Science student using lab equipment
UCAS Code
Y100
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
4 years full-time, 5 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2019, September 2020

Overview

If you've got the ambition to be a scientist, but don't have the grades or qualifications you need for a Bachelor's science degree, then this BSc (Hons) Science with Foundation Year course is the best place to start.

In your science foundation year, you'll study a variety of scientific disciplines, and get the skills and knowledge you need to take on a full science degree in year 2.

You'll learn about biology, chemistry, earth sciences, psychology, sport and exercise and health sciences so you can decide what science degree you want to pursue after your foundation year in science.

You'll get your hands on world-class scientific equipment, and conduct studies and research in our laboratory facilities.

If you want to be a professional scientist, this degree with science foundation year could be your launchpad. Whether you dream of researching the next advance in medicine, see yourself helping elite athletes reach their peak, or want to work towards tackling some of our planet's greatest challenges, start your science journey on this course.

What you'll experience

On this Science with Foundation Year degree course you'll:

  • Do a foundation year, covering biology, chemistry, earth sciences, psychology, sport and exercise and health sciences
  • Have the flexibility to choose what science-related degree you want to study from year 2 onwards
  • Get knowledge of many different scientific principles and practices and build the relevant skills and understanding to use them
  • Study alongside students from other scientific interests and backgrounds
  • Brush up on your study skills and learn how to meet the demands of taking on a degree at University
  • Get valuable transferable skills in numeracy, IT, communication, research, teamwork, and planning
  • Learn from staff and lecturers with industry and research knowledge
  • Have the opportunity to learn from visiting guest lecturers and experts

Careers and opportunities

There's never been a better time to become a scientist. Science and technology are key areas of the UK economy and likely to be even more important in the future as low-skilled jobs decline. There's a shortage of science graduates across various fields, and many sectors are struggling to recruit professionals.

Whatever area of science you're interested in, your science foundation year will prepare you to take on a degree and career in the discipline of your choice. You could also go onto further study after you complete your degree.

You'll get help and support from our Careers and Employability service in finding your first role and for 5 years after you leave the university.

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Science with Foundation Year degree course

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Units currently being studied

Core units in this year include:

  • Study Skills for University
  • Introduction to Natural Sciences
  • Numeric and IT Skills for Scientists
  • Introduction to Human Sciences
  • Foundation Research Project
  • Foundations in Biology

The units you study in years 2, 3 and 4 (and year 5 if you do a placement year or choose an integrated Master's degree) will depend on which science degree you choose at the end of year 1.

On this course, you could do an optional work placement year between your 3rd and 4th years, depending on which science degree you choose at the end of year 1. This allows you get valuable experience working in the industry relevant to your chosen science degree.

For example, Environmental Science students have taken placements at organisations including Mott MacDonald and Enitial and Sport and Exercise Science students have completed placements with Portsmouth FC, England Volleyball and the Hampshire Football Association.

Whatever science degree you choose, we’ll help you secure a work placement that fits your situation and ambitions. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and opportunities that will complement your studies.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this science foundation course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • laboratory classes
  • tutorials
  • workshops

You'll be taught by experts that have both industry and research experience across many scientific disciplines.

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and practical classes for about 15 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in further years, depending on what science degree you choose at the end of your foundation year.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends.

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from the faculty librarian for science.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Cafe offers free advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

How you're assessed

You’ll be assessed through:

  • coursework
  • examinations
  • presentations
  • laboratory work

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

Entry requirements​

Science with Foundation Year entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 32-48 points to include 1 A level, or equivalent, in a Mathematics, Science or Technology subject. Other qualifications such as Vocational A levels (AVCE), BTECs and Access courses will also be considered.
  • Certain pathways will require an interview before you can progress. Students who wish to progress to health related studies should be aware that progression will be subject to Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and Occupational Health clearance.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

Qualifications or experience
  • 32-48 points to include 1 A level, or equivalent, in a Mathematics, Science or Technology subject. Other qualifications such as Vocational A levels (AVCE), BTECs and Access courses will also be considered.
  • Certain pathways will require an interview before you can progress. Students who wish to progress to health related studies should be aware that progression will be subject to Enhanced Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) clearance and Occupational Health clearance.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

All our courses go through a rigorous approval process to make sure they’re of the highest quality. This includes a review by a panel of experts, made up of academic staff and an external academic or professional with specialist knowledge.

This course is in the final stages of this process and is open for applications. If any details of the course or its approval status change after you apply, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and will be here to discuss your options with you.

​Course costs

Tuitions fees (2019 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 a year (may be subject to annual increase)

This course isn't currently open to International students.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

Apply

How to apply

To start in 2019 you need to apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – Y100
  • our institution code – P80

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

Not quite ready to apply?

Come to an Open Day to explore our course facilities, tour the campus and have a look around our halls of residence.

If you’re new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

To start in 2020 you need to apply through UCAS. You can start your application now and submit it from 4 September 2019.

In the meantime, sign up to an Open Day to explore our course facilities, tour the campus and have a look around our halls of residence.

If you’re new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

When you apply, you'll need:

  • the UCAS course code –Y100
  • our institution code – P80

How to apply from the outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK but within the European Union, you can apply for this course through UCAS (see the 'How to apply' section above for details) or through an agent. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

This course isn't currently open to international students outside the EU. 

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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