translate real world economic problems into analytical models and vice versa
  • Employ appropriate analytical techniques to graphically and mathematically study money, banking and financial markets
  • Review academic literature relating to banking and finance in order to make policy recommendations
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll use your knowledge to identify the key challenges for policy matters and to review, discuss and critically evaluate analytical techniques for studying macroeconomic issues.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate and explain key variables in the UK and global macroeconomies, as well as their evolution over time and associated challenges for policymakers
  • Articulate and explain analytical techniques for studying macroeconomic issues
  • Assess the relative merits of the different monetary policy approaches adopted by central banks and other international regulatory authorities
  • Translate real-world macroeconomic problems into analytical models and vice versa and employ appropriate analytical techniques to graphically and mathematically study macroeoconomic issues
  • Communicate descriptions, analysis, and findings in a structured, clear, factual, and ethical manner
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop your understanding of essential numerical problem solving and graphing techniques.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate and explain core principles of microeconomic theory at an intermediate level, particularly in relation to the socially optimal allocation of scarce resources
  • Calculate solutions to numerical microeconomic problems using appropriate mathematical techniques
  • Demonstrate abstractions of microeconomic problems through the construction of appropriate diagrams
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word online test (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework exercise (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also achieve competence in using an econometric software package to estimate economic relationships.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply statistical concepts relating to probability theory and probability density functions
  • Outline/implement routine estimation and testing procedures
  • Interpret econometric results and to recognise when a regression model is incorrectly specified
  • Undertake an econometric analysis using professional conventions
  • Perform an analysis of data in time-limited conditions that mimic those faced in a professional working environment
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word portfolio (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also gain experience using online business information systems to complete independent research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and apply appropriate methods for the analysis of economic and financial data
  • Deliver an effective oral presentation
  • Develop policy recommendations in a specific area of economics
  • Review a sample of academic research
  • Prepare personal development planning materials to demonstrate key employability skills
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 3-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500 word report (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,000 word portfolio (0% of final mark)
  • a 1,500 word written assignment (40% of final mark)

What you’ll do

The portfolio links with the 'Data and Research Methods for Economics’ module.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Review and employ the skills and knowledge required to fulfil the learning outcomes and subject benchmark threshold standards at Level 5
  • Implement a personal development plan to enhance personal, academic and career achievements
  • Examine opportunities for industrial placements
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 18 hours of guided independent study
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 18 hours studying independently over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word portfolio (pass or fail)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll also get an understanding of how to use different trade instruments, with respect to economic development, ethical standards, and welfare.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Review academic literature relating to international economics in order to make policy recommendations
  • Assess the trading performance of the UK and other countries in the global economy
  • Identify and analyse different theoretical models of international economics in light of 'real world' situations and ethical considerations
  • Examine the linkages between international trade, currency and capital markets
  • Assess the impact of regional integration and multilateral trade arrangements
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word portfolio (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and illustrate the business finance environment and deal with integrated business finance problems
  • Evaluate and use financial statements to assess performance and valuing firms
  • Apply the principles and theories underpinning investment decisions, and apply capital budgeting techniques to decision making
  • Understand, discuss and analyse dividend policy in corporate financial management
  • Appraise and understand different sources of finance, including Islamic financial instruments
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the concepts of risk and return and portfolio theory, calculate risk and return on stocks and portfolios, and critically discuss factors affecting risk and return
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures (to introduce you to the principles of core theory)
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars (held weekly so you can do formative problem-solving activities)
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • set exercise (10% of final mark) – individual continuous assessment
  • a 2,000 word group report (20% of final mark)
  • a 150-minute exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll get an introduction to public policy towards private firms and organisations, among other topics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand issues relating to corporate social responsibility and how it might influence decision making within organisations
  • Review academic literature relating to managerial and decision economics in order to make policy recommendations
  • Compare and contrast different theories that managers use when making decisions in the firm and interpret their effectiveness in an international context
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 60-minute in-class exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll examine game theory in the context of economic research, and look into the effect of underlying human behaviour on economic situations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine the relevance and position of game theory in economic research
  • Differentiate between types of games and their uses in strategic thinking
  • Analyse different games and use a variety of tools to find equilibria
  • Contrast the approaches and predictions of standard economic versus behavioural models
  • Understand the underlying structures driving human behaviour in economic situations
  • Appraise appropriate methods to identify and study observed behavioural phenomena
Teaching activities
  • 4 hours of tutorials
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 148 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000 word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (75% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a broader knowledge and understanding of the subject specialism(s)
  • Reflect on your learning, strengths, weaknesses and performance in another country, in a different academic system
  • Use a wider range of transferable skills, based on what you learn from different culture and inter-cultural competencies
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll learn to outline the difficulties and opportunities of financial risk management and banking on an international scale. You'll also investigate comparative institutional and policy approaches to the regulation of international banking and financial markets.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the function and complexity of international banking and financial markets by addressing a realistic problem scenario
  • Organise and present appropriate data to frame a problem in the area of banking and finance and identify a solution
  • Understand the issues surrounding the effective regulation of financial systems
  • Implement strategies involving financial derivatives in measurement and management of financial risk, hedging, speculation, and arbitrage
  • Critically evaluate and demonstrate knowledge of the empirical research literature in the area
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also build an understanding of the key principles involved in the analysis of a firm's financial decisions.

What youlll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the major theories of financial economics, as well as their relevance and application to practical investment decisions
  • Deploy appropriate quantitative and modelling techniques, to understand central concepts in financial economics
  • Apply appropriate analytical methods to explore the relationships between financial and economic variables
  • Compare, contrast and critically evaluate the relevant empirical research literature
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll complete a personal development planning (PDP) portfolio, develop your key employability skills and reflect upon options for work, enterprise and/or further study after graduation.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Employ the skills and knowledge required to fulfil the learning outcomes and subject benchmark threshold standards at Level 6
  • Extend personal development planning to cover personal, academic and career goals after graduation
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 20 hours of guided independent study
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 20 hours studying independently over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word portfolio (pass/fail)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll develop an integrated understanding of the use of different instruments and policies with respect to economic development, ethical standards and welfare.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the historic economic development experiences of the developing world
  • Apply analysis in the context of contemporary economic thinking and models
  • Examine current economic strategies and policy initiatives that aim to enhance economic growth, reduce poverty and inequality, and promote sustainable resource use
  • Critically evaluate the suitability of development policies in different contexts
  • Apply economic techniques and evaluation methodologies when analysing contemporary problems facing the developing world
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 2-hour seminars
Assessment

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to: 

  • Apply theory and appropriate techniques to advanced corporate financial management issues including aspects of financial inclusion and responsible finance
  • Understand the link between contemporary issues in financial press and underlying strategic financial management topics, on an industry/individual company basis
  • Assess and produce group reports to management, addressing specific real-life strategic financial management scenarios
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop analytical skills in the application of theory and empirical research to financial management.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Articulate core concepts and principles of behavioural finance at final year undergraduate level
  • Critically discuss and evaluate relevant empirical research literature
  • Demonstrate competence in the application of theory and empirical research to long-term stock market investment decisions
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop an understanding of public policy towards private firms and organisations, as well as a critical awareness of the main economic instruments used for competition policy.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key theories and principles of industrial organisation
  • Apply appropriate methods to analyse a case relating to international competition policy, highlighting issues relating to fair competition between firms
  • Critically evaluate the implications of different industry structures and firm-level strategies on equality of market outcomes
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develop your skills in estimation, testing, and critical analysis in model formulation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret and critically assess econometric results presented in economics and finance research
  • Formulate, estimate, and test the adequacy of econometric analysis
  • Select and apply appropriate statistical approaches in order to undertake an analysis of economic data
  • Perform an econometric analysis to professional standards, under time-constrained conditions that would be typical of employment settings
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also compare and contrast competing theoretical models and policy stances, as well as critically evaluating contemporary debates on key issues such as unemployment, inflation, discrimination, and job searching.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conceptualise labour market behaviour using logical and creative approaches, including skills of abstraction and simplification
  • Analyse trends in labour markets and policy formation
  • Critically evaluate current policy-making, particularly in relation to equality and diversity in labour markets
  • Effectively present your findings, whether orally, or in written form
  • Summarise and report concisely on key labour market indicators
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll apply economic models to a range of issues in public economics and public finance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Justify government intervention in markets and understand the implications of this on efficiency and equity
  • Assess how the size and composition of the public sector has changed over time and how its structure differs across economies
  • Examine the key concepts that underlie tax theory, the characteristics of tax systems, and variations in patterns of taxation
  • Analyse the links between central government and devolved regions
  • Prepare effective written materials
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll also build an understanding of how to apply economic analysis to problems such as environmental pollution and unemployment.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of core economic theories and principles
  • Apply relevant analytical methods in micro and macroeconomics
  • Understand the issues surrounding the sustainable and socially optimal use of scarce resources
Teaching activities
  • 24 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 1.5-hour exam (80% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Placement year

After your second year, you’ll get the opportunity to take an optional placement year, working in an organisation to gain valuable experience and put your skills to work.

You’ll get mentoring and support throughout. We’ll help you find a placement that supports your interests and workplace ambitions.

Previous students have secured placements at:

Many students go on to work for their placement employer after the course.

Work experience and career planning

To help you secure a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course that'll develop your skills and build links in the industry.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and opportunities that will complement your studies and develop your abilities.

Since graduation, I have developed a career in financial advice. I joined a small business with a strong reputation within the industry for the quality of its service. The highly quantitative content within my degree course has had a significantly positive influence on my ability to work with numbers on a daily basis.

Rob May, BSc Econ Hons Economics, Finance and Banking student

Learning support

As well as support by faculty teaching staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers free advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • workshops
  • tutorials
  • practical sessions

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who'll teach you on this course.

Alexis Stenfors, Senior Lecturer

Alexis joined the University to teach economics and finance subjects after an extensive career in the foreign exchange and interest rate derivatives markets, having been a trader at HSBC, Citi, Crédit Agricole and Merrill Lynch.

He is the author of ‘Barometer of Fear: An Insider’s Account of Rogue Trading and the Greatest Banking Scandal in History’, a book discussing his time in the finance industry.

 

Giorgio Bendoni, Teaching Fellow

Giorgio had a long career in the Navy before moving into managerial positions within the Aviation and Marine Industry and the Technology sector. He teaches on a variety of courses at undergraduate level including topics such as: Intermediate Microeconomics; Quantitative Economics; Economics of Money Banking and Financial Markets; International Banking and Financial Management.

 

Paul Lovejoy, Senior Teaching Fellow

Following an initial spell in the manufacturing industry, Paul spent most of his career in local and regional economic development: working a economist supporting regional venture capital funds, as a director of an international consultancy company and as a leader of economic development agencies.

He teaches macroeconomics, primarily to first year undergraduate students.

Graeme Chamberlain, Senior Teaching Fellow

Graeme is a macroeconomics expert. He has previously worked in the private sector for a boutique economics consultancy firm, and in the Government Economic Service at the Office for National Statistics and the Office for Budget Responsibility.

Adam Cox, Senior Lecturer

Adam leads engagement with local authorities and businesses, to develop ways of using economics to solve business and public policy problems. He specialises in teaching microeconomics to those who have not studied economics previously.

Pierre Fallier, Reader

Pierre's ongoing research into marine resources management has gained plaudits from around the world. He leads a number of high profile research projects, and specialises in teaching Development Economics.

How you'll spend your time

Each academic year is divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Most teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • analysis of topical case studies
  • written reports
  • examinations
  • essays
  • presentations
  • self-led independent study project

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 62% by written exams, 4% by practical exams and 34% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 62% by written exams and 38% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 37% by written exams and 63% by coursework

Entry requirements​

BSc (Econ) (Hons) Economics, Finance and Banking degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112-120 points from 3 A levels or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 units a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each unit.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Common questions about this subject

Can't find the answer to your questions about this course or anything else about undergraduate life? Contact us

Common economics, finance and banking questions

Finance involves the management of money. It includes activities such as investing, borrowing, lending, budgeting, saving and forecasting, and can relate to governments and public spending, individuals and corporations.

Banking is related to activities that banks carry out, such as lending money and accepting and safeguarding it.

This degree studies the financial sector and how agents, such as banks, operate.

The financial sector is a part of a functioning economy. This means an understanding of economics gives you a clearer view of how and why the financial sector operates, agents' roles within the sector, and the external (macroeconomic) forces that affect them.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – LN13
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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