Police officers in a line up with face masks on

Law with Criminology LLB (Hons)

This law degree gives you an understanding of criminology alongside your legal studies. You’ll have everything you need to go onto a career as a solicitor or barrister, or in the police or probation service. 

University of Portsmouth Connected Degree - 3 year course with 4th year placement

Key information

UCAS code:

M1L6

Typical offer:

112-120 UCAS points from 3 A levels, or equivalent

See full entry requirements
Study mode and duration
Start date

Showing content for section Overview

Overview

Complement your law studies with an understanding criminal behaviour and the processes of criminal justice. 

On this LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology degree you’ll learn about competing perspectives of crime, how social order can be challenged and maintained, and how the world deals with the crimes of the powerful — such as genocide and war crimes. You’ll develop your knowledge of the law and legal frameworks too, which builds an ideal foundation for a career in the police or prison services. 

You'll apply your learning throughout the course with real world scenarios or live client work, and gain practical experience with opportunities such as the Community Lawyer module.

By taking an optional paid placement year before or after your final year of study, you'll graduate with a year of industry experience too. Our Placement Club will support you throughout the placement application process, whenever you choose to complete your placement. 

Many of my lecturers have either been barristers or solicitors. This is really good, as they know what is needed to succeed in this field.

Joy Mazhambe, LLB Hons Law student

Course highlights

  • Enrich your study of law by developing your understanding of criminal behaviour and criminal justice 
  • Apply your learning in community settings to gain real-world legal practice skills
  • Have confidence in your learning with our research expertise in areas such as data protection, policing and financial crime
  • Benefit from teaching shaped by expert staff who have been practicing lawyers and criminologists, and who understand how the legal landscape is changing
  • Be able to obtain module exemptions from the Professional Qualification in Probation
  • Benefit from our partnership with Barbri, the world’s largest legal exam preparation experts, if you choose to do your Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE) after graduation
  • Have the opportunity to apply your learning in a paid placement year before or after your final year, where you can apply your knowledge in a criminal justice organisation

New Solicitors Qualifying Exam (SQE)

The route to qualifying as a solicitor has changed for new applicants.

If you accept an offer on this course after 21 September 2021 you'll need to take the new Solicitors Qualifying Examination (SQE) after you graduate to qualify as a solicitor. The content and mode of assessment of many of our modules provide a good foundation for further specific SQE preparation.

If you completed or started this course, accepted an offer of a place, or paid a non-refundable deposit (international students only) before 21 September 2021 (inclusive) you can choose to take either the new SQE or the Legal Practice Course (LPC) after graduation.

95%

of graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course

(HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/2019)

Contact information

Admissions

+44 (0) 23 9284 5566

Contact Admissions

Facilities and clinics

Learn your craft in our courtroom

Replica Crown Court 

Watch this short video to discover our replica courtroom and see where you'll practise trials and take part in mooting competitions.

The benefits of having a replica Crown Court are that if one of our students wants to be a barrister in the future or a solicitor advocate, then it really gives them the opportunity to practise a trial and various court hearings in a courtroom setting.

Although this is a crown court, so it's a criminal court, we also use it for civil cases too. We're one of the only universities in the country that has a replica courtroom. This really gives students, when they go on from university, some really important skills that are valuable not only in a legal career, but also in a lot of other careers as well.

The student Law Society do a lot of activities in here, run mock trials, mooting competitions, and it gives our students really a chance to let their hair down and have a bit of fun in here.

We use the wigs, we use the gowns, we get a real judge in and we've got the cameras in here so you can go and film your performances.

You can -- it's a really good learning space. It's so lovely to see how our students grow in the years that they're with us. Our replica courtroom helps us to do that.

Develop your legal practice skills working with real clients

Legal Advice Clinic

Volunteer in our Legal Advice Clinic where you can help Portsmouth residents with their real legal problems, such as consumer or employment issues.

Watch this short video to find out how it works and what students think of the experience.

Gemma Hargrave (tutor):

The legal advice clinic is a live clinic. We have real life clients coming in. They ask us questions about any area of law. We have students who are from level six at the university who come in and work in the clinic. They do it as part of a module called the Law and Practise Module. Rather than doing a dissertation and writing 10000 words, they come into the clinic every week and work with clients to work out their problems.

Callum Goddard (student):

So I chose to take part in the legal clinic for a number of reasons, really, having gone through a sort of assessment process with a law firm, I realised in myself that I sort of had a lack of examples to draw on in terms of how I can demonstrate my competencies to future employers. So for me, it was really beneficial to get some proper legal experience.

Gemma Hargrave:

So, the student role at the clinic is as a legal advisor. They will see the client, they will gather information from the client and then they will go away and research the problem.

Jack Macfarlane (student):

What I gained from taking part in the legal advice clinic was very much the interpersonal skills that I developed from speaking with everyday people that had everyday issues.

Gemma Hargrave:

The legal advice clinic benefits students in their further studies and future careers because it gives them the opportunity to have real life experience of the law, but it lets them build on those skills that they've got, so skills that they will have to take into the workplace: communication skills, organisation skills, they'll know how to deal with a difficult client. These are all skills, whether they go into the law or not, that will really help them in their future careers.

Katie Yeoman (client):

The legal advice clinic has helped me on mainly discrimination law. Because I'm transgender, I face discrimination and I've taken action and they've helped me sort things out. Working with the students, they've responded really well, and if they didn't know what the answer was, they've gone away and they've either emailed me or phoned me. So the students have been really good.

Callum Goddard:

In terms of how the legal clinic has helped me and my future role now, I think the clinic was really great at building those core skills of a lawyer: conducting interviews, taking the time to research matters and then also having the confidence to deliver the legal outcomes. The clinic is unmatched really for how it can develop you in those areas.

Gemma Hargrave:

I'm incredibly proud of what the students have achieved over the years. We've written multiple witness statements for some clients that have enabled them to be able to keep contact with their children in the future. We have had one case where students were able to prevent, on the day, an illegal eviction of a client who would be homeless without that help. The students have been able to take what they've learnt in the clinic and then make a real impact in the community.

Law Photoshoot;19th November 2018

Community Lawyer module

Work with one of our partners to apply your learning by giving them legal advice. Partners have included the British Red Cross and Citizens Advice.

Learn more about the community lawyer module

Entry requirements

LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology degree entry requirements

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points from 3 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 29

You may need to have studied specific subjects – find full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English Language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers

  • A levels - BBB-BBC
  • UCAS points - 112-120 points from 3 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • T-levels - Merit
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) - DDM-DMM
  • International Baccalaureate - 29

You may need to have studied specific subjects or GCSEs - see full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept.

English language requirements

  • English Language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications.

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Ideal skills and qualities for this course

As well as meeting the entry requirements, we’re looking for excellent skills in academic reading and writing and the ability to think critically and express yourself clearly - verbally and in writing.

You do not have to be a confident presenter to get a place on this degree; we'll help you develop those skills throughout the course.

To prepare for this course, knowledge of current affairs and law in the news is useful. Reading a quality newspaper is a good starting point.

Worried about your grades?

If you're not sure you meet the entry requirements, or need some help to get uni-ready, then we offer this course with a foundation year to bring you up to speed. When you successfully finish, you'll get a guaranteed place on this course.

Explore LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology with Foundation Year

Smiling student in library in placements meeting

The course is very interactive. We have been able to engage with lawyers on a practical scale. I have had the opportunity to take part in the practical lawyer unit which enables me to engage directly in the field of legal advice which has greatly boosted my confidence.

Patricia Asekenye, LLB (Hons) Law

Careers and opportunities

Law is an incredibly flexible degree. If you don't believe us, take a look at our blog about the 7 reasons to study law.

When you graduate you'll be ready to take your next step to train as a solicitor, a barrister or a Chartered Legal Executive. It's worth noting that Chartered Legal Executives can now become judges, coroners, advocates and partners in law firms.

Law degrees are in the top 10 degrees for employability. You'll graduate with a wide range of transferable skills that will make you very employable across a range of other sectors. Your knowledge of criminology will be particularly helpful when applying for roles within the criminal justice system, such as the police or the probation service.

Graduates of this course have gone on to work for companies such as:

  • DC Kaye & Co
  • The Home Office
  • Surrey Police
  • Willis Towers Watson (risk management)
  • Invicta law
  • Parker Bullen LLP
  • Fidelity Investments
  • Herbert Smith Freehills LLP

Graduates of this course have secured jobs as:

  • trainee solicitor
  • legal executive
  • probation service officer
  • Border Force executive officer
  • police community support officer
  • account manager
  • paralegal
  • criminology teacher

Other graduates have continued their studies at postgraduate level or set up successful businesses with help and support from the University.

Meeno Chawla Headshot

Portsmouth gave me a real insight into how the law works in the real world. There were several opportunities to do work experience, network with professionals and attend talks about the profession. This is what made Portsmouth unique.

Meeno Chawla, Law LLB with Criminology

Female student at computer

Ongoing career support – up to 5 years after you graduate

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Work placement year

You can boost your employability even more by taking an optional paid placement after your second or third year of study.

Previous students have had placements in organisations such as:

  • Verisona Law
  • Opus 2 International
  • GE Capital
  • Oracle
  • Rolls Royce Motor Cars

Whatever your career ambitions, our placements team will be there to help and guide you and you'll maintain contact with your tutors throughout the year.

The average salary for a 12-month paid placement is £19,800 for students in the Faculty of Business and Law. It could be more or less than this amount depending on your placement. You'll only pay a very small percentage of your tuition fee for this year.

You could also choose to set up your own business, or take a voluntary placement.

Ways to enrich your study

Prague cityscape

Study abroad year

Between your second and third year, you can choose to study abroad at one of our partner universities in Europe, Asia, Australia or North America. All classes are delivered in English and you'll still be able to get both your tuition fee and maintenance loans. You may also qualify for a government travel grant.

 

"Students that go abroad are more likely to obtain first-class honours [and] more likely to be in graduate employment than their non-mobile peers."

 

Universities UK International: 'Gone International, Rising Aspirations', 2019

Modules

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Modules

Foundation year

If you're not sure you meet the entry requirements, or need some help to get uni-ready, then we offer this course with a foundation year to bring you up to speed.

  • You'll study on the University of Portsmouth campus with access to all facilities, support and societies
  • When you finish your foundation year successfully, you get a guaranteed place on LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology
  • Get used to how lectures, seminars and tutorials work, so you can move on to your degree ready for success
  • Learn how to meet the demands of taking on a bachelor's degree at university

Explore LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology with Foundation Year

Core modules

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to research primary sources and use those to construct legal argument

  • Demonstrate an understanding of key principles of contract law

  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the relevant law, apply it to problem situations and reach reasoned conclusions

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate understanding of criminal offences in terms of their definitional elements

  • Analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal rules and principles to assess potential outcomes in terms of criminal liability

  • Demonstrate the ability to research primary sources and use them to construct legal argument, both written and oral.

Explore this module

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 6.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and discuss the operation of the English Legal System, including classifications of law, the court structure and sources of law

  • Access, reference and use legal materials and other appropriate primary and secondary sources of information

  • Develop and present legal and contextual arguments

  • Consider different ways of learning and the role of feedback in improving learning and performance

  • Effectively read, comprehend, interpret and evaluate legal sources, such as statute law, case law and credible secondary source

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand key features and the operation of the British Constitution
  • Understand constitutional principles and how they apply within the UK constitution
  • Recognise the legal and non-legal forms of redress available against public bodies and bodies performing public duties in England and how such avenues of redress can be used in practical situations

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of key principles of the law of tort
  • Demonstrate the ability to research primary sources and apply those to tortious issues
  • Analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal rules and principles to assess potential outcomes in terms of tortious liability

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The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Outline the historical context and origins of the subject area.
  • Describe the key ideas that drove the development of the social sciences.
  • Think independently and creatively across discipline boundaries.
  • Recognise and apply new and existing knowledge in relation to explaining criminal behaviour.
  • Outline and describe the social, cultural, political and economic contexts that influenced the development of criminology and criminological thinking.

Core modules

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and rules of equity and the law of trusts
  • Use independent research to examine a particular aspect of the law of equity and trusts
  • Analyse problem situations and apply the appropriate legal principles to that situation in order to construct coherent and logical conclusions

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature and extent of the mechanisms for the protection of human rights in the UK legal system

  • Understand the role of the European Court of Human Rights in shaping UK human rights practice

  • Analyse the main methods and tools of human rights adjudication

  • Apply their knowledge and understanding of human rights legislation to problem scenarios in order to reach reasoned conclusions

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Show knowledge and understanding of the main principles and concepts of Land Law

  • Apply their knowledge and understanding of Land Law to communicate in writing a solution to a legal problem in a clear and concise manner

  • Compare and contrast the facts within a given scenario using statute and case law to recognise ambiguity and provide arguable conclusion

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop the skills necessary to engage in critical analysis of the law
  • Identify and apply a range of appropriate legal research methods
  • Access and retrieve relevant sources and assess their quality and authoritative value
  • Develop a range of legal writing skills relevant to professional communication and academic research

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The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Develop knowledge and understanding of the subject area that is reflective and questioning.

  • Think independently, analytically and creatively about the subject area.

  • Appraise different critical standpoints of social control.

  • Locate, access and critically engage with information pertinent to the subject matter.

  • Recognise and discuss the importance of social justice.

  • Develop and further intellectual curiosity for the subject area.

Optional modules

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Develop critical, reflective knowledge and understanding of state crimes concepts (of commission and omission), examining and critiquing the boundaries of subject knowledge in a disciplinary context.
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of commission, including crimes against humanity and State Crimes Against Democracy.
  • Appraise the nature of state crimes of omission, including state-corporate and environmental market-based crimes, contemporary slavery and trafficking of human beings.
  • Critically examine by synthesising existing knowledge to generate ideas and creative solutions in the international communities' response to state crimes that is infused with a sense of responsibility allied to a commitment to ethical practice and social justice.

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Recognise the varying disciplinary perspectives on the concept of security within a criminological framework.

  • Critically discuss the drivers of societal risk and insecurity.

  • Recognise the nature and impact of economic and political developments.

  • Explain and assess the many forms of threat to the security of states, corporations and individuals.

  • Identify and assess responses to security threats at the global, national, local, corporate and individual levels.

  • Locate, interpret, question and summarise information from a number of different sources.

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The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Develop knowledge of the principles and practices of penology.
  • Engage creatively with the multi disciplinary basis of the subject area.
  • Apply knowledge for the development of creative solutions to intractable problems.
  • Engage in an ethical evaluation of the justifications for punishment.

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Evaluate the history and sociology of policing organisations.
  • Explain the role, organisation, and governance arrangements of policing in the UK.
  • Analyse issues of trust and legitimacy within the police.
  • Identify and analyse major challenges confronting policing agencies nationally and internationally.

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Know and recognize the varying disciplinary perspectives on the concept of the principles of economic crime investigation within criminological, legal, and economic frameworks
  • Become familiar with the main types of organisations involved in investigating economic crime including SFO, NCA and FCA etc.
  • Identify the different modes of investigative techniques employed in investigating economic crime
  • Analyse information on the investigation techniques employed in real economic crime cases
  • Gather, retrieve, and analyse information from a variety of sources

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the different types of wildlife crime and summarise environmental factors
  • Recognise and examine the importance of environmental justice and sustainability
  • Locate, access and engage with information pertinent to environmental justice and wildlife crime
  • Interpret and assess new and existing knowledge
  • Demonstrate intellectual curiosity and identify further opportunities within the subject area

Explore this module

Core modules

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Critically evaluate theoretical approaches to understand the nature, impact, and place of the discipline in contemporary society.
  • Comprehensively critique the contributions of contemporary criminology to interpretations of late modern transgression and punishment.
  • Critically appraise the significance of challenges posed by cultural transformations on criminology as a discipline.

The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Navigate international human rights case-law and critically evaluate their impacts on national criminal justice systems.
  • Critically examine the reasons why human rights law fails to be enforced effectively within criminal justice.
  • Critically compare different international and regional human rights instruments in their involvement with criminal justice.
  • Critically assess how global issues affect the limitation of rights in criminal proceedings.
  • Contextualise crime by applying a critical approach towards rights by taking into account social inequalities.

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Exhibit knowledge and understanding of key concepts pertaining to the law and governance of the European Union

  • Identify and critically analyse European Union law principles as developed in the jurisprudence of the Court of Justice and scholarship

  • Demonstrate ability to apply the rules and principles of European Union law to realistic problem scenarios

  • Critically evaluate the underlying theoretical debates that inform and contextualize legal analysis and judicial reasoning in European Union law

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Optional modules

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver advocacy (oral and/or written) appropriate to a realistic criminal law trial/hearing, evaluating the theory of advocacy and professional ethics
  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver advocacy (oral and/or written) appropriate to a realistic civil law trial/hearing, evaluating the theory of advocacy and professional ethics
  • Critically evaluate own strengths and weaknesses, challenge received opinion, reflect on action and seek out and make use of feedback to improve on own performance and development in oral and/or written argument
  • Incorporate critical ethical dimensions in to advocacy (oral and/or written) to demonstrate an awareness of personal responsibility and professional codes of conduct with reference to theoretical and professional writing on advocacy

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate solid understanding of relevant rules and procedures and their effect on practical problems

  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal rules

  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant procedures

  • Draft formal legal documentation accurately

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate detailed understanding of the law and practice in key areas of commercial law

  • Critically evaluate the law relating to businesses and commercial transactions

  • Critically analyse complex factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal concepts in order to reach reasoned conclusions and provide advice and recommendations

  • Synthesise knowledge and understand of the law and apply complex statutory and case law material

  • Demonstrate an awareness and good understanding of current legal issues and problems relating to businesses and commercial transactions

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate detailed and coherent knowledge of substantive law, procedure and practice in one or more areas relevant to the clinical placement setting

  • Display the ability to critically analyse legal problems and identify appropriate legal and practical resolution strategies

  • Demonstrate an ability to effectively and appropriately communicate legal principles and advice to clinical placement service users

  • Reflect upon and critically analyse learning from experiential practice in the clinical placement setting, identifying areas of strength, and those to improve upon

Explore this module

 

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a sound understanding of the relevant legislative framework
  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal concepts
  • Resolve novel problems relating to relevant aspects of company law

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare equality laws and policies across the globe, with a view to critically evaluating how legal questions around equality rights are addressed in different jurisdictions

  • Achieve an in-depth understanding of different theories of equality and appraise their impact on existing anti-discrimination laws and their interpretation by national and international courts

  • Critically engage with classic and recent judgments on equality and non-discrimination from national and international courts, as well as with cutting edge scholarship on topical questions of equality law, with a view to making evidenced-based assessments of interpretative and policy developments in equality law

  • Demonstrate the ability to construct well-informed legal arguments, as well as the ability to engage with independent analytical and critical research with a view to producing robust legal analysis

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a wide-ranging ability to critically evaluate core concepts of data protection law by developing research, theoretical and practical understanding, so as to arrive at appropriate conclusions

  • Demonstrate an awareness of practice-related issues and challenges pertinent to data protection law and policy

  • Demonstrate a critical awareness and understanding of current/emerging legal and policy issues/challenges observable in the data protection field

  • Work independently, and be able to reach reasoned conclusions from complex theoretical or problem-based data protection law-related scenarios, and provide advice and recommendations

  • Demonstrate a comprehensive ability to form an argument through the research and synthesis of academic data protection law materials

  • Communicate effectively about data protection law related ideas and concepts in a way that is comprehensible to others with knowledge of the subject

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and critically analyse the key principles and concepts of discrimination

  • Understand the key protected characteristics, and critically analyse how they manifest in disputes

  • Understand the key protected characteristics, and critically analyse how they may conflict with each other

  • Be able to question and critically analyse the key case law

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an in-depth and systematic understanding of Family and Child law through independent research

  • Critically assess aspects of Family and Child Law

  • Evaluate Family and Child law in action

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the nature and extent of the mechanisms for the protection of intellectual property in the UK legal system

  • Critically examine the main intellectual property rights available in the UK

  • Develop logical and coherent arguments to support reasoned conclusions when answering problem or discussion based questions

  • Demonstrate the ability to research points of law by using a variety of online and offline sources

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the essential principles of the law governing the use of force and international humanitarian law
  • Undertake independent research in the field of international law
  • Critically examine rules of international law governing the resort to and conduct of an armed conflict
  • Demonstrate an ability to ground an understanding of the relevant law within contemporary, real - world contexts

Explore this module

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate detailed and coherent knowledge of substantive law, procedure and practice in one or more areas relevant to the clinical setting

  • Display the ability to critically analyse legal problems and identify appropriate legal and practical resolution strategies

  • Demonstrate an ability to effectively and appropriately communicate legal principles and advice to clients, lawyers and non-lawyers

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the law relating to intestacy and advise as to an intestate estate distribution
  • Explain key principles of the law of succession and evaluate the extent to which they apply to a particular scenario
  • Apply your knowledge and understanding of the law to problem scenarios, analysing these in order to provide coherent and logical conclusions

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Implement an effective research methodology which may, where appropriate, also include an empirical and/or interdisciplinary approach, to meet the research objectives of the dissertation
  • Display evidence of independent research through proper citation and discussion of relevant legal authorities and other appropriate primary and secondary sources
  • Provide a clear explanation of the areas of the law and other appropriate issues relevant to the dissertation
  • Demonstrate the ability to subject the law to effective doctrinal and critical analysis which, where appropriate, involves the synthesis of legal and contextual issues, and to formulate logical and reasoned conclusions and recommendations
  • Adopt a structure and writing style appropriate to a legal dissertation at undergraduate level

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Formulate a plan suitable for development into an extended essay

  • Display evidence of effective research through proper citation and discussion of relevant legal authorities and other primary and secondary sources

  • Provide a clear and accurate explanation of the areas of the law relevant to the project

  • Demonstrate higher level of intellectual skills drawn from a range of skills, including the ability to subject the law to effective doctrinal and critical analysis which, where appropriate, involves the synthesis of legal and contextual issues, and to formulate appropriate conclusions and recommendations

  • Adopt a structure and writing style appropriate to a piece of independent legal research at undergraduate level

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When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop a knowledge of both fundamental principles and specific regimes of international law

  • Undertake independent research in the field of international law and use this to inform written work

  • Explore and reflect upon key debates situated within the field of international law

  • Critically engage with contemporary developments in the field

Explore this module

 


Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

If you'd like to study a fully accredited law degree that covers all the foundations of legal knowledge, but combines this with an understanding of business and management our LLB (Hons) Law with Business may be the right degree for you. This is a great option if you're interested in going on to work in corporate law.

This fully accredited single honours LLB (Hons) Law degree is our most traditional, pure law course. We recommend this option if you're interested in going on to be a barrister, if you're an international student, or if you think you may want an academic career in the law.

This new and practically focussed LLB (Hons) Law with Legal Practice is specifically tailored to today's legal career pathways, preparing you for your next step as a solicitor or a chartered legal executive. Like our other law courses it includes all the foundations of legal knowledge, but gives you more practical experience of applying your knowledge. This course is ideal if you want to be a solicitor, a chartered legal executive, or a paralegal.

Teaching

Around 20% of your timetabled teaching will be online.

The majority of your timetabled teaching will be face-to-face and will include:

  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • workshops
  • practical sessions

We pride ourselves on the academic support we offer our students. You'll have a personal tutor, student engagement officers and study support staff to help you throughout your studies.

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who'll teach you on this course. To learn more about our teaching staff's active engagement in research and in addressing current legal challenges, explore our law blog.

Juliet Caroline Brook Portrait

Dr Juliet Brook

Associate Head (Academic)

juliet.brook@port.ac.uk

Portsmouth Law School

Faculty of Business and Law

PhD Supervisor

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Michael Connolly Portrait

Dr Michael Connolly

Associate Professor in Law

michael.connolly@port.ac.uk

Portsmouth Law School

Faculty of Business and Law

PhD Supervisor

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Shane Paul McKinder Portrait

Mr Shane McKinder

Shane.McKinder@port.ac.uk

School of Law

Faculty of Business and Law

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Assessment

The way you qualify as a solicitor has changed and we want to make sure that we prepare you as much as possible for the new SQE exams. The SQE exams are multiple choice, so we're adapting our assessment methods so that you're confident with this method of assessment.

Your assessment will depend on which modules you take, but it's likely to include:

  • exams
  • problem scenarios
  • written reports and essays
  • presentations
  • practical projects

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

We use a blended learning approach to teaching, which means you’ll take part in both face-to-face and online activities during your studies.  As well as attending your timetabled classes you'll study independently in your free time, supported by staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for this degree.

Your total study time will depend on the modules that you take, but in your first year this is what your week may look like:

  • timetabled teaching activities (seminars, tutorials, classes and workshops) = about 13 hours a week
  • independent study (research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group) = about 22 hours a week

You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Supporting you

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

Types of support

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you'll also have access to our student engagement officers. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing, and refer you to specialist support services if you need extra help or support.

You'll have help from a team of study support tutors. Based within the Faculty of Business and Law, these tutors are familiar with the specific requirements your assignments and work closely with faculty academics. This means they can give you focused support with the specific study skills you need to be successful on your course. They're available face-to-face, by phone, email, and by video call.

They can help with:

  • Academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations, projects and literature reviews)
  • Reflective writing skills
  • Critical thinking skills
  • Delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • Understanding and using assignment feedback
  • Managing your time and workload
  • Revision and exam techniques

If you're a mature student, specialist support to help you return to learning is available.

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University's Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University's library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from librarians who specialise in business and law.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

They'll help you to

  • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
  • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
  • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
  • liaise with external services

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

Course costs and funding

Tuition fees

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year, including our Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,200 a year (subject to annual increase)

You won't pay any extra tuition fees to another university for taking part in a study/work abroad activity if you choose to do it for the whole academic year. During a year abroad you'll only have to pay a reduced fee to the University of Portsmouth.

Funding your studies

Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module that you study.

You won't need to buy the core textbooks as you can borrow most books from our extensive library. 

If you choose to buy the course books they may cost up to £30 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

If you take a placement year or study abroad year, tuition fees for that year are as follows:

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £1,385 a year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £1,385 a year, including Transition Scholarship (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £2,875  a year (subject to annual increase)

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2024, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – M1L6
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Looking for this course with a foundation year?

Take a look at LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology with Foundation Year

To start this course in 2025, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – M1L6
  • our institution code – P80

Apply now through UCAS

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

Looking for this course with a foundation year?

Take a look at LLB (Hons) Law with Criminology with Foundation Year

Applying from outside the UK

As an international student you'll apply using the same process as UK students, but you’ll need to consider a few extra things. 

You can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

Find out what additional information you need in our international students section

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.