Two students working on an electronic engineering project
UCAS Code
H613 (MEng), H610 (BEng)
Mode of Study
Full-time
Duration
3 years (BEng), 4 years (MEng)
Start Date
September 2021, September 2022
Accredited
Yes

See how you'll be taught in 2021/22 in our Covid information for applicants.

Overview

Advances in electronic technology have a significant impact on the world, from games consoles, digital cameras and smartphones to drones and self-driving cars.

If you're interested in a career designing, developing and manufacturing electronic equipment and devices, this Electronic Engineering degree is the first step to achieving your ambition. You can study it as a Bachelor's degree over 3 years (BEng) or integrated Master's degree over 4 years (MEng).

You’ll examine the theory and design of electronic systems, devices and circuits and learn how electronic engineering contributes to the wider field of electrical engineering.

You’ll work with analogue and digital components such as microprocessors, microcontrollers and programmable devices, using sophisticated facilities and technology. In years 2 and 3, you can study specialist topics that match your interests and ambitions, such as artificial intelligence (AI) and telecommunications.

You’ll apply your skills on projects that solve the types of challenges you’ll face in your career. This includes the option to be part of one of the University’s Formula Student racing teams, where you can specialise in design, production, costing or manufacture of a racing car.

You can also get valuable professional experience by spending a sandwich year working in industry.

The course opens doors to a career as a professional electronics engineer and puts you on the path towards Chartered Engineer status.

MEng or BEng?

The 3-year Bachelor's degree (BEng) and 4-year integrated Master's degree (MEng) share the same modules in years 1–3. The MEng allows you to achieve a Master’s level degree with an extra year of undergraduate study, which can further enhance your career prospects.

If you study the BEng, you can transfer to the MEng if you progress well and achieve good grades. You can also transfer from the MEng to the BEng if you change your mind once you start the course.

Accredited by:

This course is accredited by the Accreditation of European Engineering Programmes (EUR-ACE) and Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET). The MEng meets in full the academic requirement for registration as CEng (Chartered Engineer), while the BEng partially meets these requirements.
TEF Gold Teaching Excellence Framework

100% Graduates in work or further study (MEng) (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey conducted in 2019)

100% Graduated in work or further study (BEng) (HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey conducted in 2019)

Entry requirements​

2021 start

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 104–120 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent, to include Mathematics, plus a relevant subject (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – AAB–BBB
  • UCAS points – 120–136 points to include a minimum of 3 A levels, or equivalent, to include Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDD–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25–27

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – BBB–BCC
  • UCAS points – 104–120 points to include an A level in Mathematics, plus a relevant subject, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Typical offers
  • A levels – AAB–BBB
  • UCAS points – 120–136 points to include a minimum of 3 A levels, or equivalent, to include Mathematics, plus two relevant subjects (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDD–DDM

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

What you'll experience

On this degree course you'll:

  • Get theoretical and practical knowledge in the design of electronic systems
  • Use the latest equipment for analysing and measuring electronics, including logic analysers, spectrum analysers, digital scopes and multi-function generators
  • Learn in facilities including a microcontroller and digital lab, analogue electronics lab, telecommunications lab and computing suites with software applications such as Matlab
  • Use experimental kits, such as ServoSET servo-mechanism (which helps you learn how to stabilise systems) and superheterodyne radio receivers (which help you understand the principles of radio receiver operation)
  • Tailor your studies, choosing module options that match your interests and career ambitions
  • Complete a high-level dissertation under the supervision of a member of staff
  • Develop skills you can use in all areas of your life and career, including team working, research, critical thinking and time management skills

You can also:

  • Get student membership of the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) – this gives you access to practical, technical and career-related resources, and opportunities to volunteer build links with prospective employers
  • Work on a multidisciplinary group project (MEng only) to get the practical experience sought by employers
  • Get valuable professional experience by spending a year working in industry between years 2 and 3
  • Learn a language while you earn credit towards your degree as part of the University's IWLP programme

"I was amazed at the amount of practical work on the course when I came for an open day. After I saw the lab equipment and facilities on offer, I knew I wanted to come to Portsmouth."

Read about Savannah's experience

Careers and opportunities

Electronic engineering has a significant impact on our lives, from telecommunication systems bringing people together to medical technology looking after our health.

Due to the ongoing demand for innovation in medical technology devices, and consumer electronics such as mobile phones and televisions, there's high demand for skilled electronic engineers.

What jobs can you do with an Electronic Engineering degree?

Our graduates now work in roles including:

  • Communications and Information Systems Engineer
  • Design Engineer - Electronics
  • Digital Design Engineer
  • Electronic Design Engineer
  • Electronic Engineer
  • Engineering Officer
  • Graduate Signalling and Telecoms Engineer
  • Hardware Design Engineer
  • Production Support Engineer
  • Service Application Consultant
  • Software Engineer

They've gone on to work for companies that include:

Other graduates have continued their studies at postgraduate level or set up successful businesses with help and support from the University.

Our Careers and Employability service can help you find a job that puts your skills to work in the industry. You can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years after you leave the University as you advance in your career.

IEng and CEng status

When you finish the MEng course successfully, you'll meet the educational requirements for Chartered Engineer status (CEng) status.

When you finish the BEng course successfully, you'll meet the educational requirements for Incorporated Engineer (IEng) status. Once you've met the work experience requirements for IEng status, you can progress to Chartered Engineer status (CEng) with further study and experience.

IEng and CEng status demonstrate your expertise and can include benefits such as improved career prospects and earning potential.

Accrediting bodies such as the IET give my degree an edge compared to other universities. This means I have a career boost before I graduate as my degree is accredited by a well-known engineering institution.

Isaac Emere Johnson, MEng Electronic Engineering

Work experience and career planning

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry.

In your placement year, you can also set up a business on your own or in a group.

We'll help you secure a work placement that fits your aspirations. You’ll get mentoring and support throughout the year.

In previous years, our MEng/BEng (Hons) Electronic Engineering students have secured roles with placement providers that include:

  • Aerospace Engineer, LiveLink
  • Industrial Placement Hardware Engineer, Leonardo
  • Undergraduate Electrical Engineer (Research and Development), Johnston Sweepers
  • Placement Student, MBDA

​What you'll study

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and analyse a range of fundamental concepts in the field of applied physics
  • Perform calculations to analyse simple physical systems using these concepts
  • Apply this knowledge to a range of engineering scenarios and problems
  • Apply these concepts to practical applications
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 134 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll get introduced to concepts of programming techniques that are crucial for software development in electronic engineering and applications. You'll learn C and MATLAB to create a variety of applications.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply fundamental knowledge of the software development life cycle and tools to build C software programs and MATLAB programs.
  • Identify and describe system requirements, software designs and quality metrics
  • Develop software programs that consider usability and hardware portability
  • Apply boolean algebra, iterative algorithms and recursive algorithms for software programs
  • Find and use information provided with software development tools and libraries
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 1-hour lectures
  • 21 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework project (30% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word coursework project (40% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour written exam (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll learn about the practical aspects of printed circuit board design, manufacture, assembly and testing. You’ll take part in a project based learning approach and a practical learning environment and experience.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse direct current (DC) and alternating current (AC) circuits using standard techniques
  • Analyse, construct and test a discrete component audio amplifier
  • Design, construct and test an op-amp based analogue system
  • Lay out, construct, test and prove an electronic circuit
  • Determine appropriate components to meet a range of requirements
  • Communicate work to technical and non-technical audiences
Teaching activities
  • 46 x 1-hour lectures
  • 21 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 112 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 3,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll focus on basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, and differential and partially differential equations

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate your knowledge and understanding of basic functions, polynomial equations, trigonometric equations, vector and matrices, differential and integral calculus, differential and partially differential equations
  • Demonstrate organisational and time-management skills
  • Apply routine mathematical methods
  • Critically analyse and solve mathematical problems applicable to engineering
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
  • 23 x 1-hour practical and workshops
  • 23 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 108 hours studying independently. This is around 6.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 16-week coursework portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You’ll study programmable devices through the microcontroller, looking at their architecture and operation, exploring the concept of high-level and low-level programming languages and their benefits and issues. Theory and concepts are reinforced through lab and project work that allows you to apply these concepts in a variety of situations and also introduces you to considerations that must be evaluated when circuits are implemented.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse, design and implement solutions to specified requirements using digital circuits
  • Analyse, design and implement solutions to basic digital systems to specified requirements using microcontrollers
Teaching activities
  • 21 x 2-hour lectures
  • 15 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 128 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio project (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse signals and systems in the time and frequency domains
  • Design and analyse amplifiers, oscillators and regulated linear power supplies
  • Develop solutions to practical problems in analogue electronics
  • Demonstrate detailed practical knowledge of oscillators
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour lectures
  • 20 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 116 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 1,000-word coursework project (20% of final mark, each)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll develop an understanding of key mathematical methods used in engineering and look at various transform methods and how they're applied in engineering. You’ll also study matrix algebra and methods applicable to engineering problems.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Use laplace transform tables and properties and apply them to the calculation of laplace and inverse laplace transforms
  • Apply laplace transform theorems and methods to the solution of differential equations
  • Express mathematical functions as Fourier series
  • Solve eigenvalue and eigenvector problems
  • Use z-transform tables and properties and apply them to the computation and inversion of z-transforms
  • Apply general methods, including z-transform methods, to the solution of difference equations
  • Solve simple problems in statistics
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 3-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 119 hours studying independently. This is around 7 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through 2 x 90-minute written exams (50% of final mark, each).

What you'll do

You’ll work in group sizes of up to 10 on a technical project specified for you, elect a group leader to manage the project, and assign and agree the different tasks in the team. Your team must meet periodically, report progress to the supervisor through project meetings, submit your report and give a presentation on the work completed.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify and evaluate the core drivers for the design of a product including functionality, usability, environmental legislation, intellectual property and mass production
  • Use and create feasibility reports and design reports for new products
  • Identify the diverse engineering disciplines required for developing commercial products
  • Identify and evaluate common ethical, commercial and management issues in technology related professions
  • Identify and evaluate multiple, and possibly conflicting, requirements such employment contracts, national legislation, professional codes of conduct and personal ethics
  • Use and articulate a decision making process
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 2.5 hours of tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 175.5 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • an 800-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,200-word portfolio project (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll be introduced to more complex microcontroller techniques and to programmable logic, considering the merits of software programmable and hardware programmable implementations of design solutions to complex systems. Theory presented in lectures will be supported by project work providing you with the opportunity to implement the concepts and theory learnt. The project will run throughout the duration of the module's lab sessions and you'll record your ongoing progress in a log book, supporting your demonstration of a working solution and discussion with staff.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and develop solutions to specified requirements using microcontrollers
  • Analyse and develop solutions to practical problems using sequential circuits
Teaching activities
  • 33 x 1-hour lectures
  • 10 x 3-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 137 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical based project (40% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You’ll be introduced to the mathematical modelling of physical systems, and assess system performance using mathematical models and experimental data. You’ll explore practical aspects of applying feedback control and demonstrate the importance of feedback and analyse the stability and performance of feedback control systems using root locus technique and frequency response methods.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

Construct models of physical systems

  • Analyse dynamic system response using Laplace transform, time and frequency response
  • Use a CAE package to simulate the behaviour of dynamic systems and analyse the system time response
  • System Modelling using MATLAB
  • Assess system performance in time and frequency domain
  • Design simple control systems
Teaching activities
  • 23 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

 On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 750-word reports (30% of final mark, each)
  • a 2-hour written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module:

  • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German or Spanish
  • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • coursework (100% of final mark) 

What you'll do

You’ll further develop your analytical skills and knowledge of the subject.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Compare, analyse and contrast the performance of different types of analogue and digital modulation schemes
  • Analyse and critically evaluate the operation and performance of radio receivers and calculate their thermal noise threshold
  • Design basic line of sight (LOS) communication systems and evaluate their performance
  • Describe the digital transmission of commonly found telecommunication based signals and compare the performance of the transmission of digital signals in the presence of noise
  • Comprehensively analyse and compare the properties of standard communications signals in the time and frequency domains and analyse their information content
  • Demonstrate understanding of the practical aspects of sampling theory, radio receivers and analogue/digital modulation
Teaching activities
  • 14 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 3 x 3-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 2 x 6-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 141 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio project (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You’ll explore exemplar systems for particular application areas such as instrumentation and communications.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and evaluate advanced analogue electronic circuits
  • Design and evaluate analogue sensing and measurement systems
  • Demonstrate understanding of the main regulatory and technical aspects of electromagnetic interference (EMI) and electromagnetic compatibility (EMC)
  • Analyse the behaviour of transmission lines under a variety of loading conditions
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the practical aspects of implementing some exemplar advanced electronic systems
Teaching activities
  • 22 x 2-hour lectures
  • 3 x 3-hour lab sessions
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 147 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio project (30% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (70% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll explore two main categories of signal processing: signal analysis and signal processing. Signal analysis will focus on frequency content estimation using Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT).

You'll also learn how to process and enhance the frequency content of the signal using various types of digital filters.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of and be able to implement and use algorithms for discrete-time signal analysis
  • Demonstrate knowledge of and be able to develop and implement algorithms for discrete-time signal processing
  • Implement, evaluate and discuss the important DSP algorithms for discrete-time signal analysis and processing
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical exercise (30% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (70% of final mark)

What you'll do
Your focus will come from an extensive list provided by academic staff, or suggested by yourself. You'll develop planning and self-management techniques, as well as the skills for activities that require a solution, investigation or analysis.
What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Organise, plan and schedule a task showing competency in conducting research, design and/or development
  • Demonstrate project management skills, including the application of time and resources, as well as working with technical uncertainty
  • Conduct a problem-solving activity requiring measures of analysis, synthesis, creativity and decision-making, reflecting the technical skills gained on your course
  • Reflect on the commercial, economic and social context of the project, including ethics in engineering, health and safety, environmental and commercial risk, sustainability and innovation, risk assessment and management
  • Confidently present and communicate information by written report and visual display, orally illustrating your competence in critical evaluation and thinking
Teaching activities
  • 4 x 1-hour lectures
  • 2 x 1-hour seminars
  • 12 hours of project supervision
Independent study

We recommend you spend at least 382 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10,000-word dissertation (100% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll use techniques based on classical methods to achieve required performance for particular transient and steady-state specification. You’ll also explore the root-locus and frequency response methods of classical control system design.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse and examine system relative stability
  • Determine and critically evaluate appropriate system design requirements from a time domain performance specification
  • Propose and assess an appropriate control structure for required performance criteria and design compensators to meet design specifications
  • Transfer function identification using a CAE package from practical input-output data and analysis of systems parameter variations
  • Design and implement controllers using MATLAB
Teaching activities
  • 18 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • 2 x 750-word reports (20% of final mark, each)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Issues of increasing complexity must be managed for any development to be successful in a rapidly changing marketplace. In this module, you’ll explore the use of a hardware description language (VHDL) that enables the high level design, implementation and test of complex systems, targeted at field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs).

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Design and synthesise complex digital systems using VHDL and computer based tools
  • Verify correct functional behaviour of a design through the use of simulation and hardware tests on a target FPGA device
  • Plan, analyse and evaluate different hierarchic design approaches and methods, to create an integrated system, through the use of VHDL modelling
  • Generate appropriate documentation to record the design process in reaching an effective implementation solution to given requirements
Teaching activities
  • 11 x 2-hour lectures
  • 10 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
  • a 2-hour demonstration
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 156 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module."

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word portfolio project (50% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You’ll explore established approaches and those currently under research and examine the fundamental theory behind artificial neural networks, fuzzy logic, evolutionary algorithms and hybrid methods. You’ll also study practical applications of computational intelligence systems, various approaches to AI and the current state of AI research.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a familiarisation with the principles and theories central to the AI field
  • Apply a range of AI tools and techniques to address a wider class of problems
  • Evaluate a range of methods for developing intelligent systems
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 1-hour lectures
  • 6 x 1-hour seminars
  • 2 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 180 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (20% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

Embedded systems are computing systems whose purpose is to control a device, a process, or a larger system. The importance of embedded systems is growing continuously as more application scenarios around us use embedded and real-time systems to operate intelligently, reliably, securely and efficiently.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Appraise the structures and applications of real-time operating systems and embedded computer systems
  • Design, develop and analyse examples of real-time embedded computer system solutions
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 11 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 154 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

 On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework project (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute exam (50% of final mark)

 

Year 4 (MEng only)

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll get a practical experience of utilising signal processing by analysing and modifying signals such as your own speech or other audio recordings, through coursework assignments using MATLAB package.

Coursework will consist of a set of interesting and engaging computer-based exercises, which will follow algorithms discussed and explained in the lecture.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the knowledge and apply a range of techniques to examine the characteristics of two types of discrete signals – deterministic and random signals, both in time and frequency domains.
  • Analyse the performance of advanced digital filtering algorithms including various versions of optimal and adaptive digital filters to process deterministic and random digital signals.
  • Implement, test and evaluate advanced DSP methods in order to solve practical engineering problems.
Teaching activities
  • 9 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 16-hour coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also learn quantification, quantified risk analysis, methods of elimination/mitigation, and learn about economic appraisals of integrated renewable energy and petroleum projects.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the theory of economics based on discounted cash flow
  • Use the knowledge and processes you've learned to calculate the key economic metrics used in investment decision making 
  • Demonstrate an in-depth understanding of the engineering inputs to the cash flow model
  • Critically evaluate the underlying concepts in risk analysis and uncertainty management
  • Critically evaluate HSE (Health and Safety Executive) requirements for the industry
Teaching activities
  • 12 x 2-hour lectures
  • 12 x 1-hour seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,500-word coursework portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 90 minute written exam (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

Working as part of a team, you'll complete a project-based Learning activity relating to a significant circuit simulation, as well as a design problem relating to a range of devices used in high frequency RF systems. You'll also attend lectures where you'll learn to understand the characteristics of high-speed circuit design.

You'll simulate circuits and/or devices at high frequencies, and analyse and tweak the results presented by simulation software. You'll then put this knowledge to use in the design and build of different blocks that make up a complex project.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Model and analyse high-speed interconnect phenomena.
  • Critically evaluate the behavioural and performance characteristics of electronic systems, taking account of high-speed effects.
  • Compare and contrast the key differences between simulated and realisable characteristics of at least one modern RF/microwave device or circuit through simulation, as well as the building or measurement of a given device.
  • Critically analyse and design a RF/Microwave block that is part of a bigger system, carefully considering its impact on the larger system and vice versa.
Teaching activities
  • 25 x 1-hour lectures
  • 15 x 1-hour practice classes and workshops
  • 5 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 155 hours studying independently. This is around 9 hours a week over the duration of the module.

What you'll do

You'll hone skills you'll need in your career, such as teamwork, critical thinking, progress reporting, communication skills, meeting times, division of responsibility, presentation and risk management.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work effectively as an individual within a project team
  • Demonstrate team working and communication skills through group work
  • Use appropriate technology to design and implement a system that meets technical and business objectives
  • Assess knowledge from a range of sources and apply it effectively to a problem
  • Apply management techniques to achieve project objectives
  • Present project results
Teaching activities
  • 2 x 1-hour lectures
    2 x 1-hour seminars
    6 x 1-hour project supervision
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 190 hours studying independently. This is around 12 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 30-minute oral assessment and presentation (20% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word (per student) coursework report (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll also apply classroom knowledge in a practical setting and gain an appreciation of current measurement requirements.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse the performance of a measurement system against set criteria
  • Propose solutions which yield reliable measurement systems
  • Assess the hardware and software measurement needs for a given application
  • Design and implement a measurement system (hardware and/or software) to help solve a given problem
Teaching activities
  • 6 x 1-hour tutorials
  • 12 x 2-hour practical classes and workshops
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,000-word coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
  • a 90-minute written exam (50% of final mark)

Changes to course content

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • Lectures
  • Seminars
  • Tutorials
  • Laboratory and project work
  • CAE system activity
  • Open access study

There's an emphasis on honing your practical skills and putting what you learn into practice.

Teaching staff profiles

These are some of the expert staff who’ll teach you on this electronic engineering degree course.

Dr Abdulkarim Tawfik, Course Leader

Abdul is the Course Leader for a number of electronic engineering courses and also involved in the teaching of a number of topics in the area of Electronic Telecommunications. He completed his PhD in the area of Terrestrial Transhorizon Telecommunications Over the Sea at Portsmouth.

Dr John Geddes, Principal Lecturer

John is the course leader for the Electronic Systems Engineering top-up degree, by distance learning. He is the University Academic Contact for UK Ministry of Defence collaborative programmes, and for a transnational programme in the Far East. On campus, John teaches Control Engineering.

Rallis Papademetriou, Principal Lecturer

Rallis a Senior Member of The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), a member of IET and a Chartered Engineer. He is a Principal Lecturer in the School of Energy and Electronic Engineering lecturing at BEng, MEng and MSc level. The joint recipient of 2 best research paper awards, he has published extensively on signal processing and communications in professional journals, conference proceedings and edited books.

Dr Branislav Vuksanovic, Senior Lecturer

Branislav worked as a Project Engineer for the Croatian Electricity Board in Osijek, Croatia, and has published papers in the field of active noise control, biomedical signal processing and pattern recognition for intrusion detection and knowledge-based authentication. He teaches Digital Signal Processing, Advanced DSP Techniques, Power Systems and Electrical Machines modules.

Dr Nils Bausch, Lecturer

Nils gained his PhD in Engineering (Smart Homes) at the University of Portsmouth and now works as the Departmental Research Degrees Coordinator in the School of Energy and electronic engineering. He teaches VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language) and programming modules. He is a Chartered Engineer and a member of both the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

How you're assessed​

You’ll be assessed through:

  • Written examinations
  • Coursework
  • Practical tests
  • Project work
  • Presentations

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You will get feedback on all formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you're assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 55% by exams and 45% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 62% by exams, 38% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 33% by exams and 67% by coursework
  • Year 4 students (MEng only): 48% by exams and 52% by coursework

How you'll spend your time

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, practical classes and workshops for about 16 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2–4, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. Optional field trips may involve evening and weekend teaching or events. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term dates

The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

See term dates

Extra learning support

You'll get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to postgraduate study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

As well as regular scheduled meetings with your personal tutor, they're also available at set times during the week if you want to chat with them about anything that can't wait until your next meeting.

Learning support tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty learning support tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study in one-on-one and group sessions.

They can help you:

  • master the mathematics skills you need to excel on your course
  • understand engineering principles and how to apply them in any engineering discipline
  • solve computing problems relevant to your course
  • develop your knowledge of computer programming concepts and methods relevant to your course
  • understand and use assignment feedback

Laboratory support

All our labs and practical spaces are staffed by qualified laboratory support staff. They’ll support you in scheduled lab sessions and can give you one-to-one help when you do practical research projects.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • Academic writing
  • Note taking
  • Time management
  • Critical thinking
  • Presentation skills
  • Referencing
  • Working in groups
  • Revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

I am dyslexic so coming back to university has been extremely formidable for me as I have failed a lot of exams. The ASDAC team has been absolutely brilliant and changed the way I learn. Huge essays and reports that I had to write were manageable through different techniques and strategies given to me by the ASDAC team.

Kathryn Hunter, BEng (Hons) Electronic Engineering

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Maths and stats support

The Maths Café offers advice and assistance with mathematical skills in a friendly, informal environment. You can come to our daily drop-in sessions, develop your maths skills at a workshop or use our online resources.

Support with English

If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

​Course costs and funding

Tuition fees (2021 start)

  • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • EU students – £9,250 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £17,600 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You’ll need to pay additional costs of £50–£1000 to cover travel, accommodation or subsistence if you take a placement abroad. The amount you’ll pay will vary, depending on the location and length of your stay.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2021, apply through Clearing by completing this short application form, calling our Clearing hotline on +44 (0)23 9284 8074 or going to our Clearing section to chat with us online.

You can also find out how Clearing works, sign up for Clearing updates and book a call back on results day.

International and EU students

Clearing is open to all applicants. But if you'd prefer to apply without going through Clearing, use our online application form:

To start this course in 2022, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

  • the UCAS course code – H610 (BEng) or H613 (MEng)
  • our institution code – P80

If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form:

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

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