TV & Broadcasting Course Leaflet Image 2020

UCAS code

P312

Mode of Study

Full-time, Full-time sandwich with work placement

Duration

3 years full-time, 4 years sandwich with work placement

Start date

September 2023

Overview

The UK's television production industry is one of this country's greatest creative success stories. We produce groundbreaking, dynamic and truly creative content and formats that are sold around the world, generating jobs across the country.

Our ScreenSkills Select-accredited Television Production degree course will teach you how to create a wide range of live television and factual programmes, develop media production skills through industry-level practice, and master the practical and business elements of TV production. Using professionally equipped TV and sound studios, you’ll produce and run content for multiple platforms, channels, and audiences, and get a taste of the broadcasting industry.

You'll become an all-purpose, media-savvy, and fully experienced broadcaster who fits the bill for everything the competitive television industry needs: from directing, camera and sound operation, to presenting, editing, and writing.

Course highlights

  • Learn and practice live TV production skills by creating, organising and directing content for our live online weekly TV programme and external events in Portsmouth
  • Gain valuable industry experience by taking an optional one-year placement – some of our students have interned with the biggest players in broadcasting, including Sky, Discovery UK and IMG
  • Experience running a real TV channel by getting involved with our student-led TV channel, CCI TV – one of the first in-house university broadcasting channels in the UK
  • Boost your practice and knowledge by attending specialist masterclasses and workshops on all areas of TV production
  • Widen your broadcasting knowledge by taking specialist modules to support your area of interest
  • Showcase your Avid and Adobe expertise to peers and potential employers by gaining Certified Avid Media Composer and Adobe Creative Associate qualifications
  • Enhance your employability by accessing training events, bursaries and scholarships – one of many advantages of a ScreenSkills Select accreditation

90%

of graduates in work or further study 15 months after this course

(HESA Graduate Outcomes Survey 2018/19)

Accreditation

This course is accredited by ScreenSkills Select, a professional body for the screen industry.

All ScreenSkills Select-accredited courses must show the highest level of quality and relevance to the industry. This ensures you'll learn the knowledge and skills relevant to your future career, and assures potential employers that your degree is relevant to the screen industry. This accreditation also gives you access to exclusive benefits such as employability training events, scholarships and bursaries.

The course is also accredited by Avid to offer a certified user editing course (The Avid MC101/MC110) that's recognised and respected in industry.

What to expect from BA (Hons) Television Production

Find out what our BA (Hons) Television Production students enjoy most about the course

Entry requirements

BA (Hons) Television Production

Typical offers
  • A levels – ABB–BBC
  • UCAS points – 112–128 points to include a minimum of 2 A levels, or equivalent (calculate your UCAS points)
  • BTECs (Extended Diplomas) – DDM–DMM
  • International Baccalaureate – 25

See full entry requirements and other qualifications we accept

Selection process

Applicants may be asked to submit a portfolio of work.

For more information on how to put together a portfolio, read our BA (Hons) Television Production creative portfolio guide.

English language requirements
  • English language proficiency at a minimum of IELTS band 6.5 with no component score below 6.0.

See alternative English language qualifications

We also accept other standard English tests and qualifications, as long as they meet the minimum requirements of your course.

If you don't meet the English language requirements yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

Facilities and specialist equipment

Centre for Creative and Immersive Extended Reality (CCIXR)

Create stunning works for film, TV, music, gaming and immersive reality in the UK's first integrated facility of its kind.

CCIXR stage at University of Portsmouth
Discover the Centre

Eldon TV studios

Learn the skills you need to work in video/audio production and broadcasting and get involved in our student-led TV channel, CCI TV.

Student using film camera viewfinder
Explore the studios

Video editing suite

Award-winning kit for future award-winning filmmakers. Our suite includes non-linear editing software Avid Media Composer and DaVinci Resolve, and specialist hardware for efficient film editing.

Close up image of an electrical sound system
Explore Suite

Careers and opportunities

This degree course can take you in many industry directions. After you've graduated, you can follow the path of our television production graduates who've prospered in successful careers in broadcasting and television transmission, post-production, radio, and TV studio production.

Graduate roles

Many graduates have worked in varied roles, including:

  • camera operator
  • production assistant
  • editor
  • studio manager
  • presentation scheduler
  • junior/production coordinator
  • film/video producer

Graduate destinations

Our graduates have worked with big names such as:

  • Sky
  • BBC
  • National Geographic
  • Channel 4
  • IMG
  • Aurora Media Worldwide
  • Lion TV
  • Envy

Ongoing careers support

Get experience while you study, with support to find part-time jobs, volunteering opportunities, and work experience.

Towards the end of your degree and for up to five years after graduation, you’ll receive one-to-one support from our Graduate Recruitment Consultancy to help you find your perfect role.

Placement year

Between your second and third year, you can do an optional year-long placement to gain valuable industry experience, as well as skills and knowledge to help you with your final-year studies. You can work for a company or organisation, or you can set up and run your own business – either with fellow students or by yourself.

Whichever route you take, you'll get support from Creative Careers.

Creative Careers

Our in-faculty Creative Careers team has extensive recruitment experience and knows the creative sector well, making it easier for students to find placements within the creative industries.

They can guide you through every step of the application process, including:

  • Searching for the ideal job through their database of vacancies
  • Giving tips on how to write an interesting CV that will catch employers' attention, no matter the role
  • Organising mock interviews, so you can hone your technique and familiarise yourself with the recruitment environment
  • Writing your startup business proposal – if you're going down the self-employment route

The team will continue to give you support throughout your placement year.

Placement destinations

Previous students have done placements with some of the big players in the broadcasting industry, including:

  • Discovery UK
  • Sky
  • Envy
  • IMG
  • Ross Video
  • Gearhouse Broadcast

Featured placement

Alex Arroyo – Gymshark

Alex, interning as a Video Editor, shares his experiences of working in his dream role – including highlights, all he's learnt, and how his placement will help his plans for the future.

Read Alex's placement story

What you'll study on this BA (Hons) Television Production degree

Modules

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll study fiction and non-fiction experimental films and critique production modes, structural strategies, and aesthetic approaches.

You'll develop skills in research, concept development, pre-production planning, production techniques and professional practices and work in groups to produce 2 short film.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Identify, collect and deploy ideas related to storytelling modes within fiction and non-fiction experimental films
  • Plan, produce and present a group short film in response to a brief
  • Manage a film production, working effectively as a team
  • Assess, reflect and discuss your own production process and artefacts
  • Recognise, apply and review skills to a professional industry standard
  • Analyse the construction of film
Teaching activities
  • 13 hours of lectures
  • 22 hours of seminars
  • 18 hours of tutorial
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 347 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 1,000-word exercise (20% of final mark)
  • a 5-minute film (30% of final mark) – in response to brief
  • a 5-minute film (30% of final mark) – in response to brief
  • a 1,500-word film analysis (20% of final mark)
What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Demonstrate an ability to outline laws, professional codes of conduct and moral philosophical positions that may relate to creative media production practices, film and TV production and broadcast/exhibition
  • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of produced work with reflective reviews and evaluation
  • Identify and demonstrate the student's own skills, interests and motivations in the context of career decision making
  • Explore the options, both locally and globally, open to students and identify the specific skills and qualities required in broad fields of creative technology industries
  • Evaluate how a student's skills, personal priorities and constraints may affect career decisions and to formulate the action, including the development of new skills, needed to achieve career goals
  • Recognise, identify and develop a professional online presence using and applying appropriate technology to create an effective online portfolio, blog, and CV
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and fieldwork.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • coursework portfolio (50% of final mark)
  • coursework exercise (50% of final mark)
Additional content
What you'll do

You'll develop your knowledge of conducting and using extensive research on a variety of media examples and contexts at undergraduate level.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Understand academic standards and concepts
  • Identify, extract and employ relevant information from appropriate sources
  • Apply generic and specific research/study techniques to the production of assessed work
  • Develop an independent research project to a final group presentation and portfolio essay
  • Use Harvard (APA) academic style in written assessments
Teaching activities

On this module you'll attend practical classes and lectures.

Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 152 hours studying independently. This is around 5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a practical exercise (10% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (40% of final mark)
  • a 10-minute oral assessment and presentation (10% of final mark)
  • a 1,000-word essay (40% of final mark)
Additional content
What you'll do

Your introduction will develop your knowledge of production processes, technologies, terminologies, operating skills, roles and practices related to television production. You'll explore the professional disciplines behind studio and short video film (VT) inserts, from the conception of an idea to delivery. You'll also analyse past and current trends of television formats, and consider diversity and representation in the creation of television show media.

What you'll learn

When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

  • Recognise and utilise the grammar and terminology of professional audio-visual communication
  • Show your ability to create media work using digital filming technology, whilst being mindful of digital formats and graphics for television
  • Analyse video and television from a stylistic, structural, contextual and historical perspective
  • Compare, evaluate and identify key roles, skills, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective multi-camera studio production, and graphics within team production/crewing groups
  • Identify and implement health and safety, welfare and compliance issues associated with television production practice
  • Produce a television programme to a set format (whilst being aware of audience, compliance, diversity, and broadcast legailities)
Teaching activities
  • 16 hours of lectures
  • 34 hours of practical classes and workshops
  • 6 hours of seminars
Independent study time

We recommend you spend at least 344 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

Assessment

On this module, you'll be assessed through:

  • a 2-minute video project (30% of final mark)
  • a 15-minute video project (40% of final mark)
  • a 1,500-word essay (30% of final mark)
What you'll do
The learning outcomes of this module are:
  • Differentiate between the use and application of different editing software platforms
  • Demonstrate understanding and application of basic editing skills with Avid MC
  • Interpret and apply key concepts of digital media management storage and techniques
  • Recognise the application of industry practice on any given project
  • Define the use of particular editing techniques in an artefact

Explore this module

Core modules

What you'll do

You'll follow the typical timeline of industry programme pre-production and learn the key skills of content generation, research and storytelling, to get your ideas off the ground. You'll also explore the key elements of producing a factual programme, how the commissioning process works, how to cast the right people, how to get your idea noticed and how to tell compelling stories.

    What you'll learn

    You’ll learn the key skills of content generation, research and storytelling.

    When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

    • Work as part of an editorial team
    • Develop, pitch and produce factual programming to an industry standard
    • Produce factual media that is technically proficient for broadcast using video recording tools
    • Learn to pitch confidently, and to present and defend an original idea
    • Understand how the commissioning process works, from concept to transmission
    • Understand the factual narrative and develop a topic into TV
    • Critically evaluate a range of factual media programming for audience consumption
    Teaching activities

    On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

      Independent study time

      We recommend you spend at least 167 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 10-minute oral team assessment and accompanying paperwork (30% of final mark)
        • a 7-minute set team exercise and accompanying paperwork (70% of final mark)
        Additional content
        What you'll do

        On this module, you'll create a 20-minute television pilot aimed at a specific time and channel output. You'll focus on what makes a successful format and appropriate content. You'll also develop a brand, working format and style that can be replicated as part of a series.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Critically identify and respond to specific audiences based on output
        • Apply professional health and safety practices
        • Reflect and respond to developing trends in broadcasting
        • Design and develop a television brand that can be replicated, following professional standards
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
        • a 1,500-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
        • a project (40% of final mark)
        Additional content
        What you'll do

        You'll use the critique and outcomes from the Television Pilot module to work on an established television format and develop a live episode two. You'll use an already established style but further improve it, developing your knowledge in the replication of production techniques and assets.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Critically appraise and implement feedback and advice to improve a television production series
        • Identify and implement established styles and production role
        • Understand and identify the limitations and benefits of live television
        • Implement a consistent level of content relevant to a defined audience
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend practical classes and workshops, tutorials, lectures and seminars.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a practical skills assessment (40% of final mark)
        • a 1,500-word portfolio (20% of final mark)
        • a project (40% of final mark)

        Optional modules

        Additional content
        What you’ll do

        Part of your module is delivered in partnership with Sky, combining work-based learning with campus-based teaching, learning and training.

        What you’ll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Understand the broadcast transmission chain
        • Understand IP protocols and networking within transmission
        • Evaluate technical decisions relating to broadcasting (such as QC/monitoring, encoding and signals)
        • Understand the file formats, storage requirements and compression used within video and digital images
        • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts to the use of different topologies (such as cabling and differing connections)
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures, practical classes and work-based learning sessions.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 177 hours studying independently. This is around 5.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 1-hour written exam (50% of final mark)
        • a 1-hour practical skills assessment (50% of final mark)
        What you'll do

        With the support of the Creative Careers team, you can find, apply for and complete a year of a work placement with a variety of employers - previous placements have been offered from NBC, Disney, Warner Bros. and a variety of SME's in the region.

        Teaching activities

        You'll be offered supervisor visits (online, by phone or in person) to support your experience in the workplace.

        Assessment

        You'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of your final mark).

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
        • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
        • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within self-employment, freelancing or business start-ups
        • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
        • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Work independently with less need for supervision and direction
        • Communicate a detailed knowledge of the contexts of business and industry-specific practices relevant to your chosen field
        • Demonstrate awareness of ideas, contexts and frameworks within your chosen area of employment
        • Develop professional working relationships within industry/business disciplines
        • Proactively evaluate your strengths and weaknesses, and develop your own criteria and judgement relating to your business practice, future learning and future employability goals
        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

        What you'll do

        You'll do this by engaging in interdisciplinary work, developing an appreciation of other creative disciplines and understanding how professionals collaborate.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Demonstrate independent, analytical and creative attributes
        • Demonstrate the ability to be an effective team player, able to provide leadership and to support the success of others
        • Communicate clearly and effectively using various methods and to different audiences
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll work independently and in groups with regular tutorial support, and also attend some briefings and lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a group presentation (40% of final mark)
        • an individual portfolio (40% of final mark)
        • a 1,000-word report (20% of final mark)
        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Apply the practical skills and production techniques, appropriate to client requirements
        • Implement creativity in the client’s marketplace
        • Deliver a finished client product to agreed timescales
        • Demonstrate effective project management in the form of a finished client product to agreed timescales
        • Demonstrate professional project management in the form of research, organisation and reflective analysis of the process
        • Explain appropriate professional relationships and attitudes towards colleagues and clients
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend seminars, lectures, practical classes and tutorials.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 10-minute portfolio (70% of final mark)
        • a written essay assignment (30% of final mark)
        What you'll learn
        The learning outcomes of this module are:
        • Reflect on their learning and experience to date and use this as a basis to plan and organise suitable work experience(s) that will enable the development of their professional profile.
        • Propose a programme of learning that enables the development and demonstration of specified professional skills.
        • Critically evaluate their learning and experience and relate this to their future career goals.
        • Communicate the outcomes of their experience, through the effective use of reflective practice.

        Explore this module

        What you'll do

        Study abroad placements are done in year 3 of a 4 year sandwich degree structure. Enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies and develop knowledge and skills essential for roles in the global workforce. Participation in this module is subject to a selection process, supply and demand you'll be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

        Where activity is to be undertaken in a non-English speaking country, you'l need to evidence your language ability and plans for improving your language competency.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your course within a global context
        • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
        • Reflect critically on your personal development during your study abroad, identifying the transferable skills you acquired and their relevance to future study and employability
        Teaching activities

        5 hours of tutorials

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 20 hours studying independently. This is around half an hour a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 2,000 portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)
        What you'll do

        Study abroad placements are done in year 2 of a three year degree. Enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies and develop knowledge and skills essential for roles in the global workforce. Participation in this module is subject to a selection process, supply and demand you'll be assessed on a pass/fail basis.

        Where travelling to a non-English speaking country, you'l need to evidence your language ability and plans for improving your language competency.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Critically assess how activities relate to disciplinary knowledge and practice covered on your course within a global context
        • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
        • Reflect critically on your personal development during your study abroad, identifying the transferable skills you acquired and their relevance to future study and employability
        Teaching activities

        3 hours of tutorials

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 20 hours studying independently. This is around 1 hour a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 2,000 portfolio (pass/fail, pass mark of 40)v
        What you'll do

        You'll enhance your learning experience by adding a global dimension to your studies.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Manage and complete tasks in an overseas study environment relevant to your course, with an appropriate level of skill, independence and performance
        • Reflect on your personal development and how your employability prospects have been enhanced by the exchange
        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

        Additional content
         

         

        What you'll do

        You'll research genre through focused case studies in the horror genre, looking at its inception and main categorisations, and at hybridity and cross-media presentations. You'll explore the production, reception and consumption of horror texts to question the validity of using genre as a category in critical studies.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Discuss the role of genre as a categorisation
        • Explain the critical and economic considerations of media texts
        • Evaluate texts in institutional, historical and cultural contexts
        • Recognise and analyse the cultural relevance of genre in various media
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend weekly 2-hour lectures featuring clips, analysis exercises and lecture discussions, and 3 x 1-hour online seminars to assist with assessment preparation. You'll also have access to one-on-one group tutorials to prepare for assessments.

        You'll be supplied with online resources such as recordings, suggested materials, film and media texts, the reading list and other materials. You'll be able to contact module lecturers in their office hours and via email.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 174 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 2,500-word portfolio (50% of final mark)
        • a 1,500-word academic poster or blog post on a horror media text of your choice (50% of final mark)

        Before your assessments, guidance and informal assessment through drafting and feedback will be offered on an individual basis.

        Additional content
         

         

        What you'll do

        You'll also explore society's engagement with popular screen media.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Apply theoretical and critical approaches to screen media studies
        • Critically identify, select and engage with online resources
        • Use best practice when researching
        • Understand the historical and chronological social context of screen media
        • Combine practice with theory in screen media studies
        • Understand the economic impact of the screen on the creative leisure and entertainment industry
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
        • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
        • a 2,000 word essay (80% of final mark)
        What you'll do

        You'll look at the global representation of sport, with a focus on the UK and the US.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Use different methods and concepts to analyse the representation of sport in media
        • Identify issues related to the relationship between sport and media in historical, economic and cultural circumstances
        • Understand various approaches to the study of sport and the media
        • Reflect on your own methods of study, learning and application
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a coursework exercise (10% of final mark)
        • a 2,000-word essay (90% of final mark)
        What you'll do

        You'll form a small group (typically with 4 other students) and work through areas such as designing, manufacturing and pitching ideas. The knowledge and skill you will get through this module will help you to run your own business, but are also transferable skills you can use in many other careers.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Analyse the complexities of launching a start up business
        • Critically reflect upon the factors which contribute towards successful market research, marketing, manufacturing and selling
        • Recognise suitability for specific roles in business and collaborative working
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently (including group work). This is around 10.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Demonstrate the operation and use of scuba diving equipment
        • Display proficiency in basic diving safety and rescue procedures
        • Understand and apply the physical and physiological principles of diving
        • Plan, organise and conduct safe diving activities appropriate to the circumstances
        • Plan and undertake dives for producing underwater film or photography
        • Use and explain the techniques used in underwater film production and photography
        • Describe and explain the main features of HSE legislation, risk assessment, project reports and the conduct of a diving project, within the Media Approved Codes of Practice
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials and practical workshops.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 160 hours studying independently. This is around 9.5 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a practical skills assessment (pass/fail) - PADI Diving Certification
        • project output (100% of final mark) - either a 3-minute micro film or a production file
        What you'll do

        You'll engage practically and creatively with sound recording and sound design for the film industry. You'll use location recording techniques, specialist sound recording equipment, and professional software packages.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Develop and apply advanced standard operating skills, technical competency and aesthetic judgements, relating to sound design
        • Use the grammar of film languages required in the practice and art of audio acquisition and sound design
        • Identify and review how technical experimentation, application, creativity and aesthetics can enhance the story form, and challenge its conventions and techniques
        • Identify and assess key roles, responsibilities and procedures involved in effective TV and film production team working and processes
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend supervised workshops, practical classes and lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 161 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 5-minute practical skills assessment (70% of final mark)
        • a practical skills assessment (30% of final mark)
        What you'll do

        You'll explore topics including: on-set ingest and logging, storage and media, colour monitoring, preparing for the edit, advanced editing techniques, LUTs, and creative grading and integration.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Identify and apply industry workflows for TV and film production
        • Describe and analyse current trends in post production
        • Design an editing workflow and colour pipeline for a specific camera
        • Apply key theoretical and technical concepts through the use of relevant software
        • Evaluate aesthetic and technical decisions relating to a post-production workflow
        • Apply advanced colour correction and colour grading techniques using industry software
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops. 

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 170 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a 6-minute demonstration video or a 2,000-word written workflow document (100% of final mark).

        Your demonstration video will show the progression from camera master files to high-quality colour-graded final deliverables using DaVinci Resolve or Filmlight Baselight.

        Additional content
         

         

        What you'll do
        The learning outcomes of this module are:
        • Gather and edit news content for a mobile audience using a smartphone.
        • Research and construct a journalism package involving text, images and video for an online audience.
        • Justify and reflect on the execution of a self-shot and edited package.
        • Demonstrate understanding of the potential of social media to drive web traffic.

        Explore this module

        What you'll do

        You'll enter at the appropriate level for your existing language knowledge. If you combine this module with language study in your first or third year, you can turn this module into a certificated course that is aligned with the Common European Framework for Languages (CEFRL).

        What you'll learn
        The learning outcomes of this module are:
        • You'll have improved your linguistic skills in Arabic, British Sign Language, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin, French, German, or Spanish
        • You'll be prepared for Erasmus study abroad

        Explore this module

        Teaching activities
        • 12 x 2-hour seminars
        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 176 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through: 

        • coursework (100% of final mark) 
        What you'll do

        You’ll use software such as Adobe After Effects and Cinema 4D and look at 2D and 3D compositing, green screen, keying, advanced tracking and other techniques that will help you build convincing visual effect scenes and set extensions in your films. 

        Lectures cover shooting for FX, whilst workshops focus on the Post Production methods.

        What you'll learn
        • When you complete this module successfully, you’ll be able to:
        • Apply fundamental compositing skills in After Effects.
        • Develop and show an understanding of the importance of ‘shooting for FX’.
        • Utilise a range of advanced green screen keying techniques.
        • Create and manipulate elements within After Effects.
        • Demonstrate knowledge of how to use appropriate Post Production workflows for VFX delivery through the Online Editor.
        Teaching activities

        On this module, you’ll take part in:

        • Practical classes and workshops
        • Timetabled lectures
        • Tutorials
        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 172 hours doing work-based learning or studying independently. This is around…10 hours a week over the duration of this module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you’ll be assessed by:

        • Coursework (60% of final mark)
        • Set exam (40% of final mark)
        Additional content
        The learning outcomes of this module are:
        • Apply the practice skills and production techniques, appropriate to the client's requirements
        • Implement creativity in the client's market place
        • Develop and deliver a finished product to the client, to agreed timescales, thereby demonstrating effective Project Management
        • Summarise appropriate professional relationships and attitudes towards colleagues and client
        • Demonstrate professional Project Management in the form of Research; organisation and reflective analysis of the process

        Explore this module

        Core modules

        Additional content
        What you'll do

        You'll produce live television for assessment, regular screening events, and online broadcast.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Produce broadcast media on a given subject to industry standards
        • Work to strict broadcast deadlines
        • Demonstrate skills and methods for producing and scheduling a regular broadcast production
        • Critically reflect upon your personal development
        • Evaluate your contribution to working as part of a team
        • Critique, review and selectively consider broadcast content for audience needs based on theme
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend lectures, tutorials, practical classes and workshops.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 263 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a set practical exercise (70% of final mark)
        • a 2,500-word employability-focused portfolio (30% of final mark)
        What you'll do

        You'll learn how to produce demanding factual narrative film and video work, leading to the completion of projects you can use for showreel/portfolio purposes. You'll get extra guidance regarding ethical filmmaking, risk assessment and technique.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Analyse concepts of realism and address problems of recording and representing reality in moving image media
        • Assemble, organise and structure complex documentary narratives that challenge your audience's perception of the subject matter
        • Produce a comprehensive video artefact that demonstrates a contextual understanding of the medium
        • Critically examine – with reference to key documentary theory and film makers – the influence of historical, economical and technological developments in the medium of documentary film making
        Teaching activities

        On this module, you'll attend lectures, seminars and workshops.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 164 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a 2,500-word essay (40% of final mark)
        • a 10-minute video documentary (60% of final mark)
        Additional content
        What you’ll do

        You can create either:

        1. a 4,000–5,000-word essay/report using primary and secondary research to examine or argue a particular issue, or
        2. a TV documentary or programme, supported by a standard 2,000–3,000-word essay or 'video essay'
        What you’ll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Combine knowledge and apply it across areas related to television broadcasting practice
        • Demonstrate critical, creative and/or analytical knowledge of your subject area
        • Demonstrate written and/or verbal communication skills in module-appropriate contexts
        • Critically analyse individual or collective enterprise, creativity and risk in development broadcast work, research activity or production management
        • Critically reflect on your personal growth and identify personal achievements and specific development needs
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll attend project supervision meetings and lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 185 hours studying independently. This is around 11 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a coursework project (100% of final mark).

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Competently understand and reflect on key skills required by industry for a specific career pathway or specialism
        • Analyse and critique specific discipline practices and procedures
        • Compare, contrast and discuss global differences and similarities relating to graduate roles film production
        • Identify and address your personal development needs
        • Deploy and integrate understanding of working with new emerging technologies and practices
        Teaching activities
        • 20 hours of practical classes and workshops
        • 8 hours of lectures
        • 4 hours of seminars
        • 2 hours of tutorial
        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 166 hours studying independently. This is around 10 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through a portfolio (100% of final mark).

        Additional content
         

         

        What you'll do

        You'll oversee and/or design and publish, a personal professional website, which features an industry-level CV, show reel and other examples of work.

        What you'll learn

        When you complete this module successfully, you'll be able to:

        • Demonstrate project management skills in the context of the work you do in the module
        • Demonstrate how to manage your workload and organise material effectively
        • Create an online platform showcasing your skills and examples of your work
        • Evaluate the quality and effectiveness of your work, with reflective reviews and evaluation
        • Document your processes for each assignment in a professional and cohesive way
        • Gather and deploy the skills necessary for continuing personal development in different media contexts and effectively communicate this via a package for self promotion
        • Apply and critically reflect on your graduate and employability skills in a professional work environment
        Teaching activities

        On this module you'll take part in work-based learning and attend seminars and lectures.

        Independent study time

        We recommend you spend at least 134 hours studying independently. This is around 8 hours a week over the duration of the module.

        Assessment

        On this module, you'll be assessed through:

        • a portfolio (70% of final mark)
        • a 1,500-word report (30% of final mark)

        Changes to course content

        We use the best and most current research and professional practice alongside feedback from our students to make sure course content is relevant to your future career or further studies.

        Therefore, some course content may change over time to reflect changes in the discipline or industry. If a module doesn't run, we'll let you know as soon as possible and help you choose an alternative module.

        How you're assessed

        You'll be assessed through:

        • essay and report writing
        • television production artefacts
        • group projects and presentations
        • pitching
        • production files
        • practical assessments
        • workshops and supervised work sessions
        • masterclasses
        • tutorials
        • production meetings

        You’ll be able to test your skills and knowledge informally before you do assessments that count towards your final mark.

        You can get feedback on all practice and formal assessments so you can improve in the future.

        Teaching methods on this course include:

        • lectures
        • seminars
        • workshops

        You'll also learn by studying independently. You can borrow television production gear and use computer workstations in your own time to enhance your learning.

        Teaching profiles

        David Kinnaird
        Course Leader; Senior Teaching Fellow

        David is an experienced Editor, Camera Operator and Documentary Film-maker. Working for Fox News, Firecracker Films and numerous independent documentaries. Bringing expertise in post-production, production and documentary within the teaching team. 

        Charlie Watts
        Academic Lead (Partnerships)

        Before joining the University, Charlie freelanced as an Avid editor, working for Meridian, Channel 4 and Oasis TV, and brings his extensive experience in broadcast television transmission delivery, post-production and teaching to the team.

        His research interests include industry and academic interaction, deep learning via web tree usage, and the evolving methods of broadcasting.

        Evan Pugh
        Lecturer

        Evan is an experienced director of documentaries and reality television, with credits such as Big Brother for Channel Four, Celebrity Scissorhands for the BBC, and Love Island and I’m a Celebrity Get Me Out of Here for ITV.

        Evan has also previously worked on The Lord of the Rings - Return of the King, filming animation reference for the character of Gollum, and he specialises in filming, organising productions, controlling large crews, and covering live broadcasting events.

        How you'll spend your time

        One of the main differences between school or college and university is how much control you have over your learning.

        We're planning for most of your learning to be supported by timetabled face-to-face teaching with some elements of online provision. Please be aware, the balance between face-to-face teaching and online provision may change depending on Government restrictions. You'll also do lots of independent study with support from staff and our virtual learning environment, Moodle. Find out more about how our teaching has transformed to best support your learning.

        A typical week

        We recommend you spend at least 35 hours a week studying for your Television Production degree. In your first year, you’ll be in timetabled teaching activities such as lectures, seminars, tutorials, practical classes, workshops, fieldwork and supervised studio sessions for about 11 hours a week. The rest of the time you’ll do independent study such as research, reading, coursework and project work, alone or in a group with others from your course. Independent study is essential to years 2 and 3 as you'll work on numerous television shows and factual productions.

        Most timetabled teaching takes place during the day, Monday to Friday. You may occasionally need to go to University and course events in the evenings and at weekends. There’s usually no teaching on Wednesday afternoons.

        Term dates

        The academic year runs from September to June. There are breaks at Christmas and Easter.

        See term dates

        Supporting your learning

        The amount of timetabled teaching you'll get on your degree might be less than what you're used to at school or college, but you'll also get support via video, phone and face-to-face from teaching and support staff to enhance your learning experience and help you succeed. You can build your personalised network of support from the following people and services:

        Types of support

        Your personal tutor helps you make the transition to independent study and gives you academic and personal support throughout your time at university.

        You'll have regular contact with your personal tutor in learning activities or scheduled meetings. You can also make an appointment with them if you need extra support.

        In addition to the support you get from your personal tutor, you’ll also have access to a Faculty student support advisor. They can give you confidential, impartial advice on anything to do with your studies and personal wellbeing and refer you to specialist support services.

        You'll have help from a team of faculty academic skills tutors. They can help you improve and develop your academic skills and support you in any area of your study.

        They can help with:

        • improving your academic writing (for example, essays, reports, dissertations)
        • delivering presentations (including observing and filming presentations)
        • understanding and using assignment feedback
        • managing your time and workload
        • revision and exam techniques
        If you need support with software and equipment or you want to learn additional skills (including skills not covered on your course), our creative skills tutors provide free workshops, activities and one-on-one tutorials. Skills you can learn include life drawing, film camera operation and video production.
        Computing support staff are always available to give technical support in the Faculty's computer suites during normal working hours. There's also some support available from 5.00pm to midnight at busy times of the year.

        As well as support from faculty staff and your personal tutor, you can use the University’s Academic Skills Unit (ASK).

        ASK provides one-to-one support in areas such as:

        • academic writing
        • note taking
        • time management
        • critical thinking
        • presentation skills
        • referencing
        • working in groups
        • revision, memory and exam techniques

        If you have a disability or need extra support, the Additional Support and Disability Centre (ASDAC) will give you help, support and advice.

        Our online Learning Well mini-course will help you plan for managing the challenges of learning and student life, so you can fulfil your potential and have a great student experience.

        You can get personal, emotional and mental health support from our Student Wellbeing Service, in person and online. This includes 1–2–1 support as well as courses and workshops that help you better manage stress, anxiety or depression.

        If you require extra support because of a disability or additional learning need our specialist team can help you.

        They'll help you to

        • discuss and agree on reasonable adjustments
        • liaise with other University services and facilities, such as the library
        • access specialist study skills and strategies tutors, and assistive technology tutors, on a 1-to-1 basis or in groups
        • liaise with external services

        Library staff are available in person or by email, phone, or online chat to help you make the most of the University’s library resources. You can also request one-to-one appointments and get support from a librarian who specialises in your subject area.

        The library is open 24 hours a day, every day, in term time.

        If English isn't your first language, you can do one of our English language courses to improve your written and spoken English language skills before starting your degree. Once you're here, you can take part in our free In-Sessional English (ISE) programme to improve your English further.

        Course costs and funding

        Tuition fees (2023 start)

        • UK/Channel Islands and Isle of Man students – £9,250 per year (may be subject to annual increase)
        • EU students – £17,900 a year (including Transition Scholarship – may be subject to annual increase)
        • International students – £17,900 per year (subject to annual increase)

        Funding your studies

        Find out how to fund your studies, including the scholarships and bursaries you could get. You can also find more about tuition fees and living costs, including what your tuition fees cover.

        Applying from outside the UK? Find out about funding options for international students.

        Additional course costs

        These course-related costs aren’t included in the tuition fees. So you’ll need to budget for them when you plan your spending.

        Apply

        How to apply

        To start this course in 2023, apply through UCAS. You'll need:

        • the UCAS course code – P312
        • our institution code – P80

        If you'd prefer to apply directly, use our online application form.

        You can also sign up to an Open Day to:

        • Tour our campus, facilities and halls of residence
        • Speak with lecturers and chat with our students 
        • Get information about where to live, how to fund your studies and which clubs and societies to join

        If you're new to the application process, read our guide on applying for an undergraduate course.

        How to apply from outside the UK

        See the 'How to apply' section above for details of how to apply. You can also get an agent to help with your application. Check your country page for details of agents in your region.

        To find out what to include in your application, head to the how to apply page of our international students section. 

        If you don't meet the English language requirements for this course yet, you can achieve the level you need by successfully completing a pre-sessional English programme before you start your course.

        Admissions terms and conditions

        When you accept an offer to study at the University of Portsmouth, you also agree to abide by our Student Contract (which includes the University's relevant policies, rules and regulations). You should read and consider these before you apply.