law with business students
UCAS Code
M1NC
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Law and business share a close relationship. Business knowledge is important to law firms as commercial law is the largest legal sector in the UK. Knowledge of the law is also extremely important to businesses. You can combine both on this LLB (Hons) Law with Business degree course.

The course is a qualifying law degree (QLD). It fulfils the requirements of the academic stage of training as specified by the Solicitors Regulation Authority and Bar Standards Board. This means that you can progress to the Legal Practice Course (LPC) or the vocational stage of training for the bar without additional study.

As well as core legal subjects, you’ll study key business and management topics and get to choose from various optional modules to suit your own interests. These currently include Commercial Law and White Collar Crime.

After the course, you could continue your legal training or take up employment in areas such as finance, commerce, recruitment or the public sector. You could also continue your studies on a Master’s degree.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by Bar Standards Board and Solicitors Regulation Authority.

95% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

What you'll experience

On this course, you can:

  • Bring what you learn to life in mock trials in our replica of a crown court, complete with dock, witness box, public gallery, jury room and interview room
  • Use your skills advising members of the public on a variety of aspects of the law, by working in one of our community settings
  • Opt for the CILEx Graduate Fast-track Diploma (Level 6 Diploma in Legal Practice) in your final year, which allows you to qualify as a Chartered Legal Executive lawyer when you get further experience after the course
  • Join our student law society and take part in team competitions such as negotiation and mooting
  • Study business subjects such as human resources management, marketing and business operations alongside law

Careers and opportunities

After the course, you could progress to a graduate training scheme, go straight into employment in the private, public or voluntary sector, or continue your studies.

If you chose a career in law, you can do the Bar Professional Training Course (BPTC) or Legal Practice Course (LPC), which are the traditional routes to becoming a barrister or solicitor.

If you take the CILEx Graduate Fast-track Diploma module in your final year, you can work as legal executive or paralegal when you graduate and become a Chartered Legal Executive lawyer following 3 years of qualifying employment. This gives you similar career opportunities to barristers and solicitors.

What jobs can you do with a Law with Business degree?

Roles our graduates have taken on include:

  • chartered company secretary
  • solicitor
  • barrister
  • legal executive
  • paralegal
  • insurance analyst
  • company secretarial associate
  • project manager
  • operations manager

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

If you're interested in setting up your own business while you study, you can get support on this course from the Entrepreneurs in Residence programme. Our Entrepreneurs in Residence are experienced business professionals who work with us to deliver group workshops and 1-to-1 drop-in clinics to help you plan and market your business idea.

What you'll study on this LLB (Hons) Law with Business degree course

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll develop knowledge and understanding in this area, providing an understanding of why the English legal system is what it is today, while also developing wider study skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand and discuss the operation of the English legal system, including classifications of law, the court structure and the sources of law
  • Access and use legal materials and other appropriate sources of information contained in hard copy and electronic formats
  • Develop and present legal and contextual arguments
  • Consider different ways of learning, and the role of feedback in improving learning and performance
  • Effectively read, comprehend, interpret and evaluate complex primary legal sources such as statute law and case law
Teaching activities
  • 23 hours of lectures
  • 23 hours of seminars
  • 23 hours of practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 131 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,500-word written assignment (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge and understanding of these principles, so you're able to provide advice to fictional clients, focusing on the application of principles, current issues in contract law and problematic situations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to research primary sources and use those to construct legal argument
  • Demonstrate an understanding of key principles of contract law
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the relevant law, apply it to problem situations and reach reasoned conclusions
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment
  • a 90-minute written exam

What you'll do

You'll develop knowledge and understanding of these principles to provide advice to fictional clients.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of criminal offences in terms of their definitions
  • Analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal rules and principles to assess potential outcomes in terms of criminal liability
  • Demonstrate the ability to research primary sources and use them to construct legal argument, both written and oral
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll be introduced to key constitutional principles and the legal and political issues related to the operation of the British Constitution. You'll also learn about the processes for addressing a citizen's grievances or complaints (mechanisms of redress) that are available to citizens against public bodies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Access and use paper and electronic sources related to the operation of the British Constitution
  • Describe key features of the British Constitution
  • Explain constitutional principles and how they apply within the UK constitution
  • Recognise the legal and non-legal forms of redress available against public bodies and bodies performing public duties in England, and explain how such avenues of redress can be used in practical situations
Teaching activities
  • 23 hours of lectures
  • 23 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll explore the relationship between theory and management practice by selecting and applying appropriate theory in an organisational context, using this application and analysis to identify key issues and develop appropriate recommendations for action. You'll reflect on your own perspectives and experiences from working in organisations, being managed and/or managing others, and exploring these in the context of effective management and the achievement of individual and organisational goals.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Explain the nature and context of working and managing in organisations with diverse membership, including consideration of equality, diversity, cross-cultural and ethical issues in the management of people
  • Select, examine and apply appropriate theoretical and conceptual frameworks used in the analysis, discussion, and potential resolution of people management issues, within an organisational context
  • Identify and apply some key activities of people management practice (from a managerial perspective), and consider their potential impact in achieving organisational goals, and the role of line managers in their implementation
  • Review contemporary issues in managing people in organisations and identify the implications of these for managers and other employees
  • To encourage students to reflect on their own perspectives on working in organisations and managing others, exploring these within the context of effective management and the achievement of individual and organisational goals
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 40-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You also look at the applications of these principles and rules, and the current issues and problem situations around them.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Access and use paper and electronic primary sources relating to the law of tort
  • Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the principles of the tort of negligence
  • Assess the duties which are imposed, and the interests which are protected by other torts
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify the relevant law and apply it to problem situations in order to provide arguable conclusions
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge and understanding of these principles, and apply it to give advice to a fictional client.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the main principles and concepts of Land Law
  • Apply your knowledge and understanding of Land Law to communicate in writing a solution to a legal problem, in a clear and concise manner
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify where the law is ambiguous or in need of reform and make appropriate proposals for change
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll use your knowledge of these concepts to develop an insight into the future of the law industry.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Examine and evaluate key propositions underlying strategic management theory and practice in national and global contexts
  • Appraise strategic issues at business and corporate levels using appropriate frameworks and evidence to identify, develop and recommend strategic options
  • Propose appropriate strategies for issue resolution and the strategic changes needed for their implementation
Teaching activities
  • 24 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at the core rights provided by international documents such as the European Convention on Human Rights and implemented via the Human Rights Act 1998, as well as the role of common law as an alternative means for protecting fundamental rights. You'll also look at the principle of equality as it's expressed in the Human Rights Act 1998, the Equality Act 2010 and common law.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the nature and extent of the mechanisms for the protection of human rights and equality in the UK legal system
  • Appreciate the role of international and European institutions in shaping UK human rights and equality practice
  • Understand the main methods and tools of human rights and equality adjudication
  • Express critical knowledge of the interpretation given to human rights and anti-discrimination legislation, in light of the foundational principles of dignity and equality
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour seminars
  • 4 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll look at questions about the purpose of organisations of all types, then consider how they are led and governed. You'll also gain an understanding of related concepts, including stakeholder theory, corporate social responsibility (CSR) and ethical decision making, as well as issues of practical application such as stakeholder management, strategic CSR and social accounting.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of social, environmental and economic challenges affecting modern business
  • Construct an assessment tool for the comparison of organisations against the theoretical frameworks of ethics, governance and sustainability
  • Analyse and identify the wider stakeholder implications of alternative business models
  • Assess the role of leaders and the impact of leadership on organisations
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops 
  • 11 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word report (45% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word written assignment (55% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll then apply these principles to problematic situations, using your knowledge of statute and case law to develop your analysis. This core module follows on from the core Land Law module which is also studied in year two.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the principles and rules of equity and the law of trusts
  • Use independent research to examine a particular aspect of the law of equity and trusts
  • Analyse problem situations and apply the appropriate legal principles to that situation in order to construct coherent and logical conclusions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

These skills will be needed for your final year professional and research based modules.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Develop the skills necessary to engage in critical analysis of the law
  • Identify legal issues worthy of further investigation and research
  • Access and retrieve relevant sources and assess their quality and authoritative value
  • Develop a range of legal writing skills relevant to professional communication and academic research
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 1-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour seminars
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 161 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word written assignment (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word portfolio (80% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Access, use and critically evaluate primary and secondary sources relating to the normative framework of the European Union (EU) and the development of EU law
  • Evaluate judicial interpretations of primary and secondary EU law and accomplish an up-to-date and in-depth understanding of the relevant developments in the fields covered in the syllabus
  • Critically appraise EU substantive law relating to the fundamental freedoms and demonstrate an appreciation of the interplay between economic freedoms and the social dimension of EU law
  • Apply the rules and principles of EU law, as these have been developed and interpreted by the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), to realistic problem scenarios and critically analyse the issues raised by such interpretation in scholarly debates, in the context of essay questions
Teaching activities
  • 10 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn about shares and share capital, shareholder remedies, capital maintenance, corporate governance, loan capital, and corporate rescue and insolvency. The seminars will draw on directed reading and independent research and will provide opportunities for debate, the analysis of case studies, small group discussion, problem solving and role play.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a sound understanding of the relevant legislative framework
  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal concepts
  • Resolve novel problems relating to relevant aspects of company law
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word written assignment (45% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (55% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll identify, discuss and critically examine all major intellectual property (IP) rights, including patents, trademarks, copyright, design rights, passing off and the law of confidence. The module makes reference to other jurisdictions as a way to critically evaluate the IP framework in the UK, as well as to international treaties and other external legal sources.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and understanding of substantive UK intellectual property law
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the different forms of intellectual property law in protecting ideas from unauthorised use
  • Develop logical and coherent arguments to support reasoned conclusions when answering problem or discussion based questions
  • Demonstrate the ability to research points of law by using a variety of online and offline sources
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll also critically reflect on the human rights issues involved in family and child law.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an in-depth and systematic understanding of family and child law through independent research
  • Develop and present critical analysis of different aspects of family and child law
  • Identify and apply relevant law to scenarios in order to reach coherent and logical conclusions
  • Demonstrate insight on family and child law in action
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 2,000-word written assignments (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You must pass all assessments and pass the CILEx Client Care Skills assessment to satisfy CILEx accreditation requirements.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a solid understanding of relevant rules and procedures and their effect on practical problems
  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal rules
  • Critically analyse factual situations and identify and apply relevant procedures
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 195-minute written exams (50% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You must pass the assessment for this module and for CILEx Level 6 Practice to satisfy the CILEx accreditation requirements and get the CILEx graduate fast track diploma. During seminars you'll take part in practical activities, discussion of issues and preparation of documents.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Produce a written evaluation of a simulated negotiation
  • Recognise aspects of best practice in negotiation
  • Communicate information in writing to a client clearly and coherently
  • Produce a record of a telephone negotiation for a client file
  • Prepare effectively for a client meeting
  • Deal appropriately with client complaints
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 4 x 1-hour seminars
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 5,000-word written assignment (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also develops skills appropriate to civil and criminal court or tribunal appearances.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver advocacy (oral and/or written) appropriate to a realistic criminal law trial/hearing, reflecting the theory of advocacy and professional ethics
  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare and deliver advocacy (oral and/or written) appropriate to a realistic civil law trial/hearing, reflecting the theory of advocacy and professional ethics
  • Critically reflect on your own performance and development, in oral and/or written argument
  • Critically engage with the personal development of advocacy skills, with reference to theoretical and professional writing on advocacy
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word portfolio (40% of final mark) - including videos of a criminal advocacy meeting
  • a 1,500-word portfolio (60% of final mark) - including videos of a civil advocacy meeting

What you'll do

You'll explore the nature of the employment contract and how its grown independently of commercial contract principles. Using contractual and statutory sources, you'll look at traditional and modern employment issues, involving the modern 'gig' economy, the gender pay gap, dismissal, redundancy, and the rights of part-time, temporary, and zero-hours, workers

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Investigate paper and electronic primary legal sources relating to the employment relationship
  • Differentiate and discriminate between the principles of contract and statute law as problem solving devices in the regulation of the employment relationship
  • Interpret and apply the law to realistic problem scenarios
  • Conduct independent research into developing principles of common law and statutory interventions
  • Provide analysis of various legal principles and developments in the field of employment
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop skills such as client interviewing and management, note taking, report writing, legal letter writing, and in some cases administration and document drafting. You'll be expected to contribute to the achievement of the partner organisation's aims and objectives and develop your confidence in communication and the critical application of legal theory to practical problem.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse legal problems, synthesise new and existing knowledge and consider and develop alternative practical solutions
  • With limited guidance, manage detailed research in relevant areas of law and communicate clearly and effectively in a range of forms and to different audiences
  • Develop legal skills such as drafting, interviewing, negotiation and communication and be able to work in a range of environments responding positively
  • Reflect on and critically analyse your learning, identifying areas of strength, and the areas you'll need to improve for future employment
  • Undertake assessment of the practical skills you demonstrated with the external partner your worked alongside
Teaching activities
  • 3 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 391 hours a week working independently. This is around 24 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll use your academic legal knowledge to help members of the local community, developing skills such as client interviewing and management, note taking, report writing, legal letter writing and document drafting. You'll also be responsible for marketing clinics to the community, getting an understanding of how a client base is founded and developed, and increasing your confidence in communication.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically analyse clients’ enquiries and carry out research to identify and apply relevant legal rules and procedure which is documented, and communicated to the client in an appropriate format
  • Demonstrate a range of practical legal skills, including: interviewing, report writing, legal research, drafting, file management and effective communication
  • Reflect on and critically analyse your learning from the module, identifying areas of strength, and those that you need to improve upon
Teaching activities
  • 1 x 2 or 3-hour clinic sessions a week
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 9 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 267 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 4,000-word coursework exercise (25% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (25% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll study the historical background and main principles of corporate criminal liability such as the doctrine of identification and the rules of attribution used to establish the criminal liability of corporations. You'll also look at the rules that govern the criminal proceedings of corporations and how they can be sentenced.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the law and procedural rules governing corporate criminal liability
  • Critically examine the current law and procedure
  • Apply your knowledge and understanding of the law in the field of white collar crime to complex problem scenarios to reach reasoned conclusions
Teaching activities
  • 12 hours of lectures
  • 24 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop commercial awareness and relevant legal and academic skills.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a detailed knowledge of the law and practice in key areas of commercial law
  • Critically evaluate the law relating to businesses and commercial transactions
  • Analyse complex factual situations and identify and apply relevant legal concepts in order to reach reasoned conclusions and provide advice and recommendations
  • Understand and apply complex statutory and case law material
  • Demonstrate an awareness and understanding of current legal issues, as well as problems relating to businesses and commercial transactions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • examinations
  • coursework essays
  • presentations
  • participation in mock trials
  • written moot arguments

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark. You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 53% by written exams, 7% by practical exams and 40% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 41% by written exams, 2% by practical exams and 57% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 44% by written exams and 56% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year with support from our placements office.

You'll get support in choosing and applying for placements that fit your aspirations, whether you want to work in a legal or non-legal context.

Work experience and career planning

Our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience to boost your career prospects further.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary roles that will complement your studies.

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • tutorials
  • clinical legal training
  • practical learning in our replica court

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who'll teach you on this course.

Juliet Brook, Principal Lecturer

A solicitor specialising in property law before moving into lecturing, Juliet has lectured on both the post-graduate Legal Practice Course and the LLB, and teaches Land Law, Equity & Trusts, and the Law of Succession. Her research covers various aspects of succession law.

 
Dr Michael Connolly, Senior Lecturer
Michael is a specialist in equality and discrimination law. He has trained judges, advised Parliamentary committees, and published many papers and books on the subject. He is an experienced teacher of equality, employment, contract and commercial law.

 
Dr Marnie Lovejoy, Senior Lecturer
Marnie is a dual-qualified solicitor who specialises in transnational financial crime. She lectures in criminal law and white collar crime. Her research interests include corruption and embezzlement of public funds and the legal problems arising from the global nature of these crimes.
 

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Law and Business degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and workshops for about 15 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You’ll have regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor. They’re also available by appointment if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Student engagement officers

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have support from student engagement officers. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing, and refer you to specialist support services if you need extra help or support.

Study support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty study support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from librarians who specialise in business and law.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Entry requirements​

LLB (Hons) Law with Business degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 120 points from 3 A levels or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English Language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What skills and qualities do I need for this law with business degree course?

In addition to meeting the course entry requirements, you need good academic writing and reading skills as well as the ability to think clearly and express yourself clearly – in writing and verbally.

We'll support you in developing these skills further throughout the course.

How can I prepare for a law degree?

To prepare for this course, it's useful to keep up-to-date with current affairs, business and law in the news. Reading a quality newspaper online or in print is a good starting point.

You could also read these preparatory books:

  • Nick McBride, Letters to a Law Student (4th Edition, 2017)
  • Catherine Barnard, Janet O'Sullivan and Graham Virgo (eds.), What about Law? (2nd Revised Edition, 2011)

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2020 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,300 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You'll be able to access some of these in the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – M1NC
  • our institution code – P80

If you’d prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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