A student tracking an athlete's progress in the gym. BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science.
UCAS Code
C600
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2022, September 2023

Overview

Pushing boundaries. Breaking records. Competing in extreme environments. 

On this BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science degree, you’ll learn to apply scientific principles that help athletes perform at their best.

But it's not just elite sportspeople who will benefit from your knowledge and skills. Become a passionate advocate for the essential role sports science plays in society as you uncover ways everyone can use physical activity to boost their health and wellbeing.

Course highlights

  • Put your learning into practice in our advanced sports science facilities including three climatic chambers, a swimming flume and motion capture systems
  • Be taught by expert staff who are actively engaged in research projects that inform the future of sport and exercise science
  • Enhance your CV as you gain valuable experience through our ties with local sports and healthcare providers
  • Gain first aid, national coaching and specialised gym instructor qualifications
  • Set yourself up for a career in professional sport, healthcare or education
Kirsty's experience studying BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science
"When I came on an Open Day, I just thought, 'wow!'..."

Find out about the facilities, location and course that made Kirsty choose Portsmouth to study a BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science degree.

Kirsty: I chose the University of Portsmouth because when I came on the Open Days and you get out the car, you just think 'wow!'

When you get to come see all of the equipment that there is, and the different lecturers and what they do, I just thought 'yeah, I really wanna come here'.

I love Portsmouth because you get the best of both worlds, you get the city side, cos I'm from London so it's a bit similar, but then also, if you want the quietness of a seaside town, you get to go down to the beach.

I really like studying Sports Science because you get to specialise your knowledge, so I'm looking into cystic fibrosis at the moment for my dissertation, and it just allows you to hammer down really what you want to do in the future.

 

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework
British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences Endorsed Course logo

Endorsed by:

This course is endorsed by the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Typical offers
  • A levels – AAB–ABB
  • UCAS points – 128–136 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, PE, Physics, Psychology or Sports Science and the Active Leisure Industry or Sports Studies) (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DDD
  • International Baccalaureate – 26–27

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – AAB–ABB
  • UCAS points – 128–136 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, PE, Physics, Psychology or Sports Science and the Active Leisure Industry or Sports Studies) (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DDD
  • International Baccalaureate – 26–27
  • T levels – Merit–Distinction

You may need to have studied specific subjects – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

Facilities and specialist equipment

Male student sits on swing in extreme environments lab

Extreme environments laboratories

See how altitude and humidity affect people's comfort, performance and survival. Features an immersion pool and swimming flume, which acts like a treadmill for swimmers.

Learn more

Woman running next to cameras in bra testing facility

Biomechanics laboratory

Use equipment including force plates, pressure plates and our electromyography system to explore the impact of exercise on the body in this lab, from the limits of human endurance to the effects of chronic health conditions.

Learn more

Student and researcher discussing breast health exam on laptop

Dr Alex Milligan Research Laboratory

A flexible work space featuring a Polhemus motion tracking system for tracking athletes' movement in 3D and a DEXA scanner for measuring body fat.

Learn more

Elite athletes running on a track

Sports and human performance testing

Analyse sports performance and environmental physiology, and use some of the best extreme environments facilities in the UK.

Learn more

An artist impression of the new swimming pool in Ravelin Sports Centre

Opening 2022: Our £50m sports centre

Train and play in one of the UK's greenest sports centres, including 8-lane swimming pool, virtual skiing, climbing wall and more.

Learn more

A woman using the gym equipment at St Paul's Gym

Gym and classes

St Paul's Gym has all you need for cardio, resistance and weight training, complete with air-conditioning and BT Sport. Membership includes a range of fitness classes too.

Learn more

The lab classes enhance what you have already learnt during lectures.

Emma Burnett, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Careers and opportunities

In today's health-conscious world, the sports and health industries continue to expand. Sport and exercise scientists have a vital role in keeping sportspeople, athletes and the general population in peak physical health.

What jobs can you do with a sport and exercise degree?

Roles our graduates have gone onto include:

  • PE teacher
  • personal trainer
  • clinical physiologist
  • NVQ coordinator
  • sports development officer
  • sports and exercise scientist
  • sports therapist and physiotherapist
  • cardiac rehabilitation technician 

Graduate destinations

Organisations our graduates have gone on to work in, include:

  • Crystal Palace Football Club
  • Portsmouth Tennis Academy
  • Bupa
  • Nuffield Health

Ongoing careers support

After you graduate, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability Service as you advance in your career.

Placement year (optional)

Either before or following your third year, you have the option to choose a work placement year to gain valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

Our specialist team of Science and Health Careers advisors can help you with finding a work placement and improving your employability skills. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search – including help with applications and interviews – and support throughout your placement year.

Potential placement roles

Previous students have taken on placement roles including:

  • sport for development project officer
  • performance analyst
  • assistant sports therapist
  • women's sport engagement officer
  • physical technician
  • academy coach
  • PE teacher
  • physiotherapist assistant
  • rugby development coach
  • nutritionist

Potential placement destinations

Previous students have completed placements in the following organisations:

  • Reading FC
  • Pompey in the Community
  • Exeter City FC
  • Sussex County Cricket Club
  • Welsh Rugby Union (WRU)
Daniel's placement - Strength and conditioning and Portsmouth FC Academy

Daniel Coleman, a Sport and Exercise Science BSc student, talks about his placement working on strength and conditioning at Portsmouth Football Academy.

Daniel: Placements aren't compulsory, but it's something that really helps, especially in the sports science sector.

Working at Portsmouth Football Club helps massively build my confidence, I'm working with junior athletes up to the first team at Portsmouth.

It makes me feel really proud to know that if in 10 years' that I can see them running around the pitch, I know I've had a part to play in that. 

 

Study abroad

You'll also have the opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner universities. Studying overseas is a fantastic opportunity to enhance your CV and experience a different culture as an international student.

Many of our students describe their time spent studying abroad as truly life-changing, as well as an excellent way to stand out to future employers.

What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits.

Year 1
Year 2
Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll explore the theoretical basis required for the application of biomechanics in sport and exercise.

You’ll develop the practical skills required to collect biomechanical data using current and emerging technologies, to understand sporting technique and develop your knowledge of human performance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply biomechanical knowledge and principles to a variety of sporting situations
  • Utilise appropriate practical skills for the collection and analysis of biomechanical data
  • Manage information and communicate effectively in an appropriate format for biomechanics
Teaching activities
  • 27 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 40 hours of lectures
  • 4 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 329 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-page coursework report (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore how systems such as the musculoskeletal system, the cardio-vascular system and the respiratory system affect human performance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply sport and exercise physiology knowledge and principles to a variety of sporting situations
  • Use appropriate practical skills for the collection and analysis of sport and exercise physiology data
  • Develop appropriate teamwork skills during physiological data collection
  • Manage information and communicate effectively in an appropriate format for sport and exercise physiology
Teaching activities
  • 28 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 22 hours of lectures
  • 25 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 325 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-page coursework report (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore some of the core areas of psychological theory in the context of sport and exercise settings. You'll develop an understanding around different psychological theories that can be used to study behaviour in sport and exercise environments.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe basic knowledge of theories in the core areas of sport and exercise psychology
  • Describe how psychological methods can be used to influence sport and exercise behaviour and performance
  • Describe information from a variety of sources, including qualitative and quantitative research
  • Display the appropriate enquiry skills to conduct measurement and/or analytical procedures in sport and exercise psychology in a safe, reliable and precise manner
  • Utilise leadership or collaborative working skills to support success
  • Effectively communicate key aspects and findings to a variety of audiences using a range of media
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 328 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)
  • a coursework report (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll explore the impact that external environments and sex have on sport and exercise performance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the cardio-pulmonary and metabolic responses to exercise in healthy individuals
  • Critically evaluate various physiological factors limiting exercise ability in healthy adults
  • Utilise appropriate data handling and analysis techniques & interpret your findings
Teaching activities
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 16 hours of lectures
  • 6 hours of seminars
  • 8 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

Using industry standard equipment, you’ll use these principles to critically analyse how biomechanics can be used to improve sport and exercise performance or reduce injury risk.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast biomechanical data collected using emerging digital technologies in new situations in either a sports injury or performance context
  • Demonstrate your ability to analyse biomechanical data within a team, to investigate applied scenarios
  • Communicate ideas relating to biomechanical analyses to a scientific audience
  • Apply knowledge and demonstrate intellectual curiosity of biomechanical principles to examples in sport and exercise
  • Demonstrate understanding of biomechanical data collection and processing methodologies
Teaching activities
  • 6 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 11 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the key considerations when preparing to conduct research, innovation and enterprise project work.

You’ll look at various designs and approaches to develop your knowledge and awareness in preparation for research, innovation and enterprise project work moving into your final year.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate and appraise approaches to tackling research, innovation and enterprise projects
  • Propose and justify a suitable methodology and appropriate plan for a specific research, innovation or enterprise project
  • Propose and explain the correct analysis or evaluation approach for a specific research innovation or enterprise project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops, and project supervision meetings. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

Using contemporary theory and research, you’ll develop your understanding of the factors that impact on sport performance and athlete mental health.

You'll learn about the promotion of physical activity and the role of exercise in the treatment of mental health problems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Integrate and evaluate appropriate theories, models and research in sport and exercise psychology
  • Communicate your knowledge effectively through written work
  • Demonstrate intellectual curiosity of key and emerging issues in the psychology of sport and exercise for individuals, groups, and organisations
  • Locate, summarise and accurately reference appropriate information sources using current and emerging digital technologies to answer research questions
Teaching activities
  • 7 hours of lectures
  • 9 hours of seminars
  • 10 hours of tutorials
  • 4 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments including essays (50% of final mark, each)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll develop a critical understanding of physiological responses to cold, heat and other atmospheric conditions. In addition, you'll have the chance to experience various modes of exercise in different environmental conditions in a laboratory setting.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the physiological responses to different environmental stressors
  • Discuss the physiological responses to different modes of exercise
  • Measure and evaluate the effect of the environment on exercise performance
  • Discuss the impact of task and environment on physical performance
Teaching activities
  • 10 hours of laboratory time
  • 14 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of seminars
  • a 1-hour tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x written coursework assignments including essay (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You’ll develop a critical understanding of the requirements for fluid, macro and micronutrients for health, fitness and sport. You'll learn the skills needed to analyse the relationships between nutrition, health, fitness and sports performance.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse, synthesise and evaluate current research on nutritional strategies suggested to optimise health and/or physical performance
  • Develop knowledge and proficiency in measurement techniques to indicate nutritional status in relation to health and or sport
  • Discuss and critically reflect upon the factors that determine energy balance and their relation to health and disease or sport performance
  • Perform a dietary analysis
Teaching activities
  • 11 hours of lectures
  • 11 hours of seminars
  • 11 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a report (65% of final mark)
  • a portfolio (35% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll then explore how the ageing process impacts normal physiological function. As a research-driven module, you'll gain invaluable practical experience in the assessment of physical activity and health.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the role of physical activity and exercise in the maintenance of optimal health across the lifespan
  • Measure, analyse and interpret physiological data in relation to health status
  • Demonstrate appropriate presentation skills to communicate scientific knowledge effectively
  • Explain the physiological adaptations that occur as humans age and how these relate to health status
  • Identify appropriate exercise tests and training programmes for paediatric and elderly populations
  • Explain the effects that physical activity and exercise training have on cardiovascular, metabolic, pulmonary and musculoskeletal health
Teaching activities
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 23 hours of lectures
  • 11 hours of seminars
  • 2 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 158 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (70% of final mark)

More information about this module will be available soon. 

What you'll do

You’ll develop an understanding of core psychological theories and models that are applied to skill acquisition.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe key concepts and principles of the Skill Acquisition process
  • Critically evaluate the efficiency of different approaches to the study and training of perceptual skill in sport
  • Design the appropriate practice environment to promote perceptual motor skill acquisition in a safe, reliable and precise manner
  • Identify and use the appropriate instructions and feedback (when, what and how) to enable effective communication to a variety of audiences
Teaching activities
  • 3 hours of lectures
  • 16 hours of seminars
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 12 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a  2500-word coursework report (50% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentations (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge, understanding and practical skills in applied strength and conditioning, physiology, biomechanics and injury.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and evaluate the strength and conditioning requirements for a training programme
  • Design a training programme according to a client's requirements and best practice in strength and conditioning
  • Evaluate the underpinning scientific justification for a training regimen
  • Select and teach exercises appropriate to the client's needs using best practice in strength and conditioning
Teaching activities
  • 16 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 2 hours of lectures
  • 10 hours of seminars
  • 6 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll be advised by University staff of the nature of the project which you'll undertake. The project will usually be group-based but in exceptional cases, individual projects may be undertaken.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently and as part of a team in an effective manner
  • Critically evaluate the existing literature on a particular topic to form a research hypothesis and method
  • Apply appropriate scientific techniques to implement the research plan and evaluate its effectiveness
  • Analyse data, evaluate findings, and draw evidence-based and well-argued conclusions in an academically rigorous manner
  • Communicate effectively the research process and the findings by means of a written report
  • Present your research project in the form of a poster presentation, demonstrating an ability to respond to markers' questions on all aspects of the project
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and project supervision meetings. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 383 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word dissertation (70% of final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You will critically appraise current sport supplement evidence and literature and be able to understand the strengths and limitations of the research.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise the evidence supporting ergogenic aids and come to a balanced conclusion
  • Collect and analyse data from laboratory practicals
  • Present findings from laboratory practicals in a poster presentation
  • Present findings from laboratory practical’s in a scientific article
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 8 hours of lectures
  • 4 hours of seminars
  • 10 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark) – a 10-minute presentation, a 5-minute question and answer session, and 5-minutes to change over
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll be challenged to apply contemporary theories and methodologies to the evaluation of strength and conditioning. You'll critically evaluate applied strength and conditioning research and advanced analysis procedures.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe key concepts and principles of the study of strength and conditioning
  • Use new and existing knowledge of human responses and adaptations to plan and deliver an effective strength and conditioning coaching session
  • Identify and review the strength and conditioning requirements for a long term periodised training programme
  • Critically evaluate emerging themes in the strength and conditioning literature regarding their practical application to the delivery of effective programmes and sessions
  • Effectively communicate key aspects to a variety of audiences using video presentation
  • Be able to work in a range of environments, responding positively to new situations by being aware, flexible, and adaptable
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes and workshops, and take part in guided independent study.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 175 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine core issues in the development of test procedures and protocols for physiological assessment in both laboratory and field settings.

You'll expand your understanding of how these procedures influence the information that's obtained and develop a critical analysis and interpretation of this information.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and critically evaluate tests used in the physiological assessment of athletes
  • Evaluate data from athlete assessment and provide evidence-based training guidelines
  • Translate data from research studies into practitioner-friendly information
Teaching activities
  • 6 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 11 hours of seminars
  • 10 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 173 hours studying independently. This is around 

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine various approaches and methods to make skill learning more effective and robust. You'll study examples and applications from current research across domains including development age groups and elite level athletes.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare, contrast and critically appraise theoretical perspectives in skill acquisition specific to practice design topics
  • Critically contextualise and outline applied issues in skill acquisition research for elite athletes
  • Interact effectively as a member of a group to compare, contrast and critically translate scientific research to inform the delivery of an evidence-based practical
  • Critically evaluate limitations of current skill acquisition research, evidence and outline requirements for future work
  • Critically contextualise and outline applied issues in skill acquisition research for children and youth athletes
  • Compare, contrast and critically appraise theoretical perspectives in skill acquisition specific to perceptual motor learning topics
Teaching activities
  • 8 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 12 hours of seminars
  • 12 hours of tutorials

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a coursework report (50% of mark)

What you'll do

In this module you will critically evaluate applied sports and exercise biomechanics research and advanced biomechanical analysis procedures.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate musculoskeletal biomechanics using appropriate evidence, theories and methodologies
  • Select and apply appropriate advanced biomechanical analysis techniques in complex sporting and clinical scenarios
  • Apply and disseminate complex biomechanical principles in a professional manner using appropriate language and terminology
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 173 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also critically explore health promotion and apply this knowledge to design a 'real world' programme.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to

  • Critically evaluate, synthesise and translate research evidence for a lay audience
  • Effectively pitch an idea for a community-based project to a funding agency, and in doing so, develop one's employability skill set
  • Effectively work in a team to design and critically discuss a health promotion initiative which is rigorously informed by theory and research
  • Respond to health challenges in a professional capacity by translating knowledge for the improvement of local, national, and the international community
Teaching activities
  • 4 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 5 hours of lectures
  • 12 hours of seminars
  • 6 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 173 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment including essay (25% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark
  • a 2,000-word coursework portfolio (50% of mark)

What you'll do

You’ll experience extreme environments first hand, then use this to critically analyse the methods used to enable humans to work and perform in these environments.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Incorporate new and existing knowledge to understand the responses to extreme environments (heat, cold, altitude and depth)
  • Critically evaluate the impact of extreme environments on human physiology and exercise performance
  • Evaluate information on the effects that environmental stressors have on pathophysiology
  • Communicate with different audiences explaining the impact of extreme environments on human physiology
  • Measure and analyse physiological status in relation to extreme environmental stressors
Teaching activities
  • 5 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 10 hours of lectures
  • 9 hours of seminars
  • 2 hours of tutorials

We recommend you spend at least 175 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5-minute audio podcast (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

The three primary routes in this model include a work placement, an independent learning project or a mini self-employment placement.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on and evaluate your knowledge, skills, behaviours and experiences that are relevant to the requirements of a graduate career
  • Analyse career development needs, and synthesise a short-term career development plan
  • Analyse further career development needs, and incorporate short, medium and long term career objectives in your career development plan
  • Identify and discuss evidence to demonstrate your personal and professional development
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in a placement, and attend tutorials and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a coursework portfolio (25% of final mark)
  • a coursework portfolio (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop an appreciation of theory and research related to coaching in sport and will consider how best to apply this in practical setting.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and analyse key concepts and principles of the practice of sport psychology
  • Select the appropriate techniques to conduct psychological assessments for athletes, teams and coaches in a safe, reliable, and precise manner
  • Critically examine data derived from psychological assessments for athletes, teams and coaches to analyse client psychological issues
  • Critically evaluate core techniques and strategies aimed at improving athlete, team, and coach performance in sport
  • Synthesise information from a variety of sources to produce appropriate evidence-based recommendations to improve client performance
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and tutorials. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework report (60% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

  • written exams
  • essays and lab reports
  • individual or group presentations
  • practical exercises

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • laboratory work
  • tutorials
  • work in field settings

You'll also get support from a personal tutor throughout your degree.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

Lecturers are extremely approachable, friendly and helpful – they are often happy to engage in conversation about their field of interest outside of lectures.

Shamica Powell, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops and guided independent study for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting your learning

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK) for one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1-2-1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to:

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from the faculty librarian for science.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2022 start) 

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll have to pay for meals and other living costs while completing compulsory fieldwork, amounting to £50–£1000. Travel and accommodation costs are covered by your course fee.

You’ll need to contribute towards the cost of optional fieldwork programmes, which usually come to £50–£1000.

You may need to a pay a returnable deposit for some field trips to ensure attendance. For day trips, this deposit is £20. For trips that last several days and require overnight stay, the deposit is £50. The deposit for these trips will be returned to you after the trip.

If you take an optional placement unit or placement year, you’ll need to cover the costs of travel, accommodation and subsistence. These costs will vary depending on the duration and location of the placement. The cost will usually be £50–£1000.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – C600
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

To start this course in 2023, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – C600
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.