biomedical science student collecting data in lab
UCAS Code
B940
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

As a biomedical scientist, you’ll be on the frontline of research into the causes and consequences of diseases of the human body and you'll contribute to diagnosis and management of these conditions.

This BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science degree course gives you the knowledge, skills and experience you need for a career in this essential scientific profession and the accreditation to pursue a career in NHS laboratory medicine.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) and the Royal Society of Biology.

96% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2019)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this degree course, you'll:

  • Find out about the systems of the human body and the diseases that affect them
  • Learn about the latest professional practice in pathological disciplines such as haematology and microbiology on one of our optional sandwich placements
  • Receive award-winning teaching from active researchers and experts who are at the top of their game
  • Get out of the classroom and put your knowledge to the test in our labs, which are kitted out with industry-leading microscopes, spectroscopy and chromatography equipment

You can also:

  • Join one of our internationally recognised research groups
  • Apply to the Erasmus+ exchange scheme, involving a summer research placement at a European university
In the final stage of your course, you’ll carry out a laboratory-based research project. You can complete this project at a partner university in Europe through the Erasmus+ exchange scheme.

Careers and opportunities

You'll graduate from this course as a scientist in training with transferable skills that give you many career options.

You can apply to the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) to join the biomedical science register. This lets you practice as a qualified biomedical scientist when you graduate. You must have completed a period of work-based learning within one of our Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) approved clinical training laboratories to register.

You can also apply for Associate Membership of the Royal Society of Biology. This gives you access to professional networks and conferences.

What can you do with a Biomedical Science degree?

Areas you could go onto after the course include:

  • scientific research
  • further study on an MSc or PhD programme
  • teaching
  • scientific writing and the media
  • pharmaceutics
  • instrumentation
  • further study at medical or dental school

Our Careers and Employability service gives you support and advice for up to 5 years after you graduate, to help you put your best foot forward after your studies.

The lecturers support you and encourage you to get involved with the endless opportunities available, so you can make the most of your student experience, while also gaining key transferable skills.

Laura Porcza, BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply and source theme-specific scientific information in an appropriate manner to address key scientific problems
  • Demonstrate an in-depth and independent knowledge of the scientific and clinical material associated with three thematic clinical case studies
  • Effectively work as a member of a group and co-author a series of scientific reports to a suitable standard to demonstrate collaboration, subject knowledge and problem solving skills in this area
  • Critically evaluate your ability to participate in collaborative activities and apply the lessons learned to subsequent academic tasks
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, supervised time in a studio or workshops, and practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 3 x 800-word coursework projects (15% of final mark, each)
  • a 1-hour written exam (55% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll examine the structures and functions of biologically important molecules and enzymes, metabolic biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics and inheritance. You will be introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems excluding the central, peripheral and sympathetic nervous systems. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the structure and function of biologically important molecules, and the cellular locations and roles of the main metabolic pathways in animal cells, including the interrelationships between pathways
  • Describe and apply the principles of enzyme kinetics and factors effecting enzymatic reactions
  • Describe the main metabolic pathways in animal cells
  • Describe the structure and organisation of genetic material, the mechanisms of inheritance and concepts of biodiversity and natural selection
  • Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the human body using appropriate anatomical terminology
  • Utilise appropriate histological techniques and identify tissues according to their microscopic histological appearance
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 30-minute coursework assessments (20% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your knowledge of the aetiology and pathology of some of the major conditions that affect these systems. You'll equip yourself with a grounding in drug-receptor interactions, how the body handles drugs and learn about the processes surrounding drug discovery, clinical trials, and medicines regulation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the basic physiology and anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems using appropriate anatomical terminology
  • Describe the physiological process of nerve conduction and how drugs affect this transmission
  • Describe how chemical classes of neurotransmitters and their pharmacological analogues can affect the functioning of the central and peripheral nervous systems
  • Relate anatomical structure to the function of the central and peripheral nervous systems in human behaviour, and associated nervous system disorders
  • Examine how absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) is influenced by the drug formulation and how this informs therapeutic drug monitoring in patients
  • Describe basic concepts in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics (ADME)
  • Apply basic concepts in ADME, such as drug-receptor interactions, in the analysis of primary data including how drug formulation informs ADME and how this advises therapeutic drug monitoring in patients
  • Describe the role of animals in biomedical research and drug discovery, including the relevant legislation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 145 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour exam (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

The skills you'll gain in this module are beneficial for a variety of modules and courses.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Effectively research published information sources and prepare a well-written submission at a suitable level of academic and scientific writing, using appropriate learning resources and information technology
  • Solve key mathematical problems relating to biomedical science and demonstrate appropriate use of statistics in the analysis of lab data
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental chemistry and biochemistry underpinning biomedical science
  • Demonstrate engagement, learning and practice in basic lab techniques according to set protocols and in accordance with current good lab practice
  • Demonstrate key proficiency skills
  • Demonstrate engagement with the Personal Development Planning programme
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 282 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute exam (25% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute written exam (10% of final mark)
  • a 4,000-word coursework portfolio (65% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

You’ll critically examine the core biomedical science disciplines which are essential for Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) accreditation. This module is the first of three Pathological Science modules that span your whole degree.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the principles underpinning practical techniques relevant to pathology
  • Describe the structure and appearance of cells and tissues in reproductive, endocrine and haemopoietic systems
  • Describe the main haematological and biochemical parameters and how they relate to health, disease and nutrition
  • Describe microbiological parameters such as the structure, function and growth of pathogenic organisms and the methods used to classify them
  • Describe the structure and role of red cell membrane bound proteins and antigens
  • Describe the roles and components of innate and adaptive immune responses
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 126 hours studying independently. This is around 7.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 90-minute exams (50% of final mark, each)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll illustrate physiological mechanisms and disorders through practical investigation, including simulation. You’ll identify and discuss disorders of physiology in various types of body systems and sense organs.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain physiological processes relating to named organs and systems
  • Perform experimental procedures to illustrate specific physiological functions
  • Discuss the causes, underlying symptoms, diagnosis and pathophysiology of a range of human disorders
  • Analyse and discuss experimental results in physiology
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and seminars, and take part in a demonstration.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 140.5 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute exam (35% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (65% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop an understanding of the core biomedical science disciplines which are essential for Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) accreditation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the characteristics of the major groups of organisms (bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa) with focus on their virulence factors and the processes used to avoid the host immune system
  • Discuss the causes and consequences of defects in haemopoiesis, haemoglobin and cell survival
  • Explain how biological measurements can be used to inform a definitive diagnosis
  • Discuss the requirement for ABO and Rh testing in normal blood transfusion practice to provide compatible blood components
  • Discuss the role of red cell antibodies and their assistance in the destruction of red cells
  • Discuss the causes, pathophysiology, histological and biochemical investigation of disorders including those of the gastric, hepatic, pancreatic and red cell systems and disorders of intestinal function
  • Interpret and critically discuss clinical information and lab data in the context of a clinical case study
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 1 x 3,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the procedures that should be followed in answering a research question and performing a critical appraisal of published work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe core aspects of and design, ethics, data analysis, clinical trials and evidence-based medicine/practice
  • Write a protocol for a lab investigation
  • Demonstrate an understanding of health and safety in the lab
  • Select and apply qualitative and quantitative methodologies to a scientific investigation
  • Perform descriptive analyses using statistical software, apply appropriate statistical tests, interpret statistical output and draw conclusions to address the key research questions
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the processes involved in research including the critique of published research, developing a research questions and preparing a research proposal on a topic provided by the academic staff member
  • Explain the ethical considerations that apply to animal and human research with emphasis on the role and composition of the human tissue act
Teaching activities

In this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, research proposal guidance meetings, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll do an in-depth study of the immune system to understand how the individual components function together to identify and eliminate infectious agents. You’ll explore the immune system and the processes of acute and chronic wound healing as well as the processes of haemostasis and associated key disorders.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the key processes involved in the formation and functioning of the immune system and the consequences of its activity and inactivity
  • Discuss the form and function of the haemostatic system and the consequences of its dysfunction
  • Discuss the lab approaches used to investigate the function of the immune system
  • Discuss the lab approaches to investigate the function of the haemostatic system
  • Discuss and interpret immunology data and report findings according to a specified format
  • Discuss and interpret haemostasis data and report findings according to a specified format
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 148 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 90-minute coursework exercises (50% of final mark, each)

Optional modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to generate and integrate a variety of business information in an oral presentation
  • Demonstrate the ability to generate and integrate a variety of business information in written form
  • Interpret business information in the preparation of convincing argument for the success of a small business venture
  • Demonstrate successful collaborative working using enhanced communication, problem solving and team working skills
  • Constructively reflect on your own and others' performance to make "Smart Actions" for the future
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word coursework exercise (30% of mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore how functional organs and the adult body form emerges in the embryo, and discuss how deviations from developmental processes may result in major birth defects. You’ll also investigate how stem cells repair organs in the adult.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the phases of vertebrate/human development from fertilisation to organogenesis and explain differences between vertebrates
  • Discuss key concepts and molecular control mechanisms in developmental biology
  • Independently study a current problem in developmental biology
  • Design a team presentation on experimental approaches and suitable models
  • Apply basic laboratory skills in tissue preparation, observation and description
  • Discuss the application of developmental biology in understanding birth defects and in regenerative medicine
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (15% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (35% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written examination (50% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the integration of macro- and micro-nutrients in various metabolic pathways and their implications on health
  • Discuss changes in nutrient requirements during different stages of the life cycle and the long term health implications of the maternal and infant diet
  • Discuss the relationship between diet, physical activity and the development of disease
  • Discuss the health hazards associated with food manipulation, toxicology and allergic reactions to food components
  • Evaluate an individual's diet with reference to the current recommendations made by the Department of Health and explain the range of techniques used for the assessment of diet
  • Discuss the core concepts, principles, and applications, underpinning public health
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 151 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (25% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (75% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll prepare an in-depth study of the processes of cell growth and differentiation and how defects in these processes can lead to malignancy. For inherited disorders, you’ll examine how genetic lesions underpin the pathophysiology of selected disease states.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the pathophysiology of selected diseases arising from genetic defects
  • Critically discuss approaches to the diagnosis, screening and treatment of selected genetic diseases
  • Research and critically evaluate current literature relating to genetic disease
  • Compose and present written reports on topics in the field of genetic disease
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour coursework project (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

Your study of pathology will focus on aetiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, management, treatment and prevention strategies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss disease initiation and development at the molecular, cellular and systems levels
  • Critically discuss the approaches and strategies used for prevention and management of infectious diseases
  • Critically discuss an integrated approach to diagnosis and monitoring of selected disease states
  • Critically discuss the role of the pathology lab when testing for toxicity
  • Critically discuss current clinical and lab practices for stem cell and solid organ transplantation
  • Critically discuss the aetiology, pathology, diagnosis and management of selected complex and multi-system diseases
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 153 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute practical skills assessment (15% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (15% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

In the same way as Pathological Sciences 1 and 2, this module is pivotal to the understanding of the Biomedical Science core disciplines and is essential for Institute of Biomedical Science (IBMS) accreditation. This is the third of the three Pathological Science modules which you'll study on this degree.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss, using a range of examples, the cytogenetic and molecular basis of a range of haematological malignancies and how these influence classification, treatment and monitoring
  • Discuss the causes, classification, pathophysiology and diagnosis of disorders of the renal system including fluid, acid base and electrolyte metabolism
  • Recognise and critically discuss the pathogens most likely to cause disease in the major organs of the body and the chemotherapeutic agents employed for their treatment
  • Recognise the tissue characteristics of inflammatory conditions and malignant transformation associated with named cell and tissue types
  • Evaluate the genetics and inheritance of the ABO and Rh blood group systems and demonstrate an understanding of the production of blood components and pre-transfusion compatibility testing in minimising the risk of adverse transfusion reactions
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 8 x 1-hour practical classes & workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 4,000-word coursework exercise (100% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll learn to analyse the impact of basic scientific research on your understanding of diseases and their pathogenesis, and network with IBBS members and invited speakers to the IBBS seminar programme. You’ll use this experience to reflect on the impact of high quality biomedical research to the economy and society, while reflecting on your own technical and analytical skills in biomedical science and your career aspirations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss nationally and internationally relevant research on biomedical science
  • Investigate and critically discuss the output and research methodologies used by named investigators to address specific hypotheses
  • Reflect upon the IBBS seminars and provide discussion of the investigation and the networking opportunities that have resulted from attending these sessions
  • Discuss the relevance of the IBBS seminars and research subjects to your postgraduate opportunities
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and seminars. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word portfolio project (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll adopt a problem-based learning approach to explore the multifactorial pathways required to investigate, diagnose and monitor selected human pathologies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Source case-specific scientific information and use this in an appropriate manner to address key clinical problems
  • Demonstrate an in-depth, independent and critical knowledge of the clinical and pathological material associated with selected clinical case studies
  • Effectively work as a member of a group and co-author an evaluative clinical portfolio to a suitable standard
  • Include in your portfolio clinical case material to demonstrate subject knowledge, effective collaboration and problem solving skills
  • Reflect on your ability to participate in collaborative problem-based learning activities
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend a lecture, practical classes and workshops, and supervised time in a studio or workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 175 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word group portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

The project will normally be focused on a experimental and lab-based investigation. You’ll work closely with your host and home supervisors who'll provide guidance and advice on all aspects of the project (conduct, design, trouble-shooting, data analysis and presentation of data).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conduct a literature search on a topic relevant to biomedical science and critique the literature in a written publication-style project report.
  • Accurately describe, evaluate, and present the methodological approaches employed for the investigation, and their associated results, in an appropriately formatted publication-style report
  • Present and defend a biomedical science focused investigation in the format of a conference-style presentation
  • Proficiently and independently conduct an investigation relevant to biomedical science that takes into account current health and safety and ethical guidelines
  • Design, conduct experiments and/or use appropriate procedures to produce and investigate research questions and hypotheses in the field of biomedical science
  • Record and, using appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative tools, analyse and interpret data obtained from the investigation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend project supervision meetings, lectures, practical classes and workshops, and take part in a placement. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 359 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 7,000-word dissertation (80% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a project output other than dissertation (10% of final mark)

What you'll do

In this module, you will develop various practical, cognitive and transferable skills. You’ll also learn about the skills necessary for employment and develop reflective practice for continuing professional development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan, organise and negotiate a programme of work-based learning and selection of learning outcomes appropriate to your programme of work and award
  • Discuss the theory, practice and application of a specified range of work-related procedures/techniques
  • Critically reflect and evaluate your learning, strengths, weaknesses and performance, and identify your individual learning needs
  • Relate work-based knowledge and skills to your named award and career opportunities
  • Set personal objectives, manage time and tasks
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work based learning and attend tutorials and seminars. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 192.5 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

The project can focus on experimental and laboratory-based investigation, or be literature/questionnaire-based as long as it involves acquisition, analysis and evaluation of published or new data. You’ll work closely with your project supervisors who will provide guidance and advise on all aspects of the project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Conduct a literature search on a particular topic relevant to Biomedical Science and critically appraise the literature identified through this process in a written, publication-style project report
  • Accurately describe, evaluate, and present the methodological approaches used in the investigation and associated results, in a formatted publication-style report
  • Present and defend a biomedical science investigation in the format of a conference-style presentation
  • Proficiently and independently conduct an investigation relevant to biomedical science that takes into account current health and safety and ethical guidelines
  • Design and conduct experiments and/or use appropriate procedures to produce and investigate research questions and hypotheses related to the field of biomedical science
  • Record and use appropriate quantitative and/or qualitative tools to analyse and interpret data from the investigation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops, and take part in project supervision meetings.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 121 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 7,000-word dissertation (80% of final mark)
  • a 40-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • project performance/conduct (10% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop various practical, cognitive and transferable skills. You'll also learn about the skills necessary for employment and develop reflective practice for continuing professional development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Plan, organise and negotiate a programme of work-based learning and a selection of learning outcomes appropriate to your programme of work and award
  • Discuss the theory, practice and application of a specified range of work-related procedures and techniques
  • Critically reflect and evaluate your learning, strengths, weaknesses and performance and identify your individual learning needs
  • Relate work-based knowledge and skills to your named award and career opportunities
  • Set personal objectives, manage time and tasks
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials and seminars, and take part in work-based learning.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 192.5 hours studying independently. This is around 11.5 hours a week over the duration of the module

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework portfolio (100% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • essays
  • laboratory reports
  • workshops
  • presentations
  • group work
  • measures of practical competence

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

If you do your placement in an approved NHS pathology laboratory, you can complete the Institute of Biomedical Science registration portfolio.

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • practical lab work
  • guided reading
  • collaborative and peer-assisted learning
  • simulation

Our academic staff have expertise in clinical practice and research, and we provide a student-centred approach to teaching, with all modules fully supported by online lecture and study materials.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Biomedical Science degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, seminars and practical classes and workshops for about 14 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from the faculty librarian for science.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Biomedical Science degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • BCC-ABB from A levels, or equivalent, to include Biology plus a second pure Science subject or Mathematics. For A levels which include a separate science practical component, a pass is desirable and may strengthen an application.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £16,400 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll get free safety equipment at the start of the course. However, you may have to pay a small amount to replace lost or damaged equipment.

If you take optional work-based learning units, you’ll need to pay for travel to and from placements, which normally costs around £50.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – B940
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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