female Pharmacist standing in a pharmacy
UCAS Code
B230
Mode of Study
Full-time
Duration
4 years full-time
Start Date
September 2021
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Are you interested in the how and why of diseases, and how to treat them? Do you want to embark on a career where you use your interpersonal skills and knowledge of medicines to improve people's health?

Pharmacists are experts in medicines. They're vital for ensuring quality and safe supply of medicines within the law, and advising patients and fellow medical professionals on the correct use of medicines. They also offer health advice to patients.

This Master of Pharmacy (MPharm) honours degree course, which is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC), gives you the medical knowledge and practical skills you need to begin a career as a pharmacist.

You'll study topics including medicinal chemistry, pharmaceutics and therapeutics, and develop patient-focused clinical skills and clinical management skills in lectures, workshops and lab classes.

You'll practise your skills and apply your knowledge using the equipment and facilities you'll use in your career, such as a fully stocked model pharmacy, consultation rooms and a simulated hospital ward, GP surgery, and care home. You'll also interact with patients and members of the public on campus and on short community and hospital-based placements, and check and dispense prescriptions as you shadow qualified pharmacists.

After the course you can undertake pre-registration training and qualify as a GPhC-registered pharmacist within a year, or work in areas such as drug development or marketing.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC).

100% Graduates in work or further study (DLHE, 2017)

TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

92% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2020)

Entry requirements​

MPharm (Hons) Pharmacy Master's degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • BBB-AAB, or equivalent, to include A level Chemistry, plus an A level in a second Science subject or Mathematics. Other qualifications are considered including BTEC Extended Diploma in Applied Science at DDM-DDD plus A level Chemistry. For A levels which include a separate science practical component, a pass is desirable and may strengthen an application.

*Please note: A levels in Applied Science, General Studies, Critical Thinking and Citizenship Studies are not normally accepted.

Selection process
  • All shortlisted applicants will need to attend an interview, which will include an admissions test. Applicants must pass Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) check before starting the course.

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English Language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What you'll experience

On this course, you'll:

  • Be taught by pharmacy-qualified staff who have backgrounds in community and hospital pharmacy settings
  • Practise patient assessment skills on medical manikins and work-through realistic scenarios in our safe and secure Centre For Simulation In Healthcare
  • Get workplace experience by training in our fully stocked model pharmacy – you'll work through complicated cases in study groups, review hospital medication charts, and respond to medicine information queries
  • Interact with patients and members of the public with our local community pharmacy partners
  • Work alongside students from other healthcare disciplines, giving you an appreciation of all stages of the patient experience
  • Check and dispense prescriptions with real medication under the supervision of General Pharmaceutical Council (GPhC) registered pharmacists
  • Go on placement in general practitioner surgeries and a mental health hospital in your final year in addition to community and hospital placements in other years across the course
  • Complete a final year project tailored to your interests and career ambitions
  • Develop transferable skills you can use in any area of your life and career, including communication and time management skills, leadership ability, resilience, and self-confidence
  • Have the opportunity to learn a language and earn credit towards your degree as part of the University's Institution-Wide Language Programme
Pharmacy

Students and staff at the School of Pharmacy and Biomedicine talk about our Pharmacy MPharm (Hons) course.

The pharmacy course at the University of Portsmouth is designed for our students who are interested in public health, helping patients get the most out of their medicines and general wellbeing of our patients of today.

What I love most about the pharmacy course is you can learn around each subject as you wish.

The facilities at the University of Portsmouth are state of the art. We have the mannequins so we can treat them, we have arms as well so we can take blood pressure, we have heads so you can look in otoscopes. We also have the labs for the chemistry elements of the course as well.

Students have the opportunity to practice within a safe simulated environment, on each other or with our simulated patients when they come in to volunteer.

Three qualities a student needs to succeed on the course would be: organisation, probably time management, and being able to adapt to different scenarios.

We offer a huge opportunity within placements, and they spend a whole week in a community setting and that can be with a large multiple or one of our local pharmacies. In addition to that, within a hospital setting too.

Be yourself, try your hardest and everything will be alright. If you need any help there will always be someone to help you.

Careers and opportunities

Demand for qualified pharmacists is increasing. After the course, you can become a fully qualified pharmacist within a year by doing pre-registration training and passing the GPhC registration examination.

Many graduates do split pre-registration training in general practitioner surgeries and other clinical settings. You can also split pre-registration training between the pharmaceutical industry and a hospital or community setting.

Our Careers and Employability Service can support you in applying for the pre-registration training, helping with interview techniques and the application process. You'll get help, advice and support for up to 5 years after you leave the University.

Other career options

The expanding responsibilities of pharmacists means you'll have many other job options at the end of the course. Areas you could work in include:

  • Drug development and formulation
  • Involvement with toxicity studies
  • Clinical trials
  • Marketing
  • Regulatory affairs
  • Medical writing

Work experience and career planning

You'll get plenty of experience dealing with patients and the public on this course. 

Possible placement locations include:

  • Community pharmacies in Portsmouth and the surrounding areas
  • Local hospitals such as Queen Alexandra in Portsmouth, St. Richard's in Chichester, Southampton General Hospital, and Royal County Hospital in Winchester
  • GP surgeries in Portsmouth and surrounding areas
  • Solent NHS Trust’s mental health in-patient services

You'll also have the chance to volunteer in the local community, providing health checks to groups such as homeless people.

Our Careers and Employability Service can help you find further work experience opportunities during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships and voluntary opportunities – including a summer research placement at a European university – that will complement your studies and build your CV.

I love the freedom to learn around each subject... We all have to do the same modules but how you approach each module is up to you. 

Jonathan Alemika, MPharm Pharmacy student

What you'll study on this MPharm (Hons) Pharmacy degree course

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Due to changing circumstances as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, we may need to make changes to courses to ensure your safety and to ensure compliance with Government guidelines. We'll provide you with as much notice as possible of any such changes. Your course leader will inform you of these. Changes may include things such as modules being taught in teaching block 2 instead of teaching block 1 and teaching activities occurring in smaller group sizes.

Modules currently being studied

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll examine the structures and functions of biologically important molecules and enzymes, metabolic biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics and inheritance. You will be introduced to the basic anatomy and physiology of major body systems excluding the central, peripheral and sympathetic nervous systems. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the structure and function of biologically important molecules, and the cellular locations and roles of the main metabolic pathways in animal cells, including the interrelationships between pathways
  • Describe and apply the principles of enzyme kinetics and factors effecting enzymatic reactions
  • Describe the main metabolic pathways in animal cells
  • Describe the structure and organisation of genetic material, the mechanisms of inheritance and concepts of biodiversity and natural selection
  • Describe the basic anatomy and physiology of the human body using appropriate anatomical terminology
  • Utilise appropriate histological techniques and identify tissues according to their microscopic histological appearance
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 136 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 30-minute coursework assessments (20% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll review the roles and responsibilities of health care professional roles for patient care, personal development planning and continuing professional development.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use skills analysis and reflection to identify your learning needs and develop appropriate action plans and strategies to address them
  • Demonstrate effective learning techniques to address identified needs including evidence of satisfactory attendance at tutorial and workshop sessions
  • Evaluate actions taken to address learning needs
  • Access, evaluate, select and share information from a range of academic and practice based sources including books, journals and electronic resources
  • Identify and begin to reflect on the roles and responsibilities of different professions involved in the delivery of patient care
  • Apply core mathematics and statistical skills to solve scientific problems
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and supervised time in a studio or workshop, and take part in external visits. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 138.5 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute exam (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
  • a portfolio (pass/fail) - will include satisfactory attendance and completion of various assignments
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also look at how drug molecules are incorporated into medicines (formulated into dosage forms) for safe and effective administration to patients.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Distinguish between different types of dosage forms including their characteristics and routes of administration
  • Describe and apply different compounding procedures commonly used for extemporaneous formulations
  • Explain the physicochemical principles behind the manufacture of liquid and disperse systems and their stability, with associated pharmaceutical calculations
  • Demonstrate competence in the use of pharmaceutical calculations for extemporaneous preparation and dispensing of medicines
  • Construct a simple aqueous formulation for the dispensing of a drug using principles of preformulation, colouring, flavouring and sweetening
  • Demonstrate competence in the use of the British Pharmacopoeia and other official resources, and in the completion of Batch Record Sheets (BRSs) and construction of Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs), and part of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and Good Laboratory Practice (GLP)
  • Describe the various materials, suitability and procedures used in packaging different types of dosage forms and requirements of the Medicines Act 1968 with respect with labelling and packaging
  • Provide an overview of the drug development process from molecules to medicines by pharmaceutical industries and the importance of pre-formulation and accelerated stability testing
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 134 hours studying independently. This is around 4 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)
  • a 500-word practical coursework exercise (15% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute in-class test (25% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll develop your knowledge of the aetiology and pathology of some of the major conditions that affect these systems. You'll equip yourself with a grounding in drug-receptor interactions, how the body handles drugs and learn about the processes surrounding drug discovery, clinical trials, and medicines regulation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the basic physiology and anatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems using appropriate anatomical terminology
  • Describe the physiological process of nerve conduction and how drugs affect this transmission
  • Describe how chemical classes of neurotransmitters and their pharmacological analogues can affect the functioning of the central and peripheral nervous systems
  • Relate anatomical structure to the function of the central and peripheral nervous systems in human behaviour, and associated nervous system disorders
  • Examine how absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) is influenced by the drug formulation and how this informs therapeutic drug monitoring in patients
  • Describe basic concepts in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics (ADME)
  • Apply basic concepts in ADME, such as drug-receptor interactions, in the analysis of primary data including how drug formulation informs ADME and how this advises therapeutic drug monitoring in patients
  • Describe the role of animals in biomedical research and drug discovery, including the relevant legislation
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 145 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour exam (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also use knowledge gained from introductory science modules, such as Cells to Systems, Introduction to Formulation, Pharmaceutical Chemistry and Introduction to Neuroscience and Pharmacology.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Define professionalism and identify appropriate behaviours for pharmacists and pharmacy students
  • Describe the socio-behavioural aspects of health and illness and their treatment with medicines
  • Describe the role of the pharmacist in health care
  • Demonstrate a 'patient safety' approach to the supply of medicines against prescriptions
  • Demonstrate suitable communication skills, to allow patients to make safe and effective use of prescribed medicines
  • Demonstrate competence in pharmaceutical calculations relating to the supply and administration of medicines
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops, tutorials and take part in external visits. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 130 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3-hour practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour exam (pass/fail, pass mark of 70)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Case studies are carefully selected to coincide with other core modules, encouraging integration.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work safely and effectively in a lab, collecting and recording lab data appropriately, using suitable units for measurement and carrying out simple molar/concentration calculations, demonstrating competence in specified practical skills
  • Describe the principles of atomic and molecular structure, and predict the shapes of simple molecules
  • Recognise functional groups and show how the structure of a molecule can influence its physical and chemical properties in the context of pharmaceutical chemistry
  • Explain the basic concepts of bioinorganic chemistry in the context of pharmaceutical chemistry
  • Explain basic concepts in structural and mechanistic organic chemistry and relate this to pharmaceutical applications and biological processes
  • Explain the basic principles of biochemical equilibria and energetics
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 132 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1000-word coursework report (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll consider principles of chemical synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of drug molecules, and their radiolabelled congeners. You'll also examine the challenges of processing, sterilisation, disinfection, preservation and formulation.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the basic principles of molecular design when applied to the synthesis of therapeutic compounds
  • Review some of the chemical-synthesis strategies in drug development
  • Apply basic spectroscopic principles to identify and explain the infrared (IR), proton and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectroscopy (MS) patterns associated with typical drug molecules
  • Undertake specified aseptic (contamination free) processing techniques and evaluate sterilisation and aseptic processes in pharmaceutical formulation, including quality control
  • Discuss the formulation of inhaled medicines and the devices used for delivery of the drugs
  • Discuss the handling and use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and treatment
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 142 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (80% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (20% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute practical skills assessment (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

This module gives you an understanding of immunology and microbiology and how they link with current pharmaceutical and medical approaches.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Outline the basic principles of immunology and the pathogenic mechanisms involved in various inflammatory diseases
  • Synthesise key principles of immunology and pathogenic mechanisms to investigate specific human conditions
  • Discuss the rationale, benefits and limitations of immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory therapies
  • Outline the basic principles of microbiology and the pathogenic mechanisms involved in various microbiological diseases
  • Explain the significance of microorganisms and their interactions with human hosts including where microorganisms cause disease and how disease may spread
  • Discuss the lab techniques used for the isolation and identification of microorganisms
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 147 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)
  • 2 x 30-minute exam (15% of final mark, each)

What you'll do

You'll improve skills such as information retrieval and interpretation, problem solving, medicines supply, communication and team-working. You'll look at various aspects of pharmaceutical care, from choice of pharmacological class and formulation, prescribing and dispensing, and patient counselling and monitoring.

You'll also take part in an inter-professional education (IPE) activity where you'll learn with students of other healthcare professions about the team approach to patient care within the NHS.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Reflect on the meaning of pharmaceutical care in primary and secondary care sectors
  • Reflect on continuous professional development (CPD) and personal development planning (PDP) in the role of the pharmacist
  • Compare and contrast clinically important features of therapeutic drug monitoring with high-risk agents
  • Show competence in using pharmacokinetic calculations
  • Appreciate the importance of drug interactions and adverse drug reactions (their generation, monitoring, identification and reporting)
  • Understand the complexities of therapeutics, solve therapeutic problems and optimise drug therapy in individual patients while identifying and employing appropriate information sources
  • Understand the management, supervision and supply of controlled drugs to patients and other health professionals
  • Analyse and evaluate public health needs and create solutions from targeted pharmacy services
  • Effectively investigate and report on a current health or social care issue as part of a multi-professional team
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in a placement and attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 310 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 30-minute practical exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute practical skills assessment (35% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (35% of final mark)
  • a 500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail)

What you'll do

You'll then look at the pharmacology (the uses and effects) of the classes of drugs commonly used in treating these conditions. You'll revisit the conditions later in the MPharm programme in the development of therapeutic frameworks and clinical skills such as Medicines Use Review (MUR), clinical review and prescribing.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Differentiate between the causes and pathology of common conditions associated with the central nervous, endocrine and gastro-intestinal systems
  • Differentiate between the classes of drugs used to manage the common conditions associated with the central nervous, endocrine and gastro-intestinal systems
  • Outline the pharmacology of drugs used to manage common conditions associated with the central nervous, endocrine and gastro-intestinal systems
  • Discuss the therapeutic uses of drugs in the management of common conditions associated with the central nervous, endocrine and gastro-intestinal systems
  • Define the constituents of a healthy diet and lifestyle and assess the need for dietary supplements or total parenteral nutrition
  • Apply pharmacological and therapeutic knowledge in basic patient focused case studies
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 146 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 30-minute coursework exercises (15% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn the pharmacology and therapeutic use of major drug classes in the management of these systems. You'll also develop your skills in responding to patient case studies using pharmacological and therapeutic knowledge.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the physiological functions and the cooperation and control mechanisms between the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems
  • Evaluate the causes and pathology of common conditions associated with the respiratory, renal and cardiovascular systems
  • Identify the pharmacology of the classes of drugs used to manage the common conditions associated with the respiratory, renal and cardiovascular systems
  • Compare and contrast the pharmacotherapeutic uses of drugs in the management of common conditions associated with the respiratory, renal and cardiovascular systems
  • Apply pharmacological and therapeutic knowledge in basic patient focused case studies
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 149 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 30-minute coursework exercises (15% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

As a future Pharmacist you'll get an understanding of where your clinical practice fits in with the role of other healthcare professionals in ensuring the health of patients.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare and contrast the mechanisms of action of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents
  • Understand the mechanisms of how organisms can acquire resistance to antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents
  • Apply the principles that underlie the choice of safe and effective antimicrobial agents to successfully formulate treatment plans for infectious diseases
  • Understand the need for, and process of development of, new antimicrobial agents
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 90-minute practical skills assessment (100% of final mark)

What you'll do

This module builds on the physicochemical science covered in the Pharmaceutical Science and Pharmacology modules. You'll use knowledge and applications from areas of quality assurance analytical methodology, chemical behaviour and the pharmacological activity of molecules. 

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the molecular design basis for synthesis of therapeutic compounds
  • Synthesise and formulate examples of therapeutically useful drug substances, and critique the methodologies used in the discovery of drugs and future trends
  • Understand the science and associated lab-centred methodology to obtain synthetic and natural pharmaceutical compounds
  • Demonstrate the fundamental principles, experimental methods and applications of selected spectroscopic and analytical techniques for drug analysis
  • Show natural products and their classes as a source of medicinal agent and their clinical applications, including the value of preparing derivatives with better treatment potential
  • Outline the types and effects of toxic compounds occurring in plants and fungi and their consequences on health
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, seminars and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 300-word coursework exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a 200-word coursework exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop practical skills in a series of simulated workshops. You'll also take part in practice visits in hospitals and community pharmacies where you'll shadow pharmacists in a working environment and use your experience to engage in reflective learning.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe the legal and organisational basis of the provision of pharmacy services in primary and secondary care
  • Through simulation, demonstrate practical competence in the delivery of pharmaceutical services commonly provided in primary and secondary care settings
  • Identify, plan and implement continued professional development (CPD) activities by critically reflecting on your future professional practice in primary and secondary care roles, including maintaining competency in pharmaceutical calculations
  • Explain the analytical processes of pharmacoeconomics and their application in developing therapeutic guidelines
  • Demonstrate continued satisfactory engagement in your CPD and Personal Development Plan (PDP)
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in a placement and attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 311 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word written assignment including essay (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
  • a 500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 70)
  • a 90-minute practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll need good knowledge of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology and focus on the formulation and manufacture of solid oral dosage forms, as well as the basics of transdermal drug delivery. You'll make tablets, analyse them, and subject them to quality assurance procedures for the manufacturing process.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate the formulation and manufacture of solid oral dosage forms (tablets and capsules), including release profiles and the significance of British Pharmacopoeia (BP) tests for the evaluation of the dosage forms
  • Evaluate the rationale, design and clinical potential of specialised preparations for mucosal, parenteral and transdermal administration
  • Use analytical techniques employed in the quality assurance of drugs (or metabolites) in complex media
  • Discuss the relevance of biopharmaceutics in dosage form design
  • Formulate strategies to ensure and test the stability of pharmaceutical products, including interpretation of data generated, and an evaluation of techniques employed
  • Discuss the current and future use of gene delivery in the treatment of disease
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-hour written exam (100% of final mark)
  • a 500-word coursework exercise (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

You'll be introduced to the principles of research, focusing on pharmaceutical and pharmacy practice research, and to wider aspects of professional practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Describe and demonstrate understanding of research methodologies available for solving pharmacy-related problems, and their uses and limitations
  • Outline and relate the stages involved in designing, planning, ethically reviewing and carrying out a research project through the production of a research proposal
  • Identify research funding sources and cost research proposals appropriately
  • Review, critically evaluate and apply appropriate methods to collect, process, analyse and interpret research data, including hypothesis generation, statistical testing and qualitative data analysis
  • Select appropriate methods for communicating the results of research to both specialist and non-specialist audiences
  • Show awareness of the importance of considering professional ethical issues
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and seminars. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (100% of final mark)

Year 4

Core modules

More information about this module will be available soon.

What you'll do

You'll use case studies to examine the multidisciplinary, multiagency, multi-sector nature of health and social care provided to patients. You'll look at the considerations that must be made at all stages of the treatment of mental health and neurological conditions, using the evidence available and working with often incomplete datasets.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Evaluate current thinking on the aetiology, pathophysiology and features of major mental health and neurological disorders
  • Evaluate the evidence-base of drug and non-drug treatment options for mental health and neurological disorders
  • Evaluate the current thinking on the causes of substance use and misuse, as well as the current and potential strategies available for the management of these disorders
  • Evaluate the contribution of pharmacists to the management of individual patients suffering from mental health disorders, neurological disorders or substance use and misuse, when providing patient-focused care using a therapeutic framework approach
  • Critically discuss the potential role(s) of the pharmacist within the multidisciplinary team caring for patients in relevant clinical environments
  • Evaluate the challenges of formulation and drug delivery in patients with mental health and neurological disorders and the established and potential solutions to these
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in a placement and attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 158 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word written assignment including essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)
  • a 500-word coursework portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)

What you'll do

You'll also read, assess, interpret or use research data from pharmaceutical sciences and pharmacy practice, building on knowledge gained in other modules to support your argument.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Generate hypotheses or research questions for individual research on a pharmacy-related theme
  • Demonstrate personal responsibility for planning, conducting and reporting on a research project carried out within time and resource constraints, to budget and to plan
  • Critically evaluate and reflect on project methodology and findings in the context of current knowledge, and where appropriate, suggest further work for investigation
  • Communicate research findings in a written form to a given specification, including justifiable arguments and critical debate
  • Communicate research findings orally, to a given specification
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops, and supervised time in a laboratory or practice setting.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a data collection assessment (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
  • a 6,000-word dissertation (80% of final mark)
  • a 20-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also see science in practice as you follow a drug through its pharmacology, pharmaceutics and ultimately clinical pharmacy practice.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the genetic basis to underlying patient variability and its impact on therapeutic efficacy
  • Critically evaluate the value of patient stratification and personalised medicine in terms of detection, clinical outcome, adverse drug reactions, drug development and pharmacoeconomics
  • Evaluate current thinking on the development of biomarkers for disease, therapy and toxicity, including their detection in biological systems such as by liquid biopsy
  • Evaluate critically the therapeutic utility, risks and limitations associated with the major groups of anticancer chemotherapeutic agents currently in use
  • Critically discuss the potential role(s) of the pharmacist in solving problems presented by individual patients in the context of patient focused care plans for the multidisciplinary team
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework report (20% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (30% of final mark)
  • a 60-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • Diagnostic tests
  • Written assignments
  • Simulated patient-focused case studies
  • Oral and poster presentations
  • Online tests
  • Clinical skills assessment

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Practical laboratory work
  • Simulated training

All of the modules you'll take are fully supported by online lecture and study materials, and our academic staff will share their expertise in practice and research.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

For more about the teaching activities for specific modules, see the module list above.

Many teaching activities, including lectures, are recorded so you can re-watch them at any time.

How you'll spend your time

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Pharmacy degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as tutorials, lectures, practical classes and workshops and external visits for about 16 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • Teaching block 1 – September to December
  • Assessment period 1 – January (and early February for some courses in 2020/21 only)
  • Teaching block 2 – January to May (February to May for some courses in 2020/21 only)
  • Assessment period 2 – May to June

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from the faculty librarian for science.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2021 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – awaiting confirmation 
  • International students – £17,600 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll get free safety equipment at the start of the course. However, you may have to pay a small amount to replace lost or damaged equipment.

You will be expected to pay for travel costs to and from your placement. This will be in the region of £50.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2021, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – B230
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS or apply directly to us (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.

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