Bsc geography student with rock sample
UCAS Code
F800
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

If you’re interested in the physical nature, characteristics and environment of the world, you can couple your interest with professional skills on this professionally accredited BSc (Hons) Geography degree course.

You’ll learn about the natural environment, how it was formed, what threatens it and how we can protect it. You’ll deepen your understanding of the world and develop professional skills in areas such as communication, problem solving, decision making and teamwork.

When you complete the course, you'll be prepared for a career in everything from environmental management to teaching and academic research.

You could earn more than the average graduate too – 5 years after graduation, female geography graduates earn 11.6% more than a typical female graduate and male graduates earn 2% more than a typical male graduate (Institute For Fiscal Studies, 2018).

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Royal Geographical Society. This shows the teaching on this course is of the highest quality and has been approved by an independent body of academics and industrialists.

94% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2019)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this degree course, you’ll:

  • Study physical geography, nature, and how environmental changes will affect the future of our planet
  • Use high-powered tech in our labs, including laser survey technology, drones, GIS and photogrammetry equipment and environmental simulation cabinet
  • Tailor your studies, by choosing modules that match your interests and career ambitions
  • Have the chance to experience some of the societies or landscapes you’re studying by doing field work
  • Enrich your studies by hearing from guest speakers from public, private and non-profit sectors

You can travel overseas for field work in places such as Berlin, Malta, Sicily and Uganda and choose to study abroad at one of our link universities in Poland, Spain or France.

Careers and opportunities

What can you do with a Geography degree?

At the end of the course, you'll have many technical and professional skills you can use to start your career. Previous students have gone onto work in areas such as:

  • environmental management
  • business management
  • public services
  • teaching
  • research

What jobs can you do with a Geography degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • geographical information scientist
  • environmental consultant
  • spatial analyst
  • coastal process scientist
  • urban planner
  • transport planner

Organisations graduates have gone on to work for include:

  • Ordnance Survey
  • Department for Environment Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
  • IBM
  • The Environment Agency

You could also go on to study at postgraduate level.

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

I enjoy my course due to the range of modules, both human and physical geography, and as a coastal city, Portsmouth's location is great to study geography.

Ashley Purchase,

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Geography degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

Weekly tutorials will develop your skills in essay writing, referencing, presentations, searching literature, note taking, CV writing, as well as understanding plagiarism and academic practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply appropriate techniques to collect relevant academic source materials, making efficient use of library resources and online academic search engines for research purposes
  • Construct short essays that develop arguments with supporting evidence
  • Plan and deliver an individual presentation
  • Interpret the arguments, ideas and information in academic writing
  • Examine and implement core academic principles related to successful writing
  • Develop small group skills
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend tutorials, lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 173 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (33% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (34% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (33% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the basic concepts of systems analysis as applied to physical environmental systems including concepts of equilibrium, thresholds and change. You’ll examine physical systems at a smaller scale to introduce you to core terminology and the concepts required to understand the operation of physical environmental systems at the scale of human intervention.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the systems paradigm and its utility for understanding physical environmental systems
  • Apply the systems paradigm to the description and explanation of the structure and operation of physical environmental systems from the local to the global scale
  • Describe and understand the spatial and temporal variability of physical environmental systems and natural hazards
  • Describe and understand the nature of change in the physical environment and the basis of assessing evidence for such changes
  • Describe the basis for evaluating evidence in the physical environment
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and tutorials. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 158 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1-hour exams (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the nature and extent of human impact on the environment. You'll develop an understanding of the complexities of managing environmental, population and resource change at the local and global levels.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and summarise the main patterns and distribution of human populations, resources and environmental problems
  • Outline the contributions from natural and social sciences in providing an explanation of current environmental problems
  • Describe and begin to assess key elements of global environmental management
  • Critically evaluate literature relevant to the topic
  • Demonstrate an understanding of Global Environmental Challenges and communicate this effectively
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1-hour exams (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You’ll learn about the practical skills required for collecting geographic field data using both quantitative and qualitative techniques. Follow-up sessions will help you understand how these different kinds of data sets can be analysed.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Collect and record quantitative data in the field using a range of methods
  • Collect and record qualitative data in the field using a range of methods
  • Identify methodological limitations and be critical of the quantitative and qualitative data collected
  • Work both independently and as part of a team in the field, working effectively in groups, and evaluating one's own contribution and that of others to group outcomes
  • Communicate and reflect on your findings using scientific reports and poster presentations
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops and take part in fieldwork study.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a group poster (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore various sub-disciplines, considering the different approaches, methodologies and techniques that these offer to the study of major developments that have led to integrated global economic, social and cultural systems.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the relationships between economic, political, social and cultural formations, both in general and in particular places
  • Outline the significance of spatial and temporal scale
  • Describe the social construction, evolution and distinctiveness of place
  • Discuss the implications and problems of global processes for particular parts of the world
  • Describe the importance of geographical ways of thinking for understanding the contemporary world
  • Perform qualitative interviews as a geographical research method
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops, and you'll take part in external visits and supervised time in a studio or workshop.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written examination (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop skills in cartography, remote sensing, field surveying, experimental design, laboratory use, social science research methods, and statistics.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Select appropriate data sources for specific applications while appreciating their fundamental characteristics
  • Select methods and techniques for data acquisition, classification, analysis and display, being aware of the underlying assumptions/limitations
  • Identify the principles of research and experimental design
  • Evaluate the employment of key methods of quantitative and qualitative data collection and their appropriate applications
  • Identify the range of data sources available to geographers and the suitability of these for different application areas
  • Identify concepts of basic data description and presentation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word portfolio (33% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour computer test (34% of final mark)
  • a 500-word practical skills assessment (33% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

The second part will introduce you to the potential career pathways for Environmental Scientists and Geographers and give you the skills required to apply for jobs in the sector.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Observe, describe, record, survey, measure, investigate and relate environmental situations and problems in a prescribed, professional manner
  • Research and discuss environmental topics
  • Plan, undertake and write up a group research project
  • Competently complete Ethics and Health and Safety documentation for fieldwork activities
  • Critically evaluate the career options for Environmental Scientists and Geographers
  • Complete job applications, produce effective cover letters, CV, have experience of a mock graduate assessment day and subject specific careers fair
Teaching activities
  • 13 hours of lectures
  • 17 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 30 hours of fieldwork
  • 4 hours of practical classes
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 500-word oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also explore the concept of sampling, experimental/fieldwork design and data analysis/computer-based data handling techniques.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to: 

  • Plan, undertake and write up a research proposal, ethics and health and safety form
  • Systematically appraise the concepts of sampling and designing experiments/fieldwork investigations for environmental situations
  • Analyse and interpret data using statistical software
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1.5-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 7 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 1,500-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll expand your knowledge of palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental reconstruction techniques (including sediment coring, microfossil analysis and geochronology).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically evaluate the range of physical processes that can be reconstructed using sedimentary archives
  • Examine the context, scope and limitations of various reconstruction techniques
  • Critically evaluate and discuss the role of palaeo-data in providing a perspective on some current environmental concerns, and enhancing our predictive ability of future environmental change
  • Undertake multiproxy data analysis and interpretation
  • Demonstrate the use of various reconstruction techniques
Teaching activities
  • 13 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 hours of fieldwork
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 157 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word report (75% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module introduces you to the contemporary geographies of the developing world, focusing on sub-Saharan Africa. You'll develop a critical awareness of the complex, multi-faceted and often contested strategies employed in development. You’ll become critically engaged with core theories, development processes, debates at a range of geographical scales. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the difficulties that surround the conceptualisation and measurement of development over time
  • Examine the multifaceted, complex and sometimes highly contradictory nature of the various strategies which have been employed in the name of development
  • Critically appraise key debates in a number of contemporary development issues such as globalisation, trade and NGOs and the impact on countries, individuals and communities
  • Explore the relationship between development and the key social, cultural and contemporary issues affecting the global South at various geographical scales
  • Describe and analyse the impact of development processes at global, national, community, household and individual levels
  • Effectively use key skills including critical thinking, reflection and self-awareness, and group work
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written examination (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

Underpinned by a theoretical framework, you’ll be exposed to the capture, interpretation and analysis of geographical and environmental data from a variety of sources to explore current problems and challenges.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise the key theories and principles that underpin GIS and RS
  • Collect a range of spatially referenced GIS and RS datasets from various sources
  • Critically evaluate a range of GIS and RS techniques
  • Analyse spatially referenced data using industry standard GIS and RS software packages to understand current problems and challenges
  • Compose a professionally-presented portfolio showcasing the GIS and RS skillsets mastered on the module
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 163 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word portfolio (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop knowledge of glacial theory and current research in relation to climate change. Practical sessions will enable you to explore this information through an applied and interactive approach, underpinned by the latest research and debates on glaciers and ice sheets.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify different types of glacier landsystems based on their geomorphological signature
  • Genetically interpret glacial landforms and sediments based on knowledge of sediment transport pathways and depositional processes
  • Apply a glacial landsystem approach to make interpretations about glacier and ice sheet dynamics
  • Apply geographical information systems to investigate various aspects of glaciology and glacial geomorphology
  • Contextualise past and present changes in glacier extent in relation to past environmental change and current/future climate warming
  • Critically evaluate and reflect upon the glaciological and glacial geomorphological literature
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 20-minute practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how to access systematic statistical data on inequality in income, wealth and well-being, and how to calculate measures of inequality such as the Gini Coefficient. You'll also analyse the extent and causes of inequality in Great Britain since World War II, and the policies adopted by different British governments and local initiatives that have promoted and increased inequality.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate alternative definitions of a just economy, the ethical case for it and practical obstacles to achieving it
  • Identify and access alternative data sources on geographical inequalities globally and for Britain
  • Calculate and present alternative measures of inequality in incomes, wealth and well-being
  • Define the main dimensions of inequality in modern Britain at regional and local levels
  • Present a chronology of the development of UK regional and urban policies since 1945
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, project supervision meetings, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word report (75% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical set exercise (25% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about open channel flow, sediment transport processes and the form and dynamics of different river types. You'll also study different freshwater ecosystems and the potential effects of natural (floods and drought) and human influence (pollutants, climate change, wind farms, land management and habitat restoration) on them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret and appraise the fluvial processes and forms occurring in different environments and types of river, differentiate between their spatial and temporal variations and evaluate the effects of scale, location and external controls on fluvial characteristics
  • Examine and argue the applicability of theories, demonstrating an understanding of empirical and practical developments in fluvial geomorphology
  • Critically appraise a broad range of freshwater ecosystems and sampling techniques
  • Evaluate the potential effects of natural and anthropogenic inferences on freshwater ecosystems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 2 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 18 x 1-hour lectures
  • 5 hours of fieldwork
  • 5 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 158 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore social, cultural and economic well-being and consider who in society has what, where and why. You'll examine how people in different places and contexts are constructed and how they may contest and resist specific identity markers. You'll also explore public spaces, housing and town centres as examples of places that impact on peoples' well-being.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the roles of space, place and power in our lives
  • Demonstrate the ways in which gender, race, age, class, sexuality and disability are constructed and operate in society
  • Describe the interplay between place, social processes and individual experience
  • Demonstrate the ways in which urban, rural, housing and work spaces are constructed through cultural practices, individual and group identities and social imaginations
  • Explain the significance, including moral and ethical, of key social processes in developing an understanding of contemporary urban and rural living
  • Critically evaluate the role of policy in our lives
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework project (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Sustainability is a complex concept and on this module you’ll explore its origins as well as the conflicting viewpoints that surround it. You’ll examine contemporary issues in sustainable environmental management using a range of empirical case studies from different geographical regions.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate various theoretical perspectives on sustainable development
  • Examine and evaluate the contested nature of sustainable development in environmental management
  • Examine and evaluate the challenges of measuring sustainable development
  • Evaluate the complexity of the application of sustainable development to environmental management in different contexts
  • Synthesise the academic literature in order to identify and justify your position on the spectrum of sustainability views
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, surgery (drop-in sessions), practical classes and workshops, and take part in fieldwork study.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll have the opportunity to employ appropriate learned research methods and skills in the production of a major independent academic study.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop and execute an effective and realistic research design for their chosen field of study
  • Select and manage information, competently undertake research tasks with minimum guidance
  • Assess health and safety and ethical considerations in pursuing independent research
  • Critically evaluate their findings in the context of the available academic literature relevant to the selected theme of study
  • Critically evaluate evidence to support conclusions and/or recommendations, reviewing its reliability, validity and significance
  • Compose a small thesis in accordance with academic conventions
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and project supervision meetings. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 388 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 9,000-word dissertation (100% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll look into the basic science of the climate, the evolution of the climate, the signature of recent human influence, and the methods used to model the climate, in the context of global and regional climates. You'll also conduct a supervised regional vulnerability study to understand and fix deficiencies in climate protection.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify the major physical processes that determine the Earth's climate and its evolution through history
  • Evaluate and compare the methodologies that can be used to determine the climates of the past
  • Critically assess the degree to which human activities have contributed to climate change, as well as possible ways to reverse human-caused climate change, including geo-engineering proposals
  • Systematically evaluate the characteristics and limitations of various types of climate models, through the development of global and regional climate change scenarios using software packages such as MAGICC and SENGEN
  • Combine information from a variety of sources, including outputs from climate models, to develop a vulnerability-under-climate-change assessment for a given region
  • Critically appraise global initiatives to limit climate change
Teaching activities
  • 19 x 1-hour lectures
  • 24 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 157 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

A combination of field experience and lectures provide the support you need for the analysis and evaluation of these environments. Compulsory fieldwork (costs apply) takes place in either an arctic or alpine (mountainous) cold environment.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain how physical processes at work in cold environments produce a range of atmospheric and environmental phenomena
  • Deconstruct the complexity of arctic and/or alpine environments through evaluation and analysis of marked temporal and spatial variability in environmental characteristics
  • Critically evaluate the complexity of physical environmental issues in mountain and/or arctic environments
  • Critically evaluate research methods and approaches taken to investigate atmospheric and environmental phenomena in a high altitude and/or latitude context
  • Design an appropriate research project to investigate environmental phenomena and their spatial and temporal consequences
  • Demonstrate critical appreciation of how to make accurate field observations appropriate to a microclimate investigation, and analyse/interpret these observations with reference to physical processes
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and take part in fieldwork, practical classes, workshops and field trip preparation.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 133 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2000-word project output (60% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written examination (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the ecological concepts that impact species distributions and habitats. A field trip will develop your skills and understanding of human factors that impact species, and you'll translate biogeographical data to determine practical solutions to conservation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the basic principles of biogeography, including anthropogenic factors
  • Critically evaluate the biogeography and conservation literature
  • Analyse and creatively interpret biogeographical data
  • Communicate biogeography principles effectively, in a style suitable for multiple audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 172 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework report (60% of final mark)
  • a coursework project (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

The two-week practical field class to Uganda in East Africa provides a unique opportunity to develop your knowledge, skills and experience with challenges of managing the environment in a developing country context. The cost of this optional module is between £2,300-£2,500 and includes flights, transfers, in-country travel and accommodation, all meals/drinks and medical requirements.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically discuss the conceptual and theoretical underpinnings of global environmental governance frameworks and their impact on developing country environmental policies
  • Critically evaluate the difference between policy rhetoric and the reality on the ground through research experience in Uganda
  • Demonstrate the ability to collect your own data in often challenging developing country contexts, and subsequently critically analyse and assess it
  • Reflect on your positionality and its impact on the research process in the critical reflection component of your individual report
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops, and take part in fieldwork study.

 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 73 hours studying independently. This is around 4.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework report (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn data analysis skills that will be valuable when working in this field.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Perform an environmental audit to comprehensively evaluate the impacts of human activities on the environment
  • Carry out calculations to analyse CO2 emissions from a variety of sources
  • Evaluate environmental data from a variety of sources and apply simple methods of risk evaluation
  • Apply statistics to systematically analyse environmental data
  • Carry out an impact assessment to critically analyse the environmental impact of new developments/processes
Teaching activities
  • 16 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 3 hours of fieldwork
  • 16 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 149 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word essay (60% of final mark)

 

What you'll do

You’ll examine how they interact with biota to constitute an environmental risk. You’ll explore the waste management hierarchy and the scientific/technical processes involved with waste management operations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine the main environmental pollutants
  • Critically evaluate how pollutants are transferred within and between various media
  • Review routes through which pollutants interact with biota to constitute an environmental risk
  • Analyse the waste hierarchy concept and synthesise strategies that evolve from it
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and take part in external visits. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assessment including essay (50% of final mark)
  • a 500-word oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll explore the broader context of GIS development and recommend innovative design concepts. You’ll experience practicals that develop your understanding of digital technologies and problem-solving skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically assess the implementation of GIS in both the public and private sector organisations
  • Systematically critique the latest trends in the implementation of GIS and remote sensing at the national scale
  • Evaluate GIS software and communicate findings in a professional manner
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops, and take part in external visits. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll pay particular attention to the ways that geography shapes and is shaped by discourses of childhood, and children and young people’s everyday experiences. You’ll critically examine current theories, literature and policy surrounding childhood and youth.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and illustrate how notions of space and place are implicated in the construction of contemporary understandings of childhood and youth
  • Critically reflect on, how notions of space and place shape everyday experiences for younger people
  • Identify the diversity of children and young people, internationally and at the local scale
  • Illustrate the agency of children and young people as social actors in their own right
  • Critically reflect on, articulate and analyse their own geographical experience as young people and relate this to contemporary popular debates surrounding childhood and youth
  • Effectively work as a member of a group to communicate geographically informed perspectives on contemporary debates surrounding young people to a public audience via Web 2.0
  • Analyse and articulate their own process of learning
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes and workshops, and take part in fieldwork study.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 171.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll focus on the ways that wellbeing is formed and constructed, and the ways in which it varies spatially.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the social and biomedical models of health
  • Critically assess the numerous, sometimes competing explanations for socio-spatial inequalities in health
  • Critically evaluate how geography and geographers can contribute to an understanding of local and global patterns of chronic and acute morbidity (including infectious disease)
  • Critically evaluate the nature and role of therapeutic landscapes in understanding how place effects health
  • Critically evaluate how geography can contribute to everyday public health practice and how geographers should communicate public health research to lay audiences
  • Critically appraise the recurrent interplay between individual and place characteristics when understanding the risk of engaging in health risk behaviours
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word report (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at how these hazards are expressed onto landscapes and the effect they've had on past a present human populations and civilisations. You'll also explore the nature of natural hazards through a range of spatial and temporal scales.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine the nature of hazardscapes over a range of spatial and temporal scales
  • Critique the driving mechanisms of hazards over a range of temporal and spatial scales, including the role of feedback mechanisms
  • Conceptualise and propose a specific hazardscape by drawing upon existing knowledge from diverse research disciplines
  • Illustrate a bespoke hazardscape via a graphic depiction
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 165 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word coursework exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word coursework project (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop fundamental skills needed to be a teacher, and the capability to structure and deliver a short lesson.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the expectations of a professional teacher in terms of skills, knowledge and conduct
  • Discuss the importance of safeguarding students
  • Apply fundamental concepts of teaching and learning theory to plan an effective, peer-assessed lesson
  • Deliver lesson plans with clear objectives, student-centred learning and assessment of learning
  • Reflect on the use of active learning methods within subject specialism
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 10 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a written assignment including essay (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn about open channel flow, sediment transport processes and the form and dynamics of different river types. You'll also study different freshwater ecosystems and the potential effects of natural (floods and drought) and human influence (pollutants, climate change, wind farms, land management and habitat restoration) on them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Interpret and appraise the fluvial processes and forms occurring in different environments and types of river, discriminate between their spatial and temporal variations and evaluate the effects of scale, location and external controls on fluvial characteristics
  • Examine and argue the applicability of theories and demonstrate an understanding of empirical and practical developments in fluvial geomorphology
  • Evaluate the link between river processes and river management and demonstrate how the knowledge acquired in this module can be used in the workplace
  • Critically appraise a broad range of freshwater ecosystems and sampling techniques
  • Evaluate the potential effects of natural and anthropogenic inferences on freshwater ecosystems
  • Interpret and analyse data and draw scientific conclusions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 18 x 1-hour lectures
  • 5 hours of fieldwork
  • 5 hours of external visits
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • coursework
  • examinations
  • contributions to electronic discussion forums
  • web page design
  • posters
  • projects
  • presentations
  • portfolios

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

Previous students have completed work placements at organisations such as:

  • The Environment Agency
  • Natural England
  • The Solent Forum

We’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and opportunities that will complement your studies and build links with employers and the industry.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • workshops
  • seminars
  • one-on-one tutorials

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who’ll teach you on this degree course. 

Clare Boston, Senior Lecturer

Clare specialises in glacial processes, landforms and sediments. Her research includes work on past glaciation in Britain and recent glacier change in Norway and Greenland, and encompasses fieldwork, remote sensing and GIS.

Clare teaches on the following modules: L4: Practical Fieldwork Skills, Tools for Geographical Enquiry, Environmental Processes and Hazards, L5: Glaciers and Glaciation, L6: Independent Study (dissertation).

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Geography degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, practical classes and workshops and external visits for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from the faculty librarian for science.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free English for Academic Purposes programme to improve your English further.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Geography degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112-120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

The cost of travel or accommodation for compulsory fieldwork is included in the course fee, but you will be expected to pay for meals and other subsistence costs.

If you take a placement year, you’ll need to budget for the travel, accommodation and subsistence costs associated with the placement. These are generally £50–£1000, depending on destination and duration.

On some of the optional units in the final year of the course, you’ll need to contribute to the cost of field trips. These costs are often £30–£2,200. You can take optional units in your final year that have no field trips.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – F800
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

This site uses cookies. Click here to view our cookie policy message.

Accept and close