CCI Studio Hub
UCAS Code
P30C
Mode of Study
Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement
Duration
3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement
Start Date
September 2019, September 2020
Accredited
Yes

Overview

Television is evolving and the need for media content continues to grow along with the popularity of platforms such as YouTube, Netflix and Now TV.

This BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree course is an exciting and practical way to learn how to produce and make live television programmes whilst developing industry-level skills in media production. You’ll become a multi-skilled, media-savvy broadcaster who's fully experienced in camera-operating, sound recording, producing, presenting, directing, editing and writing for media platforms and television.

You’ll use industry-standard video kit and multiple TV studios to produce and broadcast live television content to audiences, which will prepare you for employment within this fast-paced and competitive industry.

What you can do on this BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree
Live feed of CCI TV programme Fast Fresh Food

Watch BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree students work in different team roles to produce a live broadcast from Eldon Building for CCI TV Channel.

[00:00:12] [Indistinct chatter]

[00:00:16] Enwezor: You know, as they transfer things over—

[00:00:17] Dan: Yeah

[00:00:18] Enwezor: They can put them in these bowls and—

[00:00:20] Dan: OK, because it's—yeah, as long as they chop here so the camera can see them.

[00:00:23] Hannah: Three, 26... 58—yep! That's fine.

[00:00:29] Sam: And just keep my hands here to be seen.

[00:00:31] Louis: That's fine. Yeah.

[00:00:35] Dan: If presenters stand in a position, please.

[00:00:39] Aaron: So it's round about five minutes until we are live.

[00:00:42] Hannah: OK, guys, we've got five minutes until start.

[00:00:45] Jake: Er, good luck guys—

[00:00:46] Meg: Thank you.

[00:00:46] Jake: Yeah, just going to smash it. I'm going to be upstairs—

[00:00:48] Meg: Cheers!

[00:00:48] Jake: —But yeah, all the confidence in the world.

[00:00:51] Meg: Thank you.

[00:00:51] Jake: It's going to be delicious; I can't wait to try it.

[00:00:52] Lee: Right, is everyone ready?

[00:00:53] Meg: Ooh, good luck!

[00:00:54] Lee: You guys ready?

[00:00:55] Emily: Remember: talk slowly.

[00:00:56] Hannah: Yep.

[00:00:57] Ethan: This is the one I'm most nervous of – don't know why.

[00:00:58] Meg: You'll be fine, honestly.

[00:00:59] Ethan: I think it's because everything could go wrong.

[00:01:02] Aaron: Twenty.

[00:01:03] Emily: Deep breath, 20 seconds.

[00:01:03] Aaron: 20 seconds.

[00:01:07] Emily: It's exciting, guys.

[00:01:09] Aaron: Ten, nine, eight...

[00:01:12] Hannah: Seven, six...

[00:01:14] ALL: Five, four...

[00:01:16] Emily/Hannah: Three, two, one...

[00:01:19] Hannah: Zero.

[00:01:20] Ethan: Cheap, quick and easy-to-cook food. The students'...

[00:01:22] Emma: Cue the opening titles.

[00:01:24] Ethan: ...Whether you're veggie or not, we have a dish that'll leave your mouth watering.

[00:01:28] Meg: This is Fast, Fresh Food.

[00:01:29] Emma: Cut.

[00:01:30] Aaron: Fifteen.

[00:01:31] Emma: Preview Eight.

[00:01:33] Dan: Go now, Lee – go, go, go.

[00:01:38] Hannah: Ten, nine—

[00:01:39] Dan: Eight.

[00:01:40] Hannah: —Eight, seven, six...

[00:01:42] Dan: Camera Three, good – that shot is perfect, Jo; perfect there.

[00:01:43] Hannah: ... Five, four, three, two, one, zero.

[00:01:48] Meg: Hello, and you're watching...

[00:01:49] Emma: Right – get ready with name straps.

[00:01:51] Meg: Today, we bring you the second of three live cooking shows produced by Television and Broadcasting students.

Accredited by

This course is accredited by the industry body ScreenSkills (formerly Creative Skillset). This accreditation lets potential employers know that this course gives you the relevant skills and abilities you need to work in the broadcasting industry when you graduate.

In January 2018, this course won the NewTek Best U.K Content Award, with our course team also being awarded as NewTek Tutors of the Year.

91% Overall student satisfaction (NSS, 2019)

What you'll experience

On this Television and Broadcasting degree course, you'll:

  • Learn the specialist skills you need to thrive in the industry – 75% of this course is practical
  • Use professional cameras (Sony, JVC, Canon), audio equipment (Sennheiser, Sony, Mackie) vision mixing systems (including the Ross Carbonite and the NewTek TriCaster system) and scheduling software for our television channel (Capital Networks' Audience.TV)
  • Develop your television production and editing skills
  • Experience running a real TV channel and make TV and radio programmes
  • Get valuable vocational qualifications and industry-recognised certification using software such as Avid and Adobe
  • Diversify your broadcasting knowledge by taking specialist modules that support your career ambitions
  • Contribute to our student-led TV channel, CCI TV
  • Get involved with our live weekly TV programme, which we broadcast to thousands of people on campus, around the city and online

Careers and opportunities

This degree course can take you in many directions in the broadcasting industry.

What jobs can you do with a television and broadcasting degree?

Our television and broadcasting graduates have gone on to enjoy successful careers in broadcasting and television transmission, post-production, radio, and TV studio production.

Many have secured jobs at household names such as Sky, BBC, IMG, Channel 4, Lion TV and Envy in roles such as:

  • camera operator
  • studio technician
  • video editor
  • studio manager
  • presentation scheduler
  • videographer
  • film/video producer

After you leave the University, you can get help, advice and support for up to 5 years from our Careers and Employability service as you advance in your career.

The course taught me so many skills which have been invaluable at work in the industry for broadcasters like ITV and BBC.

Alex Watson, BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting

What you'll study on this BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree

Each module on this course is worth a certain number of credits.

In each year, you need to study modules worth a total of 120 credits. For example, 4 modules worth 20 credits and 1 module worth 40 credits.

Year 1

Core modules

What you'll do

Your introduction will develop your knowledge of production processes, technologies, terminologies, operating skills, roles and practices related to television production. You'll also learn to consider diversity and representation in the creation of television show media.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Create media using digital filming technology (including professional camcorders, location sound recording and television studio equipment)
  • Recognise and use professional audio-visual communication grammar and terminology
  • Analyse video and television from a stylistic, structural, contextual and historical perspective
  • Compare, evaluate and identify key roles, skills, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective multi-camera studio production
  • Compare, evaluate and identify key roles, skills, responsibilities and procedures involved in creating graphics within team production/crewing groups
  • Identify and implement health and safety, welfare and compliance issues in television production
  • Produce a television programme to a set format
  • Recognise the role of audience, compliance, diversity, and broadcast legalities in television production
Teaching activities
  • 20 x 1-hour lectures
  • 18 x 1-hour practical classes and workshops
  • 6 x 1-hour seminars
  • 15 x 2-hour supervised time in studio/workshop
  • 7 x 1-hour tutorials
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 319 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-minute video project (30% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute video project (30% of final mark)
  • an individual essay (10% of final mark)
  • a 2000-word essay (30% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Differentiate between the use and application of different editing software platforms
  • Demonstrate understanding and application of basic editing skills with Avid MC
  • Interpret and apply key concepts of digital media management storage and techniques
  • Recognise the application of industry practice on any given project
  • Define the use of particular editing techniques in film and television products
  • Interpret the historical and theoretical use of editing techniques
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures and practical classes.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 142 hours studying independently. This is around 8.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour examination (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour practical skills assessment (60% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the ability to outline laws, professional codes of conduct and moral philosophical positions relating to creative media production practices, film and TV production, and broadcast/exhibition
  • Identify and demonstrate your skills, interests and motivations in the context of career decision making
  • Explore the options, both locally and globally, open to you and identify the specific skills and qualities you need to work in the creative industries
  • Identify and research different sources of vacancy information and recruitment methods used by employers and course providers
  • Evaluate how your skills, personal priorities and other constraints could affect career decisions
  • Recognise, identify and develop a professional online presence by using and applying appropriate technology to create an effective online portfolio, blog and CV
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and fieldwork.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through coursework (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll learn how to write scripts, research and interview for broadcast, engage an audience with compelling content and use your voice effectively to present different styles of radio programming. You'll also learn how to produce and broadcast a radio show through industry-led technical workshops.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Differentiate between oral and written techniques and styles
  • Apply creative thought and structure to subjects and information
  • Recognise the principles of good writing for broadcast
  • Understand how to write and present for a variety of audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and seminars. 

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 162 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute coursework exercise (40% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute coursework exercise (60% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of conducting and using extensive research on a variety of media examples and contexts at undergraduate level.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand academic standards and concepts
  • Identify, extract and employ relevant information from appropriate sources
  • Apply generic and specific research/study techniques to the production of assessed work
  • Develop an independent research project to a final group presentation and portfolio essay
  • Use Harvard (APA) academic style in written assessments
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word essay (40% of final mark)

Year 2

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll follow the typical timeline of industry programme pre-production and learn the key skills of content generation, research and storytelling, to get your ideas off the ground. You'll also explore the key elements of producing a factual programme, how the commissioning process works, how to cast the right people, how to get your idea noticed and how to tell compelling stories.

What you'll learn

You’ll learn the key skills of content generation, research and storytelling.

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work as part of an editorial team
  • Develop, pitch and produce factual programming to an industry standard
  • Produce factual media that is technically proficient for broadcast using video recording tools
  • Learn to pitch confidently, and to present and defend an original idea
  • Understand how the commissioning process works, from concept to transmission
  • Understand the factual narrative and develop a topic into TV
  • Critically evaluate a range of factual media programming for audience consumption
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute oral team assessment and accompanying paperwork (30% of final mark)
  • a 7-minute set team exercise and accompanying paperwork (70% of final mark)

On this module you'll examine the production, reception and marketing of genre and its main categorisations.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Discuss the role of genre as a categorisation
  • Explain the critical and economic considerations of media texts
  • Evaluate texts in institutional, historical and cultural contexts
  • Recognise and analyse the cultural relevance of genre in various media
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend weekly 2-hour lectures featuring clips, analysis exercises and lecture discussions, and 3 x 1-hour online seminars to to assist with assessment preparation. You'll also have access to one-on-one group tutorials to prepare for assessments.

You'll be supplied with online resources such as recordings, suggested materials, film and media texts, the reading list and other materials. You'll be able to contact module lecturers in their office hours and via email.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word academic poster or blog post on a horror media text of your choice (50% of final mark)

Before your assessments, guidance and informal assessment through drafting and feedback will be offered on an individual basis.

What you'll do

On this module, you'll create a 20-minute television pilot aimed at a specific time time and channel output. You'll focus on what makes a successful format and appropriate content. You'll also develop a brand, working format and style that can be replicated as part of a series.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically identify and respond to specific audiences based on output
  • Apply professional health and safety practices
  • Reflect and respond to developing trends in broadcasting
  • Design and develop a television brand that can be replicated, following professional standards
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a project (40% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll use the critique and outcomes from the Television Pilot module to work on an established television format and develop a live episode two. You'll use an already established style but further improve it, developing your knowledge in the replication of production techniques and assets.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically appraise and implement feedback and advice to improve a television production series
  • Identify and implement established styles and production role
  • Understand and identify the limitations and benefits of live television
  • Implement a consistent level of content relevant to a defined audience
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and workshops, tutorials, lectures and seminars.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
  • a project (40% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You'll develop advanced editing techniques, post-production workflows and essential knowledge of compression, encoding and manipulation of digital video to enhance employability.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate a conceptual and practical understanding of offline and online workflow
  • Understand the fundamental concepts behind human vision and colour
  • Evaluate aesthetic and technical decisions relating to post-production workflow
  • Understand the process of compression and manipulation of video and digital images
  • Implement a comprehensive approach to the storage of file formats
  • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts through the use of relevant software
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour written exam (40% of final mark)
  • a 2-hour practical skills assessment (60% of final mark)

Optional modules

What you'll do

You'll enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
  • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
  • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
  • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
  • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
  • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
Teaching activities

N/A

Independent study time

N/A

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

What you’ll do

Part of your module is delivered in partnership with Sky, combining work-based learning with campus-based teaching, learning and training.

What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand the broadcast transmission chain
  • Understand IP protocols and networking within transmission
  • Evaluate technical decisions relating to broadcasting (such as QC/monitoring, encoding and signals)
  • Understand the file formats, storage requirements and compression used within video and digital images
  • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts to the use of different topologies (such as cabling and differing connections)
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and work-based learning sessions.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 177 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)
  • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
  • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
  • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
Teaching activities

On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
  • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Apply the practical skills and production techniques, appropriate to client requirements
  • Implement creativity in the client’s marketplace
  • Deliver a finished client product to agreed timescales
  • Demonstrate effective project management in the form of a finished client product to agreed timescales
  • Demonstrate professional project management in the form of research, organisation and reflective analysis of the process
  • Explain appropriate professional relationships and attitudes towards colleagues and clients
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend seminars, lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 161 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 10-minute portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a written essay assignment (30% of final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify future career goals and reflect on these to develop a personal development plan (programme of learning), which includes suitable work experience and skills/knowledge development opportunities
  • Arrange suitable work experience, engage with personal development opportunities and analyse relevant literature relating to enhancing your employment opportunities
  • Critically evaluate and articulate your learning (knowledge, skills and attributes) in relation to your future career goals
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 188 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
  • a 3,000-word report (80% of final mark)

You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Critically reflect on your effectiveness at tasks that use employability skills such as project planning, communication, time management, leadership and teamwork
  • Evaluate the theory and complete the practice of establishing and running a business enterprise
  • Understand the systems commonly used to plan, record and monitor business decisions and company transactions
  • Critically reflect on the factors that contribute towards the success or failure of business start ups
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

  • a 2,000 word report (50% of your final mark)
  • an oral assessment and presentation (50% of your final mark)

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate the operation and use of scuba diving equipment
  • Display proficiency in basic diving safety and rescue procedures
  • Understand and apply the physical and physiological principles of diving
  • Plan, organise and conduct safe diving activities appropriate to the circumstances
  • Plan and undertake dives for producing underwater film or photography
  • Use and explain the techniques used in underwater film production and photography
  • Describe and explain the main features of HSE legislation, risk assessment, project reports and the conduct of a diving project, within the Media Approved Codes of Practice
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical skills assessment (pass/fail) - PADI Diving Certification
  • project output (100% of final mark) - either a 3-minute micro film or a production file

Year 3

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll produce live television for assessment, regular screening events, and online broadcast.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Produce broadcast media on a given subject to industry standards
  • Work to strict broadcast deadlines
  • Demonstrate skills and methods for producing and scheduling a regular broadcast production
  • Critically reflect upon your personal development
  • Evaluate your contribution to working as part of a team
  • Critique, review and selectively consider broadcast content for audience needs based on theme
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 263 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a set practical exercise (70% of final mark)
  • a 2,500-word employability-focused portfolio (30% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll learn how to produce demanding factual narrative film and video work, leading to the completion of projects you can use for showreel/portfolio purposes. You'll get extra guidance regarding ethical filmmaking, risk assessment and technique.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Analyse concepts of realism and address problems of recording and representing reality in moving image media
  • Assemble, organise and structure complex documentary narratives that challenge your audience's perception of the subject matter
  • Produce a comprehensive video artefact that demonstrates a contextual understanding of the medium
  • Critically examine – with reference to key documentary theory and film makers – the influence of historical, economical and technological developments in the medium of documentary film making
Teaching activities

On this module, you'll attend lectures, seminars and workshops.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2,500-word essay (40% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute video documentary (60% of final mark)

What you’ll do

You can create either:

  1. a 4,000–5,000-word essay/report using primary and secondary research to examine or argue a particular issue, or
  2. a TV documentary or programme, supported by a standard 2,000–3,000-word essay or 'video essay'
What you’ll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Combine knowledge and apply it across areas related to television broadcasting practice
  • Demonstrate critical, creative and/or analytical knowledge of your subject area
  • Demonstrate written and/or verbal communication skills in module-appropriate contexts
  • Critically analyse individual or collective enterprise, creativity and risk in development broadcast work, research activity or production management
  • Critically reflect on your personal growth and identify personal achievements and specific development needs
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend project supervision meetings and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 185 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through a coursework project (100% of final mark).

What you'll do

You'll develop an awareness of how the erosion of traditional broadcast platforms is impacting how we tell stories, how programmes are commissioned, and how the expectations and needs of the audiences are changing. In your lectures, you'll reflect, investigate and critique topics such as employability and emerging technology so that you'll graduate with an understanding of what the future might look like for broadcasting and the media.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Instil a critical and reflective understanding of current and future developments of media broadcast platforms
  • Investigate current broadcast trends to predict longevity or potential limitations in future audience interest and viewing figures
  • Compare and contrast the television and media roles necessary to develop required programming, to scope likely employment opportunities
  • Critically engage with current employment opportunities to focus on likely career paths
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, take part in tutorials and attend industry–facing events.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 177 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 500-word set coursework exercise (20% of final mark) – attend and report on an industry facing event
  • a 15-minute oral assessment and presentation (80% of final mark)

What you'll do

You'll oversee and/or design and publish, a personal professional website, which features an industry-level CV, show reel and other examples of work.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate project management skills in the context of the work you do in the module
  • Demonstrate how to manage your workload and organise material effectively
  • Create an online platform showcasing your skills and examples of your work
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of your work, with reflective reviews and evaluation
  • Document your processes for each assignment in a professional and cohesive way
  • Gather and deploy the skills necessary for continuing personal development in different media contexts and effectively communicate this via a package for self promotion
  • Apply and critically reflect on your graduate and employability skills in a professional work environment
Teaching activities

On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend seminars and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 134 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a portfolio (70% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)

We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry and some optional modules may not run every year. If a module doesn’t run, we’ll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

How you're assessed

You'll be assessed through:

  • essay and report writing
  • sound and video artefacts
  • blogging
  • journal writing
  • written exams
  • practical exams emulating real-world practice

You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

The way you’re assessed may depend on the modules you select. As a guide, students on this course last year were typically assessed as follows:

  • Year 1 students: 17% by written exams, 40% by practical exams and 43% by coursework
  • Year 2 students: 4% by written exams, 39% by practical exams and 57% by coursework
  • Year 3 students: 8% by written exams, 35% by practical exams and 57% by coursework

Placement year

After your second year, you can do an optional work placement year to get valuable longer-term work experience in the industry. You’ll have access to Creative Careers; a team within the faculty helping students to find placement opportunities within the creative industries. They’ll provide you with a database of placement vacancies, support with your job search, including help with applications and interviews, and support throughout your placement.

Previous students have done placements with some of the big players in the broadcasting industry, including:

  • Discovery UK
  • Sky
  • Envy
  • IMG
  • Ross Video
  • Gearhouse Broadcast

You can also set up your own business in your placement year, on your own or with others on your course. 

The benefits of a BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree
An interview with BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting student, Thomas Halliday

Hear from Thomas the perks of studying this BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree, including his chance to work on set with BBC for its shows Flog It and The Big Questions.

Work experience and career planning

To give you the best chance of securing a great job when you graduate, our Careers and Employability service can help you find relevant work experience during your course.

We can help you identify placements, internships, voluntary roles and freelancing opportunities that will complement your studies and build your portfolio.

Teaching

Teaching methods on this course include:

  • lectures
  • seminars
  • hands-on workshops

You can access all teaching resources on Moodle, our virtual learning environment, from anywhere with a Web connection.

Teaching staff profiles

Charlie Watts, Principal Lecturer

Before joining the University, Charlie freelanced as an Avid editor, working for Meridian, Channel 4 and Oasis TV, and brings his extensive experience in broadcast television transmission delivery, post-production and teaching to the team.

His research interests include industry and academic interaction, deep learning via web tree usage, and the evolving methods of broadcasting.

Evan Pugh, Lecturer

Evan is an experienced director of documentaries and reality television, with credits such as Big Brother for Channel Four, Celebrity Scissorhands for the BBC, and Love Island and I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here for ITV.

Evan has also previously worked on The Lord of the Rings - Return of the King, filming animation reference for the character of Gollum, and he specialises in filming, organising productions, controlling large crews, and covering live broadcasting events.

Zoe Sale, Lecturer

Zoe is a producer and documentary filmmaker who was part of the Nobel Prize nominated team on the multi-award-winning Sri Lanka’s Killing Fields and War Crimes Unpunished films for Channel 4 and ITN Productions. She was also part of the team that produced No Fire Zone, a feature-length documentary that screened worldwide.

After completing a postgraduate degree in broadcast journalism, Zoe got her start in the industry as a researcher for BBC South West, working in current affairs and politics. She went on to spend a few years as a Producer/Director on the regional magazine programme Inside Out, before moving up to network BBC and working on Rogue Traders.

After going freelance, Zoe worked on Tonight with Trevor McDonald and various factual programming for ITV and National Geographic. And from 2012–2015, Zoe became the main in-house development producer for the current affairs unit at the BBC.

How you'll spend your time

One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

At university, as well as spending time in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars and tutorials, you’ll do lots of independent study with support from our staff when you need it.

A typical week

We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Television and Broadcasting degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, fieldwork and supervised studio sessions for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. You'll probably do more independent study and have less scheduled teaching in years 2 and 3, but this depends on which modules you choose.

Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

Term times

The academic year runs from September to early June with breaks at Christmas and Easter. It's divided into 2 teaching blocks and 2 assessment periods:

  • September to December – teaching block 1
  • January – assessment period 1
  • January to May – teaching block 2 (includes Easter break)
  • May to June – assessment period 2

Extra learning support

The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get face-to-face support from teaching and support staff when you need it. These include the following people and services:

Personal tutor

Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

You’ll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

Student support advisor

In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

Academic skills tutors

You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

They can help with:

  • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
  • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
  • understanding and using assignment feedback
  • managing your time and workload
  • revision and exam techniques

Creative skills tutors

If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.

IT and computing support

Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

Academic skills support

As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

  • academic writing
  • note taking
  • time management
  • critical thinking
  • presentation skills
  • referencing
  • working in groups
  • revision, memory and exam techniques

If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

Library support

Library staff are available in person or by email, phone or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

Entry requirements​

BSc (Hons) Television and Broadcasting degree entry requirements

Qualifications or experience
  • 112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

Qualifications or experience
  • 112 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent.

See the other qualifications we accept

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.0 with no component score below 5.5.

See alternative English language qualifications

What skills and qualities do I need for this television and broadcasting degree course?

You don't necessarily need existing media skills in addition to meeting the course entry requirements before you start this television and broadcasting degree.

However, you should have a passion for television and be open-minded to what the television broadcasting industry could offer you as a career.

​Course costs

Tuition fees (2019 start)

  • UK/EU/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
  • International students – £14,700 per year (subject to annual increase)

Additional course costs

These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

Additional costs

Our accommodation section shows your accommodation options and highlights how much it costs to live in Portsmouth.

You’ll study up to 6 modules a year. You may have to read several recommended books or textbooks for each module.

You can borrow most of these from the Library. If you buy these, they may cost up to £60 each.

We recommend that you budget £75 a year for photocopying, memory sticks, DVDs and CDs, printing charges, binding and specialist printing.

If your final year includes a major project, there could be cost for transport or accommodation related to your research activities. The amount will depend on the project you choose.

You may need to spend £50 to £100 each year on a variety of materials, such as DVDs or camera cards, and a small hard drive to back up media.

We recommended you get the most recent version of Avid accreditation text, which costs around £50–£80.

If you take the Student Enterprise Module, you’ll need to pay an additional cost of approximately £20.

The Underwater Filming and Media module is available if you haven’t dived before. It includes a PADI Open Water course combined with the Underwater Filming and Media course. It costs around £850.

The Underwater Filming and Media B module is available if you already hold a PADI Open Water certificate (or equivalent). It includes a further diving course (e.g. PADI Advanced Open Water), combined with the Underwater Filming and Media Course, and costs around £700 to cover tuition, transport and diving costs.

Common questions about this subject

Can't find the answer to your questions about this course or anything else about undergraduate life? Contact us

Common television and broadcasting questions

Television is a label we use for a 'content platform', which includes smartphones, tablets and computers as well as TVs. Any viewing of media on these platforms is 'televised media'.

Broadcasting is how we deliver televised media to mass audiences. Because the way people consume televised media has changed, we also use the term 'narrowcasting'. This describes how we deliver televised media to smaller, more specific audiences.

The words 'television' and 'broadcasting' indicate something has been made to engage an audience and there's a plan and means to deliver it to that audience. For example, Netflix commissions a series of programmes because there is thought to be an audience for it. The series goes into production and it appears on the Netflix viewing platform.

The next time you watch something that's televised – for example, I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here or Game of Thrones – imagine being one of the people involved in making it happen.

Television and broadcasting is still one of the most effective ways to communicate. Working in television and broadcasting gives you the opportunity to have a hand in something that might be seen by millions of people.

To prepare yourself for this television and broadcasting degree, a good starting point is to watch different types of televised media – for example, BBC and other terrestrial channels, and YouTube and Netflix.

Think about what processes took place before the programme was made (pre-production), imagine yourself behind the camera view (production) and look at the editing, colour, sound effects and graphics (post-production). 

A good broadcaster is aware of the different ways to convey ideas through televised media. They also have a good grasp of legal and technical issues that go hand-in-hand with television.

We're one of the few universities in the UK that makes regular live TV broadcasts. We produce live magazine shows and live outside broadcasts from various locations, as well as making documentary and factual films.

The television industry is one of the most exciting careers on offer to graduates. If you want to do more than simply watch television, doing a television and broadcasting degree such this as give you the chance to get involved in actually producing and transmitting programmes that you know and love.

Apply

How to apply

To start this course in 2019, call our Clearing hotline on +44 (0)23 9284 8090 or go to our Clearing section to chat with us online.

To start this course in 2020, apply through UCAS. You’ll need:

  • the UCAS course code – P30C
  • our institution code – P80

You can start your application now and submit it later if you want.

You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

  • tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
  • speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
  • get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

How to apply from outside the UK

If you're from outside of the UK, you can apply for this course through UCAS (see the 'How to apply' section above for details). You can also apply directly to us or you can get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

Admissions terms and conditions

When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to our terms and conditions as well as the University’s policies, rules and regulations. You should read and consider these before you apply.

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