A student tracking an athlete's progress in the gym

Sport and Exercise Science BSc (Hons)

Learn scientific principles that help athletes perform at their best and discover the role physical activity can play in improving people's health.

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University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

C600

Accreditation:

This course is Accredited

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 UCAS points from a specific Science subject

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

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Overview

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If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

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Pushing boundaries. Breaking records. Competing in extreme environments. 

On this BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science degree, you’ll learn to apply scientific principles that help athletes perform at their best.

But it's not just elite sportspeople who will benefit from your knowledge and skills. Become a passionate advocate for the essential role sports science plays in society as you uncover ways everyone can use physical activity to boost their health and wellbeing.

Explore BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science at Portsmouth

Find out more about our BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science degree course, including what you'll study, the facilities you'll access, and the career opportunities it offers.

Joseph Moore: Sport and exercise science is a combination of biomechanics, physiology and psychology. The course here at the University of Portsmouth is accredited by Bases, which is the British Association of Sport and Exercises and Bases are the governing body for sport and exercise science. 

Here at the University of Portsmouth, we have a number of different laboratory spaces that are used both for teaching but also all of the research that goes on within the university. We also have lots of equipment that can analyse how much we are breathing. We have motion capture systems, force plates and also sensors that allow us to measure the amount of muscle activity that's going on. 

One of our areas within the university is what's called our Extreme Environments Laboratory to allow us to simulate a variety of different temperatures and different environments to see how the body adapts. 

The key thing for us is the employable skills that you gain throughout your degree. Yes, set yourself up for a sport and exercise science career, but it also gives you a really good base of transferable skills that allow you to be successful in any workplace. 

In terms of the placements we have two opportunities through placements and that can be that done between your second and third years or actually by postponing your graduation and doing after your third year. 

Careers after sport and exercise science are really, really broad, such strength and conditioning coaches, personal trainers, clinical physiology roles, physiotherapy. But we also have a number of students who go to work within football clubs, within rugby clubs as sports scientists. So one thing I say to any student considering coming to the University of Portsmouth is we can really promise you that you are going to be taught by enthusiastic experts in sport and exercise science. Yes, your degree might be three or four years depending if you do a placement, but that's not where the journey ends. And we're going to be really focussed on ensuring that your time at university is going to set yourself up to get that dream job and be a success in your future career. 

Course highlights

  • Put your learning into practice in our advanced sports science facilities including three climatic chambers, a swimming flume and motion capture systems
  • Be taught by expert staff who are actively engaged in research projects that inform the future of sport and exercise science
  • Enhance your CV as you gain valuable experience through our ties with local sports and healthcare providers
  • Set yourself up for a career in professional sport, healthcare or education
The British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences

5th

for Anatomy and Physiology in the UK

(Guardian University Guide, 2024)

Top 30

for student satisfaction

(Times Higher Education, 2024)

Endorsed by:

This course is endorsed by the British Association of Sport and Exercise Sciences (BASES).

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074

Clearing is open

This course is available through Clearing.

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

Apply now

Guaranteed accommodation

Apply now and you'll be offered a guaranteed room in halls if you accept your offer within 48 hours of receiving it.
Student accommodation
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Connected Degrees®

Only at Portsmouth you have the choice to take a traditional sandwich placement before your third year, or to take your placement after your final year.

Upbeat music plays over information about Connected Degrees® from the University of Portsmouth.

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Clearing 2024 opens on 5 July and closes on 21 October

Every year thousands of students find their ideal undergraduate course through Clearing. Clearing matches students who are looking for a different course or university from their original choice, or who are applying for the very first time after 30 June, to courses that universities still have places on.

The majority of people apply through Clearing once they receive their exam results on A level / T level results day (15 August 2024).

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The majority of UK students apply through Clearing once they receive their A level / T level results in August 2024, so as an international student if you already have your exam results you can apply when Clearing opens. 

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Entry requirements

BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, PE, Physics, Psychology or Sports Science and the Active Leisure Industry or Sports Studies). (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit. Acceptable T Level Subjects:
    T Level in Health, T Level in Healthcare Science, T Level in Science
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects –find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, with 32 points from a Science subject (Biology, Chemistry, Mathematics, PE, Physics, Psychology or Sports Science and the Active Leisure Industry or Sports Studies). (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit. Acceptable T Level Subjects:
    T Level in Health, T Level in Healthcare Science, T Level in Science
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 25

You may need to have studied specific subjects or GCSEs – see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

If you don't meet the entry requirements, you may be able to join this course after you successfully complete a foundation year.

We look at more than just your grades

While we consider your grades when making an offer, we also carefully look at your circumstances and other factors to assess your potential. These include whether you live and work in the region and your personal and family circumstances which we assess using established data.

Explore more about how we make your offer

Facilities and specialist equipment

Extreme environments laboratories

See how altitude and humidity affect people's comfort, performance and survival. Features an immersion pool and swimming flume, which acts like a treadmill for swimmers.

A man in a harness being submerged in water
Learn more

Biomechanics Laboratory

Use equipment including force plates, pressure plates and our electromyography system to explore the impact of exercise on the body in this lab, from the limits of human endurance to the effects of chronic health conditions.

A person using a device with a wide lens
Explore lab

Dr Alex Milligan Research Laboratory

A flexible work space featuring a Polhemus motion tracking system for tracking athletes' movement in 3D and a DEXA scanner for measuring body fat.

Breast health mechanics research
Learn more

Sports and Human Performance Testing

Analyse sports performance and environmental physiology, and use some of the best extreme environments facilities in the UK.

Male and female ultramarathon competitors crossing finish line
Learn more

Strength, Conditioning and Rehabilitation Suite

Our Strength, Conditioning, and Rehabilitation Suite integrates advanced methods to empower athletes and optimise rehabilitation outcomes through training, research, and professional development in sport and health sciences.

A student tracking an athlete's progress in the gym
Explore facility

Research in the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Science

Learn more about the groundbreaking research in several key areas and themes being carried out at the School of Sport, Health and Exercise Science.

Dr Joe Costello:

Our research spans the broader area of sport, health and exercise. We have three research themes. The first is Extreme Environments focuses on the selection, preparation and protection of those who enter extreme environments. The second is physical activity, health and rehabilitation. So we focus on clinical and also non-clinical conditions and also how physical activity can help improve the lives of people. Our third and final theme, Individual, occupational and organisational performance looks to see how we can improve the performance of individuals, organisations and teams. 

The facilities that I use at the university is our biomechanics lab. The types of equipment that we use is a 3D-camera system. Which allows us to put markers on an individual and track their movement in 3D so we can really look at their movement in detail. We also use force platforms to have a look at the ground reaction forces and also EMG as well, which is Electromyography, which allows us to look at muscle activity and we can track that through different rehabilitation processes.

So the outcomes that I've seen from my research has been improvements in walking speed, for example, which we know is one of the high outcomes of quality of life for individuals who live with stroke. In sort of the preliminary research that we've had a look at, it's looking positive in terms of using different robotic rehabilitations to improve functional outcomes of individuals with stroke.

I'm based with the Extreme Environments Group and they've built a reputation over many years of looking at the physiological responses to all of our different extreme environments. So our heat, our cold and our hypoxia, we can effectively recreate any environment that you would come across on Earth. So we've got a heat chamber that can go up to around about 50 degrees. We've got a cold chamber that can go down to about -20. And then we also have another environmental chamber that contains a flume. And then, all three of those chambers can create a hypoxic environment or simulate altitude so we can go anywhere from sea level to around about 8000 metres. So, we could effectively put someone in a rainforest, in a desert, up the top of Mount Everest.

The facilities and expertise that we have in Portsmouth are among the best in the world. With the heating, we can increase the temperature in the flume and use the mechanism to move people into the flume and control how hot they get by adjusting their position. We have a plunge pool as well in one of the other environmental chambers, and then also we can simply just use normal hot tubs.

In terms of career opportunities, the great thing about the extreme environments work in particular is that often exposure to these extreme environments often mimics clinical conditions. So as well as continuing to be able to offer guidance and work in the areas specific to extreme environments, it also opens up a really nice avenue for you to then go in to work in hospitals, in more clinical populations.

I'm really proud of the research that I do. There's been some particular individuals who wouldn't leave their house at all, even if a member of their family went with them. And now, at the end of their intervention, are happy to walk to the corner shop, even on their own and that has a massive impact on their quality of life, and that's really amazing.

Some of the research that's come out of this school has heavily informed the 'RNLI: Respect the Water Campaign' over the last couple of years, and that's something that makes me passionate to continue working at the University of Portsmouth.

The lab classes enhance what you have already learnt during lectures.

Emma Burnett, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Careers and opportunities

In today's health-conscious world, the sports and health industries continue to expand. Sport and exercise scientists have a vital role in keeping sportspeople, athletes and the general population in peak physical health.

Sport and Exercise Science Graduate Sam Millard

Meet Sam Millard, an assistant strength and conditioning coach, and a graduate of the University of Portsmouth's Sport and Exercise Science degree. 

 Sport and Exercise Science is a combination of biomechanics, physiology and psychology.
The course here at the University of Portsmouth is accredited by BASES, which is the British Association of Sport and Exercises Sciences and BASES are the governing body for Sport and Exercise Science.
Here at the University of Portsmouth we have a number of different laboratory spaces that are used both for teaching but also a lot of the research that goes on within the university.
We also have lots of equipment that can analyse how much we are breathing.
We have motion capture systems, force plates and also sensors that allow us to measure the amount of muscle activity that's going on.
One of our areas within the university is what's called our Extreme Environments Laboratory that allows us to simulate a variety of different temperatures and different environments to see how the body adapts.
The key thing for us is the employable skills that you gain throughout your degree.
Yes, set yourself up for a sport and exercise science career, but also give you a really good base of transferable skills which will allow you to be successful in any workplace.
In terms of the placements, we have two opportunities to do placements and that can be either done between your second and third years or actually by postponing your graduation and doing after your third year.
Careers after Sport and Exercise Science are really, really broad such as strength and conditioning coaches, personal trainers, clinical physiology roles, physiotherapy, but we also have a number of students who go to work within football clubs, within rugby clubs, as a sport scientists.
So one thing I say to any student who’s considering coming to the University of Portsmouth is, we can really promise you that you are going to be taught by enthusiastic experts in sport and exercise science.
Yes, your degree might be three or four years depending if you do a placement, but that's not where the journey ends and we're going to be really focused on ensuring that your time at university is going to set yourself up to get that dream job and be a success in your future career.

What jobs can you do with a sport and exercise degree?

Roles our graduates have gone onto include:

  • PE teacher
  • personal trainer
  • clinical physiologist
  • NVQ coordinator
  • sports development officer
  • sports and exercise scientist
  • sports therapist and physiotherapist
  • cardiac rehabilitation technician

Graduate destinations

Organisations our graduates have gone on to work in, include:

  • Crystal Palace Football Club
  • Portsmouth Tennis Academy
  • Bupa
  • Nuffield Health

Ongoing careers support

After you graduate, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability Service as you advance in your career.

Placement year (optional)

Either before or following your third year, you have the option to choose a work placement year to gain valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

Our specialist team of Science and Health Careers advisors can help you with finding a work placement and improving your employability skills. They'll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search – including help with applications and interviews – and support throughout your placement year.

Potential placement roles

Previous students have taken on placement roles including:

  • sport for development project officer
  • performance analyst
  • assistant sports therapist
  • women's sport engagement officer
  • physical technician
  • academy coach
  • PE teacher
  • physiotherapist assistant
  • rugby development coach
  • nutritionist

Potential placement destinations

Previous students have completed placements in the following organisations:

  • Reading FC
  • Pompey in the Community
  • Exeter City FC
  • Sussex County Cricket Club
  • Welsh Rugby Union (WRU)

Jamie's placement - Portsmouth Football Club

Jamie Todd, a BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science student, talks about his placement working on performance analysis at Portsmouth Football Club.

Jamie Todd: Since I started university, I knew this is what I wanted to do.

Richard Hughes: The students that we're lucky enough to have here provide a real big element of the work we do. They're gaining a great experience from their personal perspective as well, but also they provide an invaluable service to us in functioning the football club on a day to day basis and getting an understanding of what an elite football club looks like and what that environment is, is really important.

Jamie Todd: I currently studying Sport and Exercise Science at the University of Portsmouth and I've come on placement here with the football club to work with the sports science department to basically help them out in terms of the GPS analysis, recovery and injury prevention. We give the players, the GPS vests, which allow us to look at total distance, accelerations and decelerations, high sprint distance and maximum velocity. So I already had in my mind I wanted to go into a football club and do a placement. Looking for that link between the university and football club was massive for me to be able to get the opportunity to come on placement and gain valuable experience that I needed.

Richard Hughes:  With my background, I came through an internship program at Stoke City and I was lucky enough to be part of the analysis support. And I always like to try and give people opportunities and getting people that are really hungry to be successful.

Jamie Todd: The advice I'd give someone who's looking to do a placement for Portsmouth Football Club would be just go and do it. To be one of the students who got offered it, I feel very proud and I have got to keep going now.

Study abroad

You'll also have the opportunity to study abroad at one of our partner universities. Studying overseas is a fantastic opportunity to enhance your CV and experience a different culture as an international student.

Many of our students describe their time spent studying abroad as truly life-changing, as well as an excellent way to stand out to future employers.

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits.

Modules

Core modules

Through lectures, practical sessions and seminars, you'll develop the practical, team and leadership skills needed to collect biomechanical data in different environments. You'll apply biomechanical knowledge and principles to a variety of sporting situations and use current technologies to understand sporting technique, enhancing your knowledge of human performance. You'll learn to manage information, interpret your findings and become an effective communicator in presenting biomechanical insights.

Through lectures, practical sessions and workshops, you'll apply sport and exercise physiology knowledge and principles to a variety of sporting situations. You'll use appropriate physiological techniques to collect and analyse data, learn to manage information and become an effective communicator in presenting sport and exercise physiology insights.

Through lectures, practical sessions and workshops, you'll develop skills in data collection, analysis, team work and leadership, and learn to integrate data with theory and practical knowledge. You'll discover how to effectively communicate findings to a variety of audiences and describe your knowledge of core areas in sport and exercise psychology. You'll explore how psychological theories explain sport and exercise behaviour and performance, and describe information from a variety of sources, including qualitative and quantitative research.

Core modules

Examine how responses differ between exercise modes and how psychological factors can limit exercise performance. Discover the different methods behind exercise data collection, handling, processing and interpretation.

You'll compare biomechanical data from current technologies in either a performance or sports injury context, showcasing your understanding of biomechanical data collection and processing methodologies. As you communicate your ideas in biomechanical analyses to a scientific audience, you'll demonstrate intellectual curiosity of biomechanical principles and apply them to examples in sport and exercise.

Explore research planning, underpinning philosophy, ethical considerations, research methods, data analyses and qualitative and quantitative approaches. As you prepare for your own research project, you'll gain an understanding of the research principles and practices taught in your final year. As part of this module, you'll be provided with the staff research projects you can select from for your final year project.

Evaluate the factors that impact sport performance, athlete mental health and the psychology of physical activity – considering the role exercise can play in the treatment of mental health conditions. You'll learn to present references as per scientific conventions, critique literature and communicate your knowledge effectively through written work. When you finish, you'll be intellectually curious of key and emerging issues in the psychology of sport and exercise.

Optional modules

You’ll interpret physiological data to explain exercise’s impact on cardiovascular, metabolic, pulmonary and musculoskeletal health from childhood to older age. You’ll apply this knowledge first-hand, learning to communicate and present scientific knowledge effectively. Gain perspective on how inactivity in earlier years threatens health later in life and equip yourself with valuable practical experience in the assessment of physical activity and health.

Determine how different modes of exercise, environmental conditions and stressors can affect physiological responses. Through laboratory practicals you'll develop skills in collection, analysis and the interpretation of physiological data within sporting or occupational contexts.

From hydration to macro and micronutrients, you'll gain an understanding of different health, fitness and sport requirements. By applying different methods, you'll learn to assess nutrition, body composition and health-related fitness, and deepen your knowledge of relationships between nutrition, health, fitness and sports performance.

Examine feedback and analytical perspectives along with related research in performance analysis. Consider how existing research on performance analysis can be applied in real-world settings and reflect on the professional skills needed in the field of sports performance analysis.

Discover how humans learn motor skills through the analysis of contemporary theory and research, considering the perceptual and cognitive processes behind this. Learn to conduct psychological research in an ethical and safe manner and consider the role practice design and instruction play during the learning process.

Analyse the strength and conditioning requirements for a training programme, designing a programme based on client needs and best practice. Evaluate exercise technique by analysing the key exercise technical framework, suggesting advancements and simplifications for these exercises

Core modules

You'll learn to work both independently, and as part of a team, whilst you evaluate literature on a particular topic to form a research question and method. Through taught sessions you'll develop your knowledge on data analysis procedures. You'll explore how to evaluate your findings and produce well-argued and evidence-based conclusions in an academic manner. By applying appropriate scientific techniques you'll discover how to implement your research plan and evaluate it's effectiveness. You'll develop your ability to effectively communicate your research process and findings through an individual written report and confidently present your project through a poster presentation, demonstrating your ability to respond to marker questions.

Optional modules

Engage with empirical evidence and literature to understand the strengths and limitations of research. Test ergogenic aids by analysing and interpreting physiological data in practical learning and critically assess evidence supporting ergogenic aids to develop balanced conclusions.

Apply your existing knowledge of human responses to strength and conditioning training to plan and deliver effective coaching sessions, considering the requirements for long-term periodised training programmes. Evaluate emerging themes in literature and how they can be practically applied to the delivery of effective programmes and sessions whilst describing the key concepts that underpin strength and conditioning. Develop skills to work in various settings, reacting positively to new situations through awareness, flexibility, and adaptability.

Become an evidence-based exercise expert translating data from research studies into practitioner-friendly information. Evaluate key issues in the development of test procedures and protocols for physiological assessment and interpret athlete assessment data, using this to provide evidence-based training guidelines. As part of this module, you'll learn to bridge the gap between research and athletes.

You'll learn to interpret key principles and how to conduct assessments with athletes, teams and coaches. By collecting qualitative data, you'll understand important ethical and methodological aspects, as well as social and developmental issues relevant to sport and exercise psychology practitioners. Using information from a variety of sources, you'll produce evidence-based recommendations that enhance client performance and shows your analytical ability.

You'll focus on creating innovative training methods based on theory and research, doing this in two phases. Firstly, by working with elite groups and analysing current research, you'll use your knowledge to develop interventons that help others improve their skills. In the second phase of this module, you'll apply what you've learned about developing skills to younger ages groups, specifically children and adolescents in their developmental stages, and help maximise their skill progression.

Select advanced biomechanical analysis techniques and apply them to complex sporting and clinical scenarios, using this to answer relevant research questions. As part of this module, you'll choose a project area and analyse data in collaborative teams, present your project protocol, and submit an individual conference paper at the end. Using appropriate language and terminology, you'll develop professional fluency conveying complex biomechanical principles.

Engage with theory and research to design a health promotion initiative and develop your employability skill set. Pitch community initiatives to a funding agency and translate research evidence to a general audience as you develop strong teamwork skills.

Assess methods that enable people to work and perform in extreme environments. Develop assessment competence by producing a podcast presentation on aspects of physiology in extreme environments and a portfolio detailing a practical laboratory session. Learn to communicate with different audiences, sharing your insights on the impact of extreme environments on human physiology. By the end, you'll be able to confidentally discuss human physiology and pathophysiology in extreme environments.

Develop practical capabilities in physical and exercise rehabilitation, applying a multidisciplinary approach to this complex discipline. Through connected teaching and assessment, you'll appreciate the complexity of exercise-based rehab, the professions involved and potential opportunities for future research and practice. You'll evaluate evidence to ethically prescribe exercise for people living with chronic or complex health conditions. By the end, you'll have the skills to contribute to multidisciplinary teams advancing this area of health and performance.

Using relevant theory and research, you'll critically explore current methodologies and analytical techniques used in sport performance, discussing the progression of these elements in the field. You'll assess the different ways performance analysis is used in practice, considering other disciplines and how other areas of sport science contribute to supporting performance analysis practitioners. By the end, you'll have perspective on the professional skills, roles, responsibilities and competencies required of a performance analyst.

Choosing between a work placement, independent project or mini-self-employment placement, you'll enhance your organisation and communication skills and gain relevant experience towards your future graduate career. You'll critically reflect on your knowledge, skills and learning experiences relevant to a graduate career as you engage with the Careers and Employability Service. You'll analyse your career development needs, developing short, medium and long term career development plans and objectives, and identify relevant evidence that shows your personal and professional development throughout the module, showcasing this in a portfolio.

Enrich your intercultural awareness and language skills through a study abroad sandwich year or accelerate your employability through an immersive year-long work placement.

With support identifying a study exchange programme or placement opportunity, you'll take part in overseas study or a work placement and develop skills in autonomy, accountability, language, interpersonal communication, time management, planning, assessment and analysis – while considering the impact of your actions.

As you study abroad or complete your tasks in the workplace, you'll demonstrate a strong level of skill, initiative, independence and performance.

You'll return able to evaluate how study or work placement activities relate to your studies and broader global contexts, presenting a critical evaluation of your professional development.

This is a Connected Degree

We're the only university that gives you the flexibility to choose when to take a work placement. Take it after your 2nd year, before returning to finish your studies. Or after your final year, connecting you into the workplace.

If you're not sure if or when to take your placement, don't worry. You'll have plenty of time to settle into your studies and explore your options before making your choice. 

Find out more about Connected Degrees

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Lecturers are extremely approachable, friendly and helpful – they are often happy to engage in conversation about their field of interest outside of lectures.

Shamica Powell, BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

Kirsty's experience studying BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science

"When I came on an Open Day, I just thought, 'wow!'..."
Find out about the facilities, location and course that made Kirsty choose Portsmouth to study a BSc (Hons) Sport and Exercise Science degree.

Kirsty: I chose the University of Portsmouth because when I came on the Open Days and you get out the car, you just think 'wow!'

When you get to come see all of the equipment that there is, and the different lecturers and what they do, I just thought 'yeah, I really wanna come here'.

I love Portsmouth because you get the best of both worlds, you get the city side, cos I'm from London so it's a bit similar, but then also, if you want the quietness of a seaside town, you get to go down to the beach.

I really like studying Sports Science because you get to specialise your knowledge, so I'm looking into cystic fibrosis at the moment for my dissertation, and it just allows you to hammer down really what you want to do in the future.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops and guided independent study for about 9 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 per year (subject to annual increase)

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll have to pay for meals and other living costs while completing compulsory fieldwork, amounting to £50–£1000. Travel and accommodation costs are covered by your course fee.

You’ll need to contribute towards the cost of optional fieldwork programmes, which usually come to £50–£1000.

You may need to a pay a returnable deposit for some field trips to ensure attendance. For day trips, this deposit is £20. For trips that last several days and require overnight stay, the deposit is £50. The deposit for these trips will be returned to you after the trip.

If you take an optional placement unit or placement year, you’ll need to cover the costs of travel, accommodation and subsistence. These costs will vary depending on the duration and location of the placement. The cost will usually be £50–£1000.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £925 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £925 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £1,800 a year (subject to annual increase)

How to apply

Apply now through Clearing

If you have your results, you can apply directly to us now to start in September 2024.

Apply now

Applying for year 2 or 3

If you've already completed part of this course with us or another university and would like to apply for the second or third year with us in September 2024, use our online application form.

September 2025 applications

To start this course in 2025, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – C600
  • our institution code – P80

 Apply now through UCAS

 

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

Clearing Hotline: 023 9284 8074